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The Essence of Faith-Full Sermon Transcript

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MARK 5:21 - 5:43

PASTOR: FORREST SHORT

SCRIPTURE READING

Jesus Heals a Woman and Jairus’s Daughter 

And when Jesus had crossed again in the boat to the other side, a great crowd gathered about him, and he was beside the sea. Then came one of the rulers of the synagogue, Jairus by name, and seeing him, he fell at his feet and implored him earnestly, saying, “My little daughter is at the point of death. Come and lay your hands on her, so that she may be made well and live.” And he went with him.

And a great crowd followed him and thronged about him. And there was a woman who had had a discharge of blood for twelve years, and who had suffered much under many physicians, and had spent all that she had, and was no better but rather grew worse. She had heard the reports about Jesus and came up behind him in the crowd and touched his garment. For she said, “If I touch even his garments, I will be made well.” And immediately the flow of blood dried up, and she felt in her body that she was healed of her disease. And Jesus, perceiving in himself that power had gone out from him, immediately turned about in the crowd and said, “Who touched my garments?” And his disciples said to him, “You see the crowd pressing around you, and yet you say, ‘Who touched me?’” And he looked around to see who had done it. But the woman, knowing what had happened to her, came in fear and trembling and fell down before him and told him the whole truth. And he said to her, “Daughter, your faith has made you well; go in peace, and be healed of your disease.”

While he was still speaking, there came from the ruler’s house some who said, “Your daughter is dead. Why trouble the Teacher any further?” But overhearing what they said, Jesus said to the ruler of the synagogue, “Do not fear, only believe.” And he allowed no one to follow him except Peter and James and John the brother of James. They came to the house of the ruler of the synagogue, and Jesus saw a commotion, people weeping and wailing loudly. And when he had entered, he said to them, “Why are you making a commotion and weeping? The child is not dead but sleeping.” And they laughed at him. But he put them all outside and took the child’s father and mother and those who were with him and went in where the child was. Taking her by the hand he said to her, “Talitha cumi,” which means, “Little girl, I say to you, arise.” And immediately the girl got up and began walking (for she was twelve years of age), and they were immediately overcome with amazement. And he strictly charged them that no one should know this, and told them to give her something to eat.

—Mark 5:21-43 ESV

INTRO

Well, good morning. How is everyone? Good. Mark’s great, anyway. Good to see you guys. My name’s Forrest, I’m one of the pastors here at Emmaus. And, this morning we’re going to be looking at this text, and we’re going to be basically answering the question, what does it mean, or what does it look like, to live a life of faith? 

There’s a lot of ambiguity around the idea of faith. There’s a lot, honestly, of really bad teaching around what faith actually is. You may have experienced some of that, that faith is somehow opposed to the mind, that it’s somehow opposed to logical thinking, or that somehow if you have enough faith, you can get whatever you want from God. Sometimes known as, “name it, claim it”, or, “blab it and grab it.” We’ve heard these teachings, that if we just have enough faith, we can have whatever we want, or that if we truly believe Christ, if we truly have faith in him, then we don’t need to plan, we don’t need to think about the future, we just trust him day by day. And, it’s a very reductionistic, and quite honestly, oftentimes just a flat out wrong understanding of biblical faith. 

So, what does it look like to have a life of faith? This morning, we’re looking at the essence of faith. What is the essence of faith, or the life of faith? We’re going to walk through three aspects of faith that I think flesh out for us what the essence of faith is. First, we see desperation. Next, we see delay. Now, you might wonder, what does that have to do with faith? It actually has a lot to do with faith. And, finally, dependency. What does it look like to live dependent upon Christ? So, let’s pray and then we’re going to go right into the text. It’s rich and it’s full this morning, so I’m excited to jump in. 

Lord, thank you for your goodness. Thank you that even faith is a gift from you, because every good and perfect gift comes from the father, the father of lights, in whom there is no shadow of change, no turning. Lord, we are grateful this morning that your spirit is at work in and through your people, in and through your Word. We ask that your Spirit would open our eyes to the beauty, to the truth of this scripture, and that your Spirit would drop these truths deeply into our hearts, and into our minds that they may bear fruit. We ask this in Jesus’ name, amen. 

I. DESPERATE FOR JESUS (How we come to Him)

So, first we see a desperation for Jesus. That’s our first point. A life of faith looks like being desperate for Jesus. Or, desperate for Jesus, how we come to him. So, what we see in our story is that Jesus is approached by a man named Jairus, who was one of the rulers of the synagogue, it says in verse 22, which means that he would have been responsible for the general oversight of the synagogue. He was a layperson, he wasn’t a full time person that was paid, per se, but he would decide who would do the readings on the Sabbath, what readings there would be, the particulars of the readings, and he would decide who would teach and explain the Torah. So, general oversight. This means, also, because this synagogue was the hub of Jewish culture, this means that he would have been a prominent public figure, highly respected, normally upright, most likely very wealthy. 

But, it’s interesting, here, that culturally, the behavior that we see in the text does not demonstrate his standing. In fact, he does something in this text he probably has never done in his life. In verse 22, he comes to Jesus, and he falls at his feet. This man of wealth, this man of power, this man of prominence and position, in the midst of a crowd of people, he comes and falls at the feed of Jesus. He’s desperate. And, he’s desperate for a good reason. He’s desperate because, unless Jesus heals his daughter, her death is certain. Jesus is the hope for one of the people he loves most in the world. It’s not hard for us to understand where he’s coming from. All of us, to some degree or another, have experienced death. We’ve experienced people that we know, and people that we’ve loved, dying. And so, we get this desperation.

Now, it’s interesting here, as well, that Jesus hasn’t had the best relationships with the synagogues. Jesus tended to get into some trouble at times in the synagogue, because he was a threat to the religious status quo. He came in with these incredible claims of being the fulfillment of scripture, and on a practical level, what this meant for Jairus, is that it would have been best for his position, it would have been wise for him to stay out of entanglements with Jesus, at the very least, to remain neutral. Because, this meant that his position would have been scrutinized. He was coming to Jesus and falling at his feet, this man that caused so much chaos in the synagogues. 

So, he doesn’t stay out of this entanglement, though. His desperation overrides his personal concerns for position, and his personal concerns for safety. And, that’s what desperation does. Let’s look at verses 23 and 24. So, he comes, he sees Jesus, he falls at his feet, and it says … and implored him earnestly, saying, “My little daughter is at the point of death. Come and lay your hands on her so that she may be made well and live,” and he went with him … Jesus, notice, responds to this desperate plea. Jesus responds. See, there’s no questioning, there’s simply … and he goes with him. Jesus responds and the crowd follows at it continues in verse 24 … and a great crowd followed him and thronged about him … They wanted to see this miracle. They knew that he was a miracle worker, so they were following, because they wanted to see another one. 

Now, imagine for a moment the mix of emotions Jairus must have had at this point. Imagine the mix of nervousness and excitement. The mix of anxiety, and hope. This may actually happen, he said yes, he’s coming with me! Maybe there is hope for my daughter. And, you can picture Jairus sort of leading Jesus, or at least I can picture myself leading Jesus with these fast paced steps on the way to get to his daughter, and then occasionally looking back over his shoulder to see if Jesus was still coming, if the hope was still there, and picture that. This mix of anxiety and hope. 

And, in one moment, he looks back over his shoulder, and Jesus isn’t there. Jairus looks over his shoulder, and Jesus has stopped, and he’s scanning the crowd. It seems to be he’s looking for something. He stopped. Look at verses 25-30 … And there was a woman who had had a discharge of blood for twelve years, and who had suffered much under many physicians, and had spent all that she had, and was no better but rather grew worse. She had heard the reports about Jesus and came up behind him in the crowd and touched his garment. For she said, “If I touch even his garments, I will be made well.” And immediately the flow of blood dried up, and she felt in her body that she was healed of her disease. And Jesus, perceiving in himself that power had gone out from him, immediately turned about in the crowd and said, “Who touched my garments?” … This is why he stopped. This is why, in the march to the deathbed, he stops, and he turns, and he scans the crowd. A woman has touched the hem of his garment, and this woman, here, is inserted into this story because she is the antithesis of Jairus. 

She was a complete and total outcast, socially. Leviticus 15 gives us details about what this woman would have been enduring. Because, it tells us that a woman during her menstrual flow is unclean for seven days, but that if it’s an ongoing blood flow, that she was unclean as long as the blood flowed. Do you remember how long the blood flowed for this woman? 12 years. 12 years of being unclean. Now, clean versus unclean is alien to us today. We’ve touched on it, some, in the book of Mark. But, we need to understand that she was untouchable. We need to understand that when she went into public, even though she was not supposed to go in the midst of crowds, if she did meander into the midst of a crowd, there would be cries of “unclean!” that would go before her, so that the sea of people would part and give her a wide space. She was untouchable. Could you imagine going, today, to Citrus Plaza, and as you walk into Citrus Plaza, people begin to cry out, “unclean!”? Could you imagine what that would do to your soul, to your mind, to your sense of worth? Could you imagine how that would shrivel you inwardly?

She was cut off from society, and she was cut off from the temple. She was cut off from worship. She had suffered much, it says, under physicians, and had spent everything she has. And, it says that she was actually worse off for it. Now, physicians during that time were - as you read about their specific practices - they were more like magicians, than anything. The Talmud, which is a Jewish commentary on the law and the prophets, gives us some of the cures for this type of ailment. And, undoubtedly, some of the cures that this woman would have tried. I’ll give you a few of them, here. One of them is to take a kind of resin - which you get from a tree, a kind of gum - and, you mix it with wine, and you drink it. Another, is to boil some onions, and mix it with wine, and as they drink it, say, “Arise from thy flux.” It sounds like Harry Potter stuff, right? Another one is you go to an intersection of roads, where you have to decide to go one way or another, and, again with a cup of wine in your right hand - obviously, wine was the go-to medicine of the day - with a cup of wine in your right hand, have someone come up behind the person and scare them, and again, you say, “Arise from thy flux.” It’s a miracle she wasn’t healed, right? 

This is the kind of stuff that, apparently, she spent all her money on, in a desperate attempt to go from unclean to clean. And, she is left worse off than she was. It says that she suffered. The word, suffered, there, really is most akin to the word torment. This woman has been tormented. She is suffering as much from the cures as she is from the disease. And, so, she is desperate. She is desperate, and she throws herself at his feet, as well. So, we get in this two people, in desperate situations, coming to Jesus. 

What does a life of faith look like? It looks like being desperate for Jesus. Thomas Watson, who was a 17th century pastor, he said … Faith can make use of the waters of affliction, to swim faster to Christ … Do you find yourself in the midst of affliction this morning? In the midst of sin, in the midst of suffering? The imagine of Psalm 130, is of drowning in the depths of suffering and sinfulness, and I want to read that this morning … 

Out of the depths I cry to you, O Lord!

 O Lord, hear my voice!

Let your ears be attentive

    to the voice of my pleas for mercy!

If you, O Lord, should mark iniquities,

    O Lord, who could stand?

But with you there is forgiveness,

    that you may be feared.

I wait for the Lord, my soul waits,

    and in his word I hope;

my soul waits for the Lord

    more than watchmen for the morning,

    more than watchmen for the morning.

O Israel, hope in the Lord!

    For with the Lord there is steadfast love,

    and with him is plentiful redemption.

And he will redeem Israel

    from all his iniquities.

  • Psalm 130, ESV

 

In the midst of drowning in our sin and our suffering, the Psalmist says, we don’t look in, we look up. We look up desperately, cause there’s only one who rescues us in the midst of that. This morning, do we see our need for him? And, it’s not just sin and suffering that drive us to Christ. It is meant that, even in the good times, that we should be driven to Christ. If we’re honest, if the testimony that we see from scripture is true, that it often takes affliction to help us see our desperate need for Christ. It’s in the midst of that, that we recognize that we can’t fix it ourselves, that our hope must be in another. We don’t look in, we look up. But, you may find yourself, not in the midst of this deep kind of affliction. Even in the midst of that, our prayer should be, Lord, make me desperate for you.

It’s one of the great challenges, I think, of the church in the west, is, in the midst of our prosperity, in the midst of how much we have to thank God for it, it can lull us to sleep. It can make us less than desperate for God. So, a life of faith means a life of desperation for God. We don’t look in, we look up. Are you desperate this morning? If not, ask the Lord, Lord, make me desperate for you. Help me to see my need for you, whether I’m in the midst of good times or difficult affliction. Lord, help me to see my need for you. This is how we come to Christ.

 

II. DELAYED BY JESUS (How we grow to trust Him)

See, without desperation, we never come to him. And, we’re called to come to him again, and again, and again. Are we desperate for him? And from there, as we come to him desperately, what can be difficult is in the midst of our desperation, Lord, we come to you, we experience delay. Any of you guys ever experienced that with the Lord? You go to him, you’re praying, you’re wondering, how long is this going to take? What is the deal with this delay, I don’t understand it. We see that, deeply, in our text. Delayed by Jesus. Delay is how we grow to trust him. So, we come to him desperately, and as we come to him, no doubt in the midst of it, his timeline will be different than ours.

So, as we come, what we see is that there is a problem here from the lady that she’s bringing to Jesus, that is chronic. The issue of blood has been going on for 12 years, and then there’s a problem that is acute. There is this young girl, 12 years old, who has a fever and she is on the verge of death. So, we have this chronic problem, and we have this acute problem that could lead to death. And, notice what Jesus does. Jesus chooses to stop and deal with what seems to be the less urgent of the two problems. Think about it in this way. Think about a doctor’s office. If two people show up at the same time, and they go see the doctor, and one has a chronic issue that’s been going on for a number of years, and one has an acute issue that could result in death, there’s no question about which one you go see first, right? I heard one person say that Jesus would have had a malpractice lawsuit, right? You don’t do that. It doesn’t make sense to us. What’s he doing here? What is this delay about?

The great physician, here, chooses to give his attention to the chronic issue, the one that doesn’t seem pressing. Now, again, can you imagine Jairus at this point? Quickly walking, Jesus is following, looking over his shoulder, he’s stopped, and he sees exactly what he’s dealing with, what Jesus has stopped for. Not a woman who seems to be on the verge of death, but a woman who is unclean, a woman who is not welcome in his synagogue, a woman he would never be around. Jesus has stopped for her. Can you imagine the frustration and angst? Doesn't Jesus know that this is urgent? Doesn’t Jesus know that time is of the essence? What is he doing? He’s clearly not thinking well. Does he recognize what’s happening?

And then, it intensifies. Jairus’ worst fear is realized. Look at verse 35 … While he was still speaking, there came from the ruler’s house some who said, “Your daughter is dead. Why trouble the Teacher any further?” … We’ve just gone to a whole other level. Now this delay has resulted in the death of my daughter, the very reason I desperately came to you. It’s easy, very easy to get Jairus’ perspective on this. Because, it’s easy for us to believe we know what the best move is in a given situation, don’t we? We think we know Jesus well enough to be able to discern what his next move is going to be. Certainly, he’s going to do this, because it’s obvious. Obviously, this is the right move, Jesus, just listen to me. I’ll point you in the right direction, Jesus, just listen to me.

And then, in the midst of that, in the midst of our desperation, in the midst of praying, in the midst of going to Christ, he does something that makes no sense at all. He does something that frustrates us, that angers us. Some of us are dealing with that this morning. We’re in the midst of that. We’ve prayed, we’ve asked, we’ve gone to Christ desperately, yet it doesn’t seem to be going the way we think it should. Some of us are struggling with the synecism in the face of that reality.

I think one thing that’s important for us to grasp as we, in the midst of our desperation, seek to live a life of faith, and for our faith to grow, our trust to grow in Christ, is that the opposite of faith isn’t doubt, the opposite of faith is control. The opposite of faith is, “I know what needs to be done,” and that whether we give voice to it or not, whether we articulate it or not, we expect God to somehow be subservient to that. The opposite of faith isn’t doubt, it’s control. And, precisely because in the delay Jesus is bringing about our good, precisely for that reason, he will not be controlled by what we think he should do. He loves us too much. He cares for us too much.

And so, what we see in this, is that with Jesus, delayed does not mean denied. Delayed, for your situation, does not mean denied. It may not becoming like you expect or as quickly as you expect, but because of who Jesus is, remember last week we looked at Jesus was both good and powerful, and we have to believe both of those. If we don’t, we will live a very angsty Christian life. He is good and powerful, he is both of those things. And, if we believe that, we have to trust that if we are experiencing a delay, it’s because there’s something at play in the situation that God knows, and we don’t. And, man, that’s hard for us. Isn’t it? It’s hard for us. It’s hard for us, people who love calendars and scheduling and planning, and we love to be able to look at everything and go, that fits there, and that fits there, and then we look at our week, and we go, oh, yes. I’m in control. And then, we go to God and he blows it all up. Yes. it’s because, if he is good and powerful, there’s something at play in the delay that God knows, and we don’t. 

I know when I look back at the frustrating delays of my life, and I’m just speaking of me, I’m sure this isn’t you, I see a level of arrogance and control, that I know better than God knows. Listen, if God would have let me and my wife leave the church we were at, plant Emmaus Church, all this awesome stuff that’s happening now wouldn’t have happened in 11 years, it would have happened the first year. Right? If it was up to me, it all would have been happening like this, but that’s not the way God works, and in the midst of Emmaus Church being planted, the gospel was being planted in me, and it was being planted in you, and it was not my timeline. I mean, if I could go back and show you the initial timeline of, this is what Emmaus Church was going to be in three years, it would be hilarious. You’d go, wow, I don’t know if it was faith or if you were just a naive knucklehead.

And, it’s true. I was. One of the things, the older I get, as I look back on my life, it becomes more and more clear that there is one God, and I am not him. He knows better than me. The stuff he worked in me over this long period, and my wife, and my family, I’m so grateful for it, which brings us to the good news about delays. We saw last week that his grace, and his love are compatible with storms, with the anti-kingdom that comes against us, and in this week’s text we see that his grace and his love are compatible with delays.

See, the delays of God are bringing about our good. I don’t tell you that based upon my own experience, I tell you that based upon the powerful and good God that is revealed in scripture, and the purposes that he has for his people. The delays of God are bringing about our good. In fact, listen to this, the delays of God mean that we will sacrifice more than we thought, and we will gain more than we hoped. This is clear in the next. The woman with the issue of blood comes to Jesus in faith, at great risk to herself, she’s not supposed to be in the midst of this crowd of people, she pushes through the crowd, touches the hem of Jesus’ garment, a woman who is unclean touching a rabbi, major no-no. And, immediately receives the healing. And, when she receives it, she goes right back into the crowd. She wants this healing, she is desperate for Jesus, but she wants it incognito. She wants it without anyone knowing. 

But, notice what Jesus does. He calls her out in front of the crowd. Again, you might question his wisdom, hey, who knows, they could stone this lady, they could beat her, no telling what they could do. It doesn’t seem wise to us, but Jesus has her good in mind. He calls her out in front of the crowd, he forces her to go public. See, the desperate faith that brought her to Jesus is now requiring more of her than she thought. But, look at what happens in verse 33 … But the woman, knowing what had happened to her, came in fear and trembling and fell down before him and told him the whole truth … Jesus, it was me that touched you, she’s saying. I know I shouldn’t have, it was me, she’s fearful. And, he said to her … “Daughter, … this term of endearment … your faith has made you well; go in peace, and be healed of your disease.” …

Go in peace. We’ve talked about that word before, that word shalom, it’s this idea of perfect harmony with God. It’s not just physical healing, this is a deep restoration of harmony with God, which results in restoration of relationship with self, and with creation, and with others. This is this holistic, beautiful healing. She comes to Jesus to do a touch and run, and Jesus doesn’t let her. He says, not so fast. We’re going to make this thing public, and you’re going to get a far greater healing than you came for. That’s the redemption of Christ. She comes to Jesus to touch and run, and Jesus asks more of her than she thought, and he gives her more than she came for. That is at work in the delays. That is at work, but we have to trust that that is at work, and we have to have faith, believe, because he is powerful and good, that that is at work.

See, what Jairus can’t see in the delay, what he cannot see, is that Jesus takes a woman with an almost superstitious faith, it seems, who came for a bodily healing, and makes her a transformed disciple for all eternity, and he says, Jesus is saying, that has to be acted upon now. I have to do that now. The opportunity is now. So, your delay is this woman’s eternal security, this woman’s holistic healing. It’s the same for Jairus, though. He comes to Jesus, and Jesus asks more of him. He comes to Jesus to cure a fever, and when it’s over with, he gets a resurrection. Jesus asks him to believe. Look at what Jairus upon the news that his daughter has died, in verse 36 … While he was still speaking, there came from the ruler’s house some who said, “Your daughter is dead. Why trouble the Teacher any further?” But overhearing what they said, Jesus said to the ruler of the synagogue, “Do not fear, only believe.” … 

Now, Jairus comes to Jesus trusting only that Jesus would come with him so that his daughter might be healed. And now, he’s being asked to trust Jesus in the midst of his daughter’s death. It’s more than he asked for. But, what we see is that he also gets more than he hoped. He comes to Jesus to cure a fever, and he gets a resurrection. See, Jesus tells him in the midst of that news, he says, believe in me, trust me. And, when Jesus asks Jairus to trust him, I sort of get this picture of him looking around Jairus, straight at me, and telling me the same thing. Believe me. Trust me. In the midst of affliction, in the midst of your desperation, in the midst of the delay, trust me. 

See, the delays force us with our weak faith, to trust in a great Christ. We’re asked to believe based upon the character of Christ, and that’s what it means to be dependent. A life of faith means that we come to him desperately, that in the midst of the delay, our faith grows, we continue to believe in him, even though his timeline is not the same as ours, even though he’s working in a way that we don’t believe is perhaps the best, we believe, we trust, our faith grows in the midst of that, so that we become people we are dependent upon him, in every season of life.

III. DEPENDENT UPON JESUS (How we remain in Him)

The final point, how we remain in him. So, a life of faith means we see our need for Jesus, we come to him desperately, but we also must see something of his character, right? We only depend upon that which we find dependable. And so, if we are not consistently depending upon Christ, then it means there’s something we’re not seeing about the character and nature of Christ, who he truly is. And so, there are three things, real quick, I want to hit that we see. 

One, what we need to see to live dependent upon him is that his grace is for you. His grace is for you, unqualified you … whoever would come to me … his grace is for you. We see this in the juxtaposition, which we mention, of Jairus and the woman with the issue of blood. Jairus is a male. In that culture, with all the power. She’s a female with no power. He’s a synagogue ruler, she’s ceremonially unclean, can’t enter the synagogue. He’s wealthy, she spent all of her money to try to get well. He’s at the top of the social hierarchy, she’s at the bottom. Yet, in the midst of that, Jesus turns to the woman and gives her his full attention, treating her as if there is nothing else in the world happening here, but you. In the midst of this crowd of people, when he asks, who touched me? Remember the disciples? What did they say? What do you mean who touched you? Everybody’s touching you! This is a crazy scene, but in the midst of that, he looks at her as if she is the only person in the world, his grace is for you. He turns to a woman with zero status and power, and makes a religious leader wait in the moment of his greatest need. His grace is for you.

This isn’t unusual for Jesus to do. We see it over and over in the gospels. You have an insider and an outsider, and Jesus turns quickly to the outsider. Right? You have someone who’s really messed up, you have someone who is an outcast, and they’re drawn in by Jesus again and again. See, the kingdom of God reverses the values of the world. Jesus doesn’t come to people on the basis of pedigree, on the basis of status, on the basis of anything else. He comes to them because of his grace. And, he comes to us because of his grace.

Listen, this morning it doesn’t matter who you are, it doesn’t matter what you’ve done. Jesus’ grace is for you. Paul tells us he’s chosen the foolish things of the world to shame the wise, so that no one could boast in his presence. We have nothing to bring before him to boast of, and that’s how we can know his grace is for us. So, we have this juxtaposition, this interweaving of these two stories from two radically different places. It’s meant to tell us the greatest to the least and everything in between, his grace is for you. 

Secondly, his power is for you. Again, we saw that last week. But, at this point, the plot has thickened. The report is that the girl is dead, but Jesus says he’s going anyway. And, Jesus shows up, and everybody’s wailing, and actually during that time, at funerals they would hire professional mourners, and they would come, and there would be loud weeping, and there would be dirt on head, and there would be torn clothes, and it would have been a very chaotic scene that Jesus would have walked into. And so, what we’ve seen leading up to this, last week, we’ve seen Jesus’ power over creation, in the storm. We’ve seen Jesus’ power over the anti-kingdom, and the daemoniac. Now, we see his kingdom over our greatest enemy, death. 

When we talk about sin, sin and death are bed fellows, right? And, they have a lot of friends, and we experience all of those. We all experience some aspect of the fallenness of this world, the sin and death of this world. And so, what we’re seeing is that Jesus, in his power that is for us, that it conquers our greatest enemy, death. It’s confusing, though, that Jesus says, she’s just sleeping. Did you catch that? What does he mean there? Many people have questioned, so is this a resuscitation or a resurrection? Was she just sleeping? But, when we look at the other accounts, Luke 8:22, which treats this narrative, he says her spirit returned to her. She was dead. That’s biblical language for she had died. Everyone knew she was dead. So why does he say this? I think, in one sense, in light of Christ’s power, it’s because death, for the believer, is like waking up after a good sleep. And, you might go, what? What are you talking about? But, look at the language. I think it unpacks it a little more.

He goes in to see this little girl, 12 years old, and it says he takes her by the hand, and he says … talitha … meaning, little girl, or perhaps, a deeper meaning might be little lady, or one translator said it could mean, today, it would have been an expression like honey. This is a deep term of endearment for this little girl, and it’s a name a parent would use for their little girl. And he says, talitha koum, koum means wake up, honey, daughter, wake up. See, Jesus, here, is facing a greater foe than a hurricane or demons that we’ve looked at in previous weeks. He’s facing death, a most feared enemy of the human race. And, Jesus, the creator, the same hands that scattered the stars and formed the mountains, grabs this little girl by the hand, and he raises her up through death as if it’s nothing to him. That’s the power of Christ, and that power is for you. 

Jesus says, essentially, if i have you by the hand, death is nothing more than a good night’s sleep. It’s like a good night’s sleep when you’re a kid, and you wake up and you realize you’re going to Disneyland. That’s what death is. Do you remember feelings like that? Maybe it was something else, maybe Disneyland wasn’t your thing. But, when your mom or your dad would wake you up, and you’d realize, oh, today’s the day. That’s death for the believer. Wake up, today’s the day. I get to be with him. He gently lifts her through it. That is his power. And, how does that power come to bear in our life? 

Finally, he became weak for you. It’s interesting that he notices power goes out from him when the woman with the issue of blood touches the hem of his garment. Because, that doesn’t happen, you notice, when he speaks to the hurricane on the sea. He speaks as if it’s a little child. There’s no sense of power going out from him, that’s not mentioned. But, here, it’s almost in his humanity, we see a weakness. We see this power goes out from him, so she might receive shalom true peace. And, I think it’s foreshadowing the cross of Christ. 

How can he hold us by hand, despite our weakness, despite our evil? The answer is, because he became weak for us. 2 Corinthians 13:4 speaks about this … For he was crucified in weakness, but lives by the power of God. For, we also are weak in him, but in dealing with you, we will live with him by the power of God … Crucified in weakness, that we could live in God’s power. Crucified in weakness, that we could live a life of faith. 

See, Jesus, in a sense, lost his Father’s hand on the cross, so that we could take hold of his hand, and went into the tomb so that we could be raised out of it, and he went and was crucified, cast out, outside the camp he became unclean so that we could be brought in and made clean. This is the Christ that we desperately long for. This is the Christ, because of his power and goodness, because his grace is for you and his power is for you, and he became weak for you, no matter your station in life, you can live a life of faith knowing that though it will cost you more than you imagine, you will receive more than you hoped. Let’s pray. 

Jesus, 

We are grateful this morning for this truth, for this beautiful reality that because of the work of Jesus Christ, because of the incarnation of Christ, because of the gift of Christ becoming weak for us, we can live lives of faith. People that are desperate for Christ, that recognize we have no hope apart from him, and yet at the same time, Lord, we are people who in the midst of delay, recognize that God’s good is at work in our lives, even if we can’t understand it. And, Lord, that leads us to being a dependent people, because God, you are dependable. Lord, as we come to the table this morning, may we come as people who are transferring trust from ourselves, to you. Lord, I know there are people here in the midst of serious sin and suffering and difficulty and the fallenness of this world. God, I pray that in the midst of the delay they may be experiencing, that you would bring to their heart and mind in this meal your goodness, that your grace is for them, your power is for them, that you became weak for them, that they might live in the resurrection power. God, may we live into that reality this morning. We ask in Jesus’ name, amen. 


The Power and Goodness of Christ-Full Sermon Transcript

Link to Blog

PASTOR: FORREST SHORT

SCRIPTURE READING

Jesus Calms a Storm 

On that day, when evening had come, he said to them, “Let us go across to the other side.” And leaving the crowd, they took him with them in the boat, just as he was. And other boats were with him. And a great windstorm arose, and the waves were breaking into the boat, so that the boat was already filling. But he was in the stern, asleep on the cushion. And they woke him and said to him, “Teacher, do you not care that we are perishing?” And he awoke and rebuked the wind and said to the sea, “Peace! Be still!” And the wind ceased, and there was a great calm. He said to them, “Why are you so afraid? Have you still no faith?” And they were filled with great fear and said to one another, “Who then is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him?”

Jesus Heals a Man with a Demon 

They came to the other side of the sea, to the country of the Gerasenes. And when Jesus had stepped out of the boat, immediately there met him out of the tombs a man with an unclean spirit. He lived among the tombs. And no one could bind him anymore, not even with a chain, for he had often been bound with shackles and chains, but he wrenched the chains apart, and he broke the shackles in pieces. No one had the strength to subdue him. Night and day among the tombs and on the mountains he was always crying out and cutting himself with stones. And when he saw Jesus from afar, he ran and fell down before him. And crying out with a loud voice, he said, “What have you to do with me, Jesus, Son of the Most High God? I adjure you by God, do not torment me.” For he was saying to him, “Come out of the man, you unclean spirit!” And Jesus asked him, “What is your name?” He replied, “My name is Legion, for we are many.” And he begged him earnestly not to send them out of the country. Now a great herd of pigs was feeding there on the hillside, and they begged him, saying, “Send us to the pigs; let us enter them.” So he gave them permission. And the unclean spirits came out and entered the pigs; and the herd, numbering about two thousand, rushed down the steep bank into the sea and drowned in the sea.

The herdsmen fled and told it in the city and in the country. And people came to see what it was that had happened. And they came to Jesus and saw the demon-possessed man, the one who had had the legion, sitting there, clothed and in his right mind, and they were afraid. And those who had seen it described to them what had happened to the demon-possessed man and to the pigs. And they began to beg Jesus to depart from their region. As he was getting into the boat, the man who had been possessed with demons begged him that he might be with him. And he did not permit him but said to him, “Go home to your friends and tell them how much the Lord has done for you, and how he has had mercy on you.” And he went away and began to proclaim in the Decapolis how much Jesus had done for him, and everyone marveled.

—Mark 4:35 - 5:20 ESV

INTRO

Good morning, I’m Forrest, I’m one of the pastors here, and as always, it is good to be with you. Do we have any Chronicles of Narnia fans out there? Alright, a lot. Yeah, at this point it’s kind of become a part of our pop culture with the movies popularizing it, and I think one of the most well known lines from The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe encapsulates well what our text is bringing to us this morning.

If you remember in the story, we’ll kind of geek out for a second here, Mr. Beaver tells Susan that Aslan, the ruler of Narnia,is a lion. Do you remember this? And, Susan is surprised because she assumes that Aslan is a man, certainly a ruler is a man. She then tells Mr. Beaver, I shall feel rather nervous about meeting a lion. She asks Mr. Beaver then, subsequently, if Aslan is safe, to which Mr. Beaver replies … 

“Safe? Who said anything about safe? ‘Course he isn’t safe. But he’s good. He’s the King.”

—The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe

This line encapsulates our two narratives this morning. Nothing with unmanageable power is safe. And, at the same time, not everything with unmanageable power is good. I wonder if this morning, we think of Jesus in that way. I wonder, do we believe him to be powerful, and good. See, we must believe him to be both, or we will end up living anemic Christian lives at best. In every season of life, do we believe that he is both powerful and good. And so, I think in our text, in the first narrative, we have a story of Christ’s power laced with his goodness. And, I think in the second story, of the Gerasene demoniac, we have a story of Christ’s goodness, laced with his power. So, this morning, the track we’re going to walk, there’s a lot of ground to cover here, there are many layers.

So, I’d encourage you to try to track with me this morning. We’re actually going to start in apocalyptic literature. That would be the point at which you may feel like hitting the eject button. Don’t do it, track with me, otherwise you may wake up in the middle of the sermon wondering where we are, feeling like maybe I just told you you were possessed with a demon, and I promise you, that’s not the point of the sermon this morning. So, track with me, I think there’s big payoff, a lot of layers. This week in studying God’s word, I was reminded of the richness of it, that it’s so rich, that we can spend our lives plumbing its depths and never exhaust it, yet at the same time it’s so simple that a kid can grasp it and respond to it with faith in Jesus Christ.

So, the task before us this morning, then, is to see, how do we see in our text that Jesus is both good, and powerful? So, let’s pray before we jump in.

Jesus,

we are thankful for this great truth. Lord, it is easy for one of those aspects of who you are to become undermined in our own hearts, and in our own minds. Lord, as we come to your text, we are thankful that it is powerful, and it is sharp as a two-edged sword, and it cuts deeply, and we are grateful for that. Lord, reveal to us our desperate need for you this morning, in whatever season of life we find ourselves. And, we thank you in Jesus’ name, amen. 

So, the book of Daniel is an apocalyptic, hyper-political book. You may actually, what you probably know of Daniel, is - at the very least - you know the story of Shadrach, Meschach, and Abednego, which tends to be sort of the Sunday school story. But, the reality is, there’s a lot going on in the book of Daniel. It’s very apocalyptic, and it’s very political, and in the midst of it, Daniel sees a vision of four beasts coming up out of the sea, that were - it says later in verse 17 of chapter 7 of Daniel, they are identified as kings. These were kings, these were powers. And, I want to read that in Daniel … 

Daniel declared, “I saw in my vision by night, and behold, the four winds of heaven were stirring up the great sea. And four great beasts came up out of the sea, different from one another. The first was like a lion and had eagles’ wings. Then as I looked its wings were plucked off, and it was lifted up from the ground and made to stand on two feet like a man, and the mind of a man was given to it. And behold, another beast, a second one, like a bear. It was raised up on one side. It had three ribs in its mouth between its teeth; and it was told, ‘Arise, devour much flesh.’ After this I looked, and behold, another, like a leopard, with four wings of a bird on its back. And the beast had four heads, and dominion was given to it. After this I saw in the night visions, and behold, a fourth beast, terrifying and dreadful and exceedingly strong. It had great iron teeth; it devoured and broke in pieces and stamped what was left with its feet. It was different from all the beasts that were before it, and it had ten horns.

—Daniel 7:2-7 ESV

So, this vision comes. It’s identified, again, in verse 17, that these are powers, kings, these are nations that Daniel is foreseeing through this vision, that are going to come to power, and devour the world. The first one, most scholars agree, is Babylon, the Babylonian Empire a few hundred years before Jesus. The second would be the Medo Persian Empire, the third would be the Greeks and Alexander the Great, and then the fourth was the Roman Empire, which was the final climax of these world powers. The book of Mark is written some 30 odd years after the life of Jesus. And, it’s written, it’s audience is citizens of Rome, who were facing persecution and death under the brutal rule of Caesar Nero.

Mark wants his readers to make this connection, a connection between these narratives of calming the storm, and the Gerasene demoniac being delivered, he wants them to make a connection between these narratives, and their current persecuted reality under the reign of the powerful Roman empire. He wants them to see his power and goodness in the midst of the powerful evil they find themselves in, and he wants us to see the same thing this morning. No matter where we are in life, he wants us to see his power, and his goodness, and that’s what we see in the first narrative, a great power. 

I. A GREAT POWER 


So, Jesus has been teaching in parables, and on the power of the kingdom of God. I should say, remember that sea motif, that these beasts rose up out of the sea, because that’s going to come up in both narratives. There’s some connections there. Jesus has been teaching in parables. If you remember last week, Max, the last two weeks, Max has walked us through those. He’s been teaching in parables on the power of the kingdom of God, how the kingdom of God continues, that it’s this unstoppable force, it begins as a seed, a small seed, but nothing can stop it.

And, when he’s finished with this teaching, he’s teaching from the boat, kind of using the water and the embankment as an amphitheater, we’re told in verses 35 and 36, that they essentially take up the anchor, and begin to cross the sea of Galilee to the other side. And, it tells us that other boats accompany them, so they’re not by themselves, and as they’re crossing the Sea of Galilee - which was a lake on the north side of the region of Galilee, it was a lake that was seven miles wide, it was 13 miles long, so it was a large lake, it was even on the border of a sea, this lake, this sea, was also 700 feet below sea level, with mountains on both sides - not small mountains, big mountains on both sides. You can see them even today. Particularly, the eastern mountains are exceedingly tall. The tallest one is Mount Hermon, and it’s 9,200 feet above sea level. So, this means that that reality, the lake 700 feet below sea level, the mountains around it max out at around 9,200 feet, so what you get, all of you meteorologists out there like me, is the warm air rises, right, the cold air descends, and when those two meet, crazy stuff can happen. Storms can whip up really quick, and that is exactly what happens as Jesus and the disciples cross the sea of Galilee.

It should be noted, too, that the Jewish people were not seafaring people, naturally. It wasn’t in their history to be seafaring people. Now, we know they’ve adapted to some degree, because as Mark begins, Jesus is calling fishermen, people who are fishing on the sea of Galilee. So, they’ve made some adjustments, but historically, they are not vikings by any stretch of the imagination. They were 12 tribes from the desert that God brought into a home in the mediteranean.

Now, in the ancient near east, the sea had a dark symbolism, and you see this, actually, throughout scripture, from Genesis to Revelation. It had this dark symbolism, it was one of evil and chaos and demonic powers that were raging against  the creator. We see this in a few spots, some scriptures that point this out … 

“And darkness was over the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God was hovering over the face of the waters”

—Genesis 1:2 ESV

So, you get darkness and waters put together there in that text … 

Psalm 93 says, “The floods were lifted up …” We know floods are not a good thing … “Oh Lord, the Floods had lifted up their voice, the floods lift up their roaring, mightier than the thunders of many waters, mightier than the ways of the sea, the Lord on high is mighty …” 

And, what we just read …

“And four great beasts came up out of the sea, different from one another.”

—Daniel 7:3 ESV

And then finally, even at the end, even though this would not have been in view for the readers, then … 

“Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth, for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and the sea was no more.”

—Revelation 21:1 ESV

So, we get this picture throughout scripture. There are many, many more scriptures that if you were to just do kind of a biblical study of the word sea, you would see that it is fraught with chaos, and darkness. Suffice it to say, that when the Jewish people thought of the sea, they did not think of vacations, and drinks with umbrellas in them. What came to mind, was a clash of order and chaos, a place where God and evil rage against one another. Additionally, they were going to the other side, it says. They are heading into a Gentile region called Decapolis, which was basically a federation of 10 cities that was under Roman rule, and this means that they were leaving this place of covenant, this land of covenant, and coming into this - in the Jewish mind, what would have been this dark, evil place of Roman rule. 

So, you get the picture that this would have been a journey for the disciples of Jesus. And, as they’re crossing, the scripture there tells us … a  great windstorm arises … Now, we don’t know the exact boat they were in, but one of the most popular boats at the time was a 20 foot long boat, 7 feet wide, may or may not have had a sail, had oars. It could fit about 15 people. Most likely, they were traveling in something similar to that. What we need to get, is that it was not a ship, it was a boat, two very different things, especially when you’re in the midst of a hurricane. 

So, verse 37, we see that the waves begin crashing into the boat, and the boat begins to fill with water. Now, you can imagine at this moment, all of their fears are coming to be realized. The dark, ominous chaos of the water, the trip over not to the land of covenant, but the land of Roman rule, this dark place, and the darkness and the chaos comes to bear on them. And, in that moment, as their boat is filling with water and they are undoubtedly about to sink into the sea, into the chaos, in that moment they look to their teacher. They look for some comfort, for some assurance, because he’s the reason they’re out there.

Remember, they’re not  in the midst of the storm because they were disobedient. There are a lot of, actually, parallels, here, in the opposite direction, though, between Jonah and what’s happening here. A lot of scholars make that connection. But, what’s happening here is that they have followed Jesus. They haven’t run from him, they’ve followed Jesus, yet they find themselves in the midst of the storm. And, as they look to their great leader for comfort and assurance, they find him asleep on a cushion. Can you imagine that moment? Asleep on a cushion, because that’s what you do in the midst of a hurricane, when you’re in the sea. You just catch a little cat nap.

You can imagine that moment. And, often times, when we see the disciples’ interaction with Jesus, it’s easy for us in our arrogance to look at it and simply say, wow, they were really ignorant. Right? Sometimes - like an example - the sons of Zebedee go to Jesus and they’re like, Jesus, who’s going to be greatest in your kingdom? And, you’re reading it going, agh, really? You are such a knucklehead. Yet, we do it all the time, right? We do it in ways that we don’t even recognize. But, this is not one of those moments, where even in our arrogance we can look at it and go, why did they do that? 

I think this a perfectly reasonable question. Teacher, do you not care that we are perishing? Jesus is asleep in the midst of the storm, he’s gotten them into this trouble, and yet he doesn’t even seem to be concerned. Verse 39 tells us what happens … And he awoke and rebuked the wind and said to the sea, “Peace! Be still!” And the wind ceased, and there was a great calm … Jesus wakes up and he immediately rebukes the wind. He speaks to it as if it were a child, and where there once was a great storm, there is now a great calm. And, the sense is that even the water is calm, which you see Jesus’ power in that reality, if you think about a bunch of kids in a swimming pool, and they’re playing around, and then all of a sudden they get out, the water doesn’t immediately go calm, right? It says chopping. But, Jesus in his power calms the wind and he calms the waves. 

This story, in many ways, is very straight forward. We know the reality of storms, don’t we? It takes one phone call, one e-mail, one text message, one moment, and a sudden storm hits. Life can be like that, right? Evil, chaos, hits us out of nowhere. And, if you’re like the rest of us, or, I should say, if you’re like me, the disciples, the pattern of the disciples here looks very familiar. What’s the first thing we do when the storm hits? We freak out. Right? That’s the only rational thing to do, is freak out when the storm hits. What’s happening? And then, we question whether God really cares for us. I’m following you, how can you put me in the midst of this storm?

But, the story climaxes in a question. And, it climaxes in a question that feels like a cliffhanger, but it’s not because the answer is embedded in the story. It’s what Mark wants us to walk away with. As they continue, verse 40, he said to them … Why are you so afraid? Have you still no faith?” And they were filled with great fear and said to one another, “Who then is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him?” …


The opening line of Mark’s gospel reads … The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the son of God … scholars call this a messianic secret motif. All it means, is you’re in on something from the very beginning, that the rest of the players other than Christ, in the story, are not in on. You know from the get-go that this is the son of God, the one that was prophesied about in the Old Testament, that has, specifically in Isaiah, that has now come in the flesh. And, we know that, but at this point, the disciples were unaware of this reality. See, they think he’s just a rabbi, a really good teacher with an extra measure of God’s power. But, now, this is starting to look a little peculiar. They know that in the Hebrew scriptures, that only God has power over the sea. They know Psalm 107, which says … some went out into the sea in ships, and when the storm hits they cry out to Yahweh, and by his power, and his power alone, the waves are hushed … They know this. 

And, it’s also peculiar that Jesus doesn’t conjure. In other words, Jesus doesn’t call on a higher power. Like every other legend of antiquity, when they’re faced with this unmanageable, uncontrollable power, they conjure a higher power, Jesus doesn’t do that. Jesus speaks directly to the storm. See, he’s not calling on a higher power, because Mark wants us to see that he is the higher power. Remember, in the beginning in Genesis when darkness was over the face of the deep, and the spirit of God hovered over it, Jesus is saying, that was me, in the beginning, the creator. So, who then, is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him. And, the answer is, the creator of all things, with unmatched and unmanageable power, and the chaos of the sea is at my command. 

Point one … the great power. 

II. A GREAT COMPASSION

Next, we see, as we move to the next story - and then we’re going to bring these two together - is great compassion, or it might be said, a great good. Now, this next story, the Gerasene demoniac, takes place in decapolis, on the southeastern side of the sea. Again, it was a federation of 10 cities, first colonized by Alexander the Great, and during this particular time was conquered by the Roman empire. And, Jesus is unleashing the kingdom of God not just in Israel, but throughout the world. And, if you follow the trajectory of scripture, that is always the plan, that the earth will be filled with the knowledge of the glory of the Lord, which means that this gospel, this good news, this kingdom must go outside of Israel, it must go to the world, it must go to the Gentile nations. 

So, Jesus pushes through to bring his kingdom to the world, but there’s an anti-kingdom, there’s a dominion of darkness, and Jesus faces resistance from the moment he starts to go to the other side. First in the sea, and in the storm, and then in the demoniac. And, underneath this there’s a root of evil, a dark power that is at the source of this resistance. As Jesus enters into the Gentile territory, a man with an unclean spirit comes from the graveyard to meet him. Look at verses 2-6 … 

And when Jesus had stepped out of the boat, immediately there met him out of the tombs a man with an unclean spirit. He lived among the tombs. And no one could bind him anymore, not even with a chain, for he had often been bound with shackles and chains, but he wrenched the chains apart, and he broke the shackles in pieces. No one had the strength to subdue him. Night and day among the tombs and on the mountains he was always crying out and cutting himself with stones. And when he saw Jesus from afar, he ran and fell down before him. And crying out with a loud voice, he said, “What have you to do with me, Jesus, Son of the Most High God? I adjure you by God, do not torment me.” …

It’s a pretty bleak picture of this man’s existence, isn’t it? Now, I feel like we have to take a moment to do a little bit of work, because it would be very easy for us in this western culture, in this particular time, to keep this story at distance, to keep this story at arm’s length, to simply say it’s a superstitious sort of phenomenon that belongs in antiquity, that belongs in another time. When, culturally, we function as if what is real is only what can be tested and poked and prodded in a laboratory. If we say we believe in a supernatural and personal, good God, then it is no leap at all to say we believe in a personal and supernatural evil. In fact, it follows.

In the biblical worldview, the fact is, the universe is teeming with activity that cannot necessarily be tested. Listen to what Paul says here in Ephesians, and I want you to remember, Paul has been talking in this letter about how to walk in love, how wives and husbands are to love one another and lay down their lives. He’s been talking about the new life in Christ, unity in the body, some very practical things here, loving one another. And then, as he gets to the end of this letter, he brings us to what might be a strange place to us. Look here at Ephesians 6:10-16 …

“Finally, be strong in the Lord and in the strength of his might. Put on the whole armor of God, that you may be able to stand against the schemes of the devil. For we do not wrestle against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the cosmic powers over this present darkness, against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly places. Therefore take up the whole armor of God, that you may be able to withstand in the evil day, and having done all, to stand firm. Stand therefore, having fastened on the belt of truth, and having put on the breastplate of righteousness, and, as shoes for your feet, having put on the readiness given by the gospel of peace. In all circumstances … [does that include your circumstance? Yes.] … take up the shield of faith, with which you can extinguish all the flaming darts of the evil one.”

—Ephesians 6:10-16 ESV

In all circumstances. Do you hear what Paul is saying? In the midst of a letter where he has been very practical, husbands, love your wives, church, you are one body, live into that reality. He’s saying, do not lose sight that there is a world, here, teeming with spiritual forces that have schemes that are seeking to disrupt. See, what scripture tells us is that inbetween the creator God, a being with no equal and the seven billion plus people on the earth, there is an invisible world filled with spiritual beings, with angels, with demons. Some of these are in league with the creator, working to usher in God’s kingdom, but others are at war with the creator, and wreaking havoc wherever they can. 

The biblical understanding of demons, though, is not a simple one or a superstitious one, or a naive one. Rather, it’s complex, and it’s multidimensional. I know we’ve seen Poltergeist and people’s head spinning, and we have things that come to mind when we hear this stuff, but if you look at the totality of scripture and how it reveals to us the reality of sin and our struggle, it is not reductionary at all. Certain worldviews tend to be reductionary, we tend to reduce our problems to one aspect, maybe it’s physical, you’re probably is just physical. I heard the phrase this week, I guess it’s a new thing, I need to do a geographical … and what that means is, like, where I live is not working out for me, so I need to move somewhere, right? So i’m going to do a geographical. The problem is, as one really wise person said, everywhere you go, there you are. So, you can do the geographical, but you’re still there. 

But, we tend to reduce things in that way. Physical, or mental, or moralistic, your problem is just guilt and shame, you need to deal with that, or spiritual, it’s only spiritual, and we see demons everywhere. True story, when my mother first came to Christ, neither one of us were believers, later in life she was trying to find churches, and she was in deep south Louisiana, and she went to a church, and they told her she had a chocolate demon, and they tried to cast it out of her. So, talk about reductionary. I’m like … I think i have one of those, if that’s a thing … I’m going to come see you guys … 

So, we tend to be reductionistic in our worldviews, but scripture is not this way. Scripture gives weight to each one of these realities, mental, moral, physical, spiritual, all of the above, they’re all interlocking. And, therefore, there’s no one template. But, I think in our culture, what we’re the quickest to dismiss, is this particular world, this world of principalities and powers, where Paul says, you’re not wrestling against what you think you’re wrestling against. 

See, if we reject personal spiritual evil, we will be blind to a significant power at work that stirs up our struggle, and stirs up our sin, and creates chaos. See, we see demon possessed, and we go, oh, I’m good. I’m cool. There is none of me in this guy. I mean, he’s … and, when you read the description, it’s easy to put distance between us and him. What’s interesting, is that the Greek words that describe this state never actually use the word possession. It’s essentially the word for demonize, over and over and over again. So, I know there’s been a lot of debate around categories and oppression and possession, but as I dig into the text, into scripture, and there’s definitely a place for those conversations, but what I see is there’s more this influence at work that we need to be awake to.

Don’t forget, though, what Paul is saying. Essentially, he gets to … so, if we’re proud, if we’re self centered, if we’re angry, and these things are taking root in us, and there’s bitterness in us, make no mistake that there is some aspect of influence going on there. See, our struggles - this will really unsettle us - our struggles are not so much different from the demoniac in kind, but in degree. His patterns even are probably familiar. I know they are for me.

When I tend to go in a difficult place, a dark place, what do we see in the demoniac’s life, the way he was living? We see isolation. Don’t we tend to want to be left alone? We don’t want anyone talking to us, I don’t want to hear your Jesus stuff, just leave me alone, let me binge on Netflix, or put my head under the covers, right? Just leave me alone. Or, we’re in bondage, right? Perhaps there’s sin that we’ve been struggling with for years, and we find ourselves not able to see that bondage broken. Even harming himself. Now, there is a very overt way, he’s cutting himself with stones. That happens in different ways today, but there are other ways we tend to do that, right? We tend to harm ourselves through things like binge eating, or things that we run to, that we know are not good for us, but we run to those things for comfort. Make no mistake, Paul is saying in every circumstance, be on guard. There are schemes at work. So, we are not as different from the demoniac as we might like to believe.

Now, how do we see the goodness of Jesus? We said this about compassion, and it is. The goodness of Jesus is demonstrated in that he goes to the worst of the worst. He goes to a man that feels so far gone, compared to perhaps where we are, and he does that with intention, he does that with purpose, he does that because he wants us to see that we have hope, that where we, and our station in life, whatever these schemes are that are at work, that we are not too far gone, that his goodness is not present with us in the midst of it, and that his power is not strong enough to rescue us. He comes to the worst of the worst, the most vile, the most detestable, the most unclean in a graveyard, the place that a Jewish person would never go. Jesus goes to the depth with this man so that you and I might have hope from our depths.

And, there’s another layer here that’s happening. Notice he asks in verse 9 … what is your name? … and the answer is … my name is Legion, for we are many … A legion was the largest Roman military unit. It would have been about 5 or 6,000 people at this time, and they were known for their brutality and their destruction. So, we begin to see allusions and connections that would have been made for those early readers, that perhaps are lost on us. They see, okay, we’re seeing power over Rome, we’re seeing goodness in the midst of it, coming to rescue, and we’re seeing power over it, even the strange reality of the pigs, right? I mean, this is a strange story, there’s no doubt. Look what happens … 

And he begged him earnestly not to send them out of the country. Now a great herd of pigs was feeding there on the hillside, and they begged him, saying, “Send us to the pigs; let us enter them.” So he gave them permission. And the unclean spirits came out and entered the pigs; and the herd, numbering about two thousand, rushed down the steep bank into the sea and drowned in the sea … 

Do you see the connection? Do you see, in Daniel, he says this power is coming, and it is a great power, and it is going to engulf the world, and here we see Jesus coming in the midst of this power, in the midst of this legion, and he brings redemption, and he brings healing, and he brings restoration, and then he demonstrates his power. Even with the pigs, there was a Gerasen that the Roman legion had, where their actual mascot, essentially, was a wild boar, because the Jewish people called the Romans pigs, and so what they did to kind of get back at them, is they said fine, we’ll raise the flag, we’ll be your pigs. So, there’s some real connections here that would have been made that show Christ’s power over what seems to be the most unmanageable power in the world. 

And then, finally, I love towards the end the picture of the healing that happens in verse 15 … 

And they came to Jesus and saw the demon-possessed man, the one who had had the legion, sitting there, clothed and in his right mind, and they were afraid … 

Could you imagine this man that far gone, no longer able to be subdued, living among the graves, cutting himself, he is sitting - not naked - but clothed, not completely gone mentally, but present in his right mind. This is the holistic, deep healing of Jesus. This is the goodness of God at work, and if there is hope for him, there’s hope for you, there’s hope for me wherever we find ourselves.

And, finally, the man wants to go with Jesus. And, it’s interesting, Jesus doesn’t let him. Isn’t Jesus the one who says, come follow me? Yet, he says, no, actually. Look what he tells him in verse 19 … 

… And he did not permit him but said to him, “Go home to your friends and tell them how much the Lord has done for you, and how he has had mercy on you.” And he went away and began to proclaim in the Decapolis how much Jesus had done for him, and everyone marveled … 

See, Jesus is not safe, but he is good. Remember, Jesus has been run out of town. 2,000 pigs were killed. That’s no small thing. That had serious economic consequences for the people of Decapolis, and they ran him out of town because of it, and Jesus says, no, you’re not coming with me, you’re going to stay in the midst of that and declare my goodness. He is not safe, but he is good. He says, tell what the Lord - Yahweh - has done for you, and notice in verse 20, he tells how much Jesus has done for him, the creator and Jesus are one and the same. See, we are back to the power and authority of Jesus, which leads us to the last point here … a great fear. 

III. A GREAT FEAR

If you notice, throughout both narratives, there is fear woven throughout it. Notice 4:38, there’s fear of the storm, in chapter 4:41, fear of Jesus’ power to calm the storm. It’s funny, before Jesus calms the storm, they’re scared, but after they’re more scared. Fear of the demoniac is not explicit, but no one had the strength to subdue him, it says, in 4:5. The demon’s fear of Jesus’ power over them, in verse 7 … do not torment me … fear of Jesus’ power to heal the demoniac, in 5:15. They don’t rejoice when they see this man in his right man and clothed, they fear. 

Why? Why is there fear throughout both of these stories when there should be, it seems, rejoicing? Because, fear rises when we find ourselves in the midst of a power we cannot control. The difference between the power of the storm, the power of the demoniac, and the power of Christ, is that only one of those loves you, is that only one of those cares for us. See, the storm, the principalities and powers are not good, and therefore don’t have your good in mind, but the one who has power over them does. He is good, and he has your good in mind. 

Notice in verse 40 of the narrative of calming the storm, Jesus has been questioned. Jesus, don’t you care about us? Don’t you see what’s happening? But, notice that the questioned becomes the questioner, and he asks them in verse 40 … Why are you so afraid? Have you still no faith? … And, here’s where the power and goodness of God come to bear in our lives. He’s saying, essentially, if you knew I loved you, and if you knew my infinite power, you could have been calm in the storm. He’s saying, I can still care for you and allow you to go through storms. The issue is, your premise is wrong. And, I would submit to you today, that oftentimes our premise is wrong. The premise is wrong. You don’t see me for truly who I am.

Our premise tends to be, if you love us, you wouldn’t let us go through storms. But, that’s a false premise. Jesus says, I’m God, and I know better than you, and I am not safe, but I am good. So, I think part of what comes to bear for us, is when we find ourselves in the middle of the storm, wake him, ask him if he cares for you, but don’t be surprised when the questioned becomes the questioner, when God questions us. See, Mark’s invitation for us is to turn from questioning God, to answering God’s question. In light of such authority and power, and care, why are you so afraid? Why do you still have no faith? Do you see how Jesus is demonstrating both his authority and his goodness?

See, in the Gerasene demoniac, Jesus goes to the worst of the worst, and when he was done, he was clothed and in his right mind. But, Jesus goes one step further, so that we might have an immovable reminder of his power and his goodness. When we get to the end of the book of Mark, we see that Jesus exchanges places with this man. Jesus, as he goes to the cross, is now naked. Jesus, as he goes to the cross, is now crying out and bleeding. Jesus is driven to the tomb. That’s how Jesus dealt with evil, that’s how Jesus deals with evil today, not with the sword, but by taking evil upon himself, so that he could wipe out evil without wiping out us.

In the cross of Christ, we have a fixed and perpetual reminder of his power and his goodness. See, if Jesus were not powerful, the cross would have no efficacy. It would have no effect in our lives. If he were not good, he never would have gone to the cross in the first place. And, here is where it all comes to bear for us, this morning, as God’s people in light of his word. See, if we believe he is powerful, but not good, we are driven away from him. If we believe he is good, but not powerful, we are driven to pity him. But, if we believe he is good and powerful, we are driven to trust him in any and every season of life, and that is the invitation of our text this morning, and that’s the thrust of the invitation as we come to the communion table. Let’s pray. 

Jesus,

We are grateful that in every season of life, we have a fixed and perpetual reminder of your goodness to us, of your power that is unmatched and unmanageable. Lord, I know there are many storms brewing in each of our lives today. Really, there’s never a season where there’s not some kind of storm, whether it’s a great one or a mild one, Lord, in the midst of this fallen world, sudden storms are normal. So, Lord, we ask this morning in the midst of our storms, Lord, we ask that we would see your great power, and your great goodness. Lord, may we never see our circumstances are more powerful than you, and may we never see our circumstances as undermining your goodness. Lord, we are grateful this morning for this beauty, we are grateful this morning for this truth. Lord, as we come to the table, Lord, may we come believing, trusting, renewing our faith by your Spirit, that you are good, and you are all powerful. I pray that every heart in this room would find rest in that truth. We ask in Jesus’ name, amen.


Parables of the Kingdom Part 2-Full Sermon Transcript

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PASTOR: MAX STERNJACOB 

SCRIPTURE READING

A Lamp Under a Basket

And he said to them, “Is a lamp brought in to be put under a basket, or under a bed, and not on a stand? For nothing is hidden except to be made manifest; nor is anything secret except to come to light. If anyone has ears to hear, let him hear.” And he said to them, “Pay attention to what you hear: with the measure you use, it will be measured to you, and still more will be added to you. For to the one who has, more will be given, and from the one who has not, even what he has will be taken away.”

The Parable of the Seed Growing

And he said, “The kingdom of God is as if a man should scatter seed on the ground. He sleeps and rises night and day, and the seed sprouts and grows; he knows not how. The earth produces by itself, first the blade, then the ear, then the full grain in the ear. But when the grain is ripe, at once he puts in the sickle, because the harvest has come.”

The Parable of the Mustard Seed

And he said, “With what can we compare the kingdom of God, or what parable shall we use for it? It is like a grain of mustard seed, which, when sown on the ground, is the smallest of all the seeds on earth, yet when it is sown it grows up and becomes larger than all the garden plants and puts out large branches, so that the birds of the air can make nests in its shade.” 

With many such parables he spoke the word to them, as they were able to hear it. He did not speak to them without a parable, but privately to his own disciples he explained everything.

—Mark 4:21-34 ESV

INTRO

Good morning, Emmaus. My name is Max, I am one of the pastors here at Emmaus, and I am excited to bring you round two of the parables of the kingdom. If you’ve been with us, we’ve been working our way through the gospel of Mark, as we were just talking about, get those journals, get your guide, and follow along with us. But, all up through chapter 4, Mark has been giving us glimpses and little insights here and there, that the message of Jesus, in a nutshell, could be described as saying that the kingdom of God has come, the kingdom of God is near. However, there hasn’t been much discussion about explaining what that kingdom is, until we get to chapter 4, where Jesus starts telling parables. 

And, when he does start speaking in parables, we see in the previous parable, the parable of the soils, that in the explanation of that parable, Jesus actually quotes Isaiah 6, which on the surface kind of sounds like Jesus is saying he’s purposefully trying to make it difficult for people to actually hear him and understand him. But, as we should do always, we should let scripture interpret scripture, and the parable that’s right after the parable of the soils, he starts by talking about light, by talking about a light that’s set on a stand, and not hidden. And, just as it would be silly for someone to take a lamp and hide it under a bed, or a basket, or a bowl, Jesus is saying that, no, the kingdom is actually on display, and it’s supposed to be revealed, and it’s supposed to be known, and experienced. And so, I hope this morning, what we can accomplish by looking at this smattering of various parables in the latter half of chapter 4, is to start to see what Jesus’ big themes are about the kingdom, what is it like, what is it like for us to experience it, and how can we know if it’s actually here. So, would you pray with me, and let’s jump into Mark chapter 4. 

Father, 

We recognize that the beauty of your word is that we can study it our whole lives and never come to its depths. And so, we ask, today, that you would allow us just one more step in better understanding who you are, and better understanding who we are, and better understanding your kingdom. Would you use Jesus’ words here to cut through to our soul, and to help us to see your kingdom, and to live in your kingdom in a more profound way than when we came. God, help me to explain your words accurately and faithfully. I need your help, would you please give it, and would you help my friends and my family in this room to help us to hear, as Jesus says, to have ears to hear. In Jesus’ good name, amen. 

So, we’re going to be jumping through these parables together, and I think there’s just three straightforward themes that permeate all three of these parables that Jesus uses here, and that is these - that the light of Jesus will not be hidden, that God will see to it that His Kingdom grows, and that God’s kingdom starts small, and grows large.

Mark 4:21 … And he said to them, “Is a lamp brought in to be put under a basket, or under a bed, and not on a stand? For nothing is hidden except to be made manifest; nor is anything secret except to come to light. If anyone has ears to hear, let him hear.” And he said to them, “Pay attention to what you hear: with the measure you use, it will be measured to you, and still more will be added to you. For to the one who has, more will be given, and from the one who has not, even what he has will be taken away.” … 

See, before we jump into these series of parables, we want to remember the parable of the soils that came right before it. If you were with us last week, we talked about the fact that God’s miraculous yield in that parable is kind of the point. The point that Jesus is trying to make, is that 25% of the seed that goes out produces a yield of 100 fold, which is just, in that day, no one ever had that kind of return. And now, Jesus is saying, the light that is coming is having an effect, but it’s having an effect similar to the parable we just talked about in the parable of the soils, is that what happens is the light comes, but there’s not an immediate effect. There’s not an immediate result. If you were with us last week, we talked about that the roots grow first, and the roots grow in a way that’s unseen. See, the patience and slowness, and the steadiness of the kingdom is coming, because that is the healthiest kind of growth. 

And, I think as I was reading and studying Mark, one of the things that came up, is there’s a man named William Carey. Have you guys heard of William Carey before? He’s actually known as the father of modern missions. He was a missionary to India. In fact, if you’re interested, I got most of this information from a biography, that we actually have in our lending library, and it just goes through his whole life. And, one of the things about William Carey, is that he actually repeatedly, in his life, came back to this passage in Mark, and the similar cross references that we have in Matthew and Luke, of this parable of the light that’s on display. And, it was one of those things that fed his entire life and ministry. He’s constantly talking about that his job was to put God’s light on display for the world.

And, his life was kind of interesting. As he was preparing to become ordained, he actually failed twice. He went through all of the steps and went to school, and then he had to go preach a sermon, and he preached a sermon, and they cut him. They said, nope, come back later. And, after years of studying, he finally got ordained, and then he decided … I’m going to go to India. And, as he goes to India, he served as a missionary faithfully for seven years before he had his first conversion. Seven years of faithful work before he saw any fruit. And, William Carey used this passage of the gospels to fuel his life and ministry, to say, that is exactly what we’re doing. We put Jesus Christs’ light on display, we sow seeds faithfully, and the growth is up to God. 

I. THE LIGHT OF JESUS WILL NOT BE HIDDEN (Mark 4:21-25)

See, what Jesus is about to get into, here, is to talk about subverting our expectations about what kingdoms are like, and especially what God’s kingdom is like. And, he does that by saying, first and foremost, a parable of the light. And, Jesus says, Jesus’ light will not be hidden. Now, the first point, there, that Jesus makes is that if you hide the light, you misuse it. If you hide it, you misuse it. Verse 21 …  “Is a lamp brought in to be put under a basket, or under a bed, and not on a stand? For nothing is hidden except to be made manifest; nor is anything secret except to come to light. If anyone has ears to hear, let him hear.” …  Now, remember, in that day, the light was fire, right? It wasn’t just a battery operated flashlight that you could turn on and off. So, you can imagine that for him to say, if you brought in a lamp and put it under your bed … what’s going to happen? What happens if you put it under a basket? What were baskets made out of? Both their beds and their baskets were flammable, right? So, he says, if you take the light and try to hide it, you’re misusing it. And, not only are you misusing it, because the light was brought in so that you could see, but if you misuse it, it’s going to go bad for you, right? You’re going to cause damage. You’re going to burn something down. 


Jesus is saying that if you hide it, you misuse it. See, in those days when you did not have electricity, and you did not have flashlights, and all you had was fire, flame, to light and illumine things at night, you start to see real quickly how light and darkness became a very vivid metaphor for Jesus to use, because if you did not have any sort of flame, and you were inside a house, you were literally in utter darkness, right? You had nothing to see by. Light is necessary for life, not just so that you can move around, but, you know, I was reading in some of the books that my kids enjoy reading about the nature, and the food chain, and it has this chart, and it shows the food chain, and at the bottom of the food chain is phytoplankton. It’s the smallest little tiny microscopic creatures that little tiny fish eat, and then bigger fish eat those fish, right? But, actually, what’s not on that chart, I was realizing, is the sun. Right? Because, the only reason why the phytoplankton at the base of the food chain can exist is cause there’s light that fuels them. Light fuels creation. Our whole creation is dependent on light. It creates the seasons, it has power, and Jesus is saying that, likewise, the light of the kingdom is necessary for light, and you misuse it when you hide it. 

See, and the purpose of light is not just to sustain creation, but you and me, we need light. We can’t see without light, and the purpose of light is to reveal things for us to be able to see. I don’t know if you’ve ever had this happen, but when I used to work for the county, we had to wear boots, and we also had to keep our boots looking shiny. And, I had bought a new pair of boots once, and I had shined them all up, ready to wear for the first time for my shift, and I also had a pair of brown boots for working around the house. And, I had to get up for my shift early in the morning, it was dark, and I didn’t like to turn on lights, and so I literally went, I was tired, and I forgot that I was supposed to be wearing my new boots. But, what ended up happening is that I grabbed the left brown boot, and then I grabbed the right black boot, I put them on, and then I went to work. And, when I got to the locker room to change, I look down, and I go … oh no. Right? I mean, and I didn’t have any other boots. So, that day I worked my shift with a brown boot and a black boot on, and I got many, many comments about that. 

But, without light, we can’t see. Without light, we make mistakes, we make mismatches, right? We can’t see without the light. So, Jesus is talking about a misuse of the light, and what light is for, and then he turns and he makes a statement here that is actually pretty significant. It’s actually scary. What does he say? Look at Mark 4:24 … And he said to them, “Pay attention to what you hear: with the measure you use, it will be measured to you, and still more will be added to you. For to the one who has, more will be given, and from the one who has not, even what he has will be taken away.” … 

Sounds like a warning to me. What is he warning us of? Well, I think what he’s trying to get at, here he’s warning us that you can misuse light, but if you misuse it, you will lose it. If you hide the light of Jesus - because Jesus says if you try to hide the light of his kingdom, Jesus says you will actually lose his kingdom altogether. If you hide it, you will lose it. See, the people of Israel, that were hearing Jesus, and the religious leaders who had already, clearly, up until Mark chapter 4, we’ve seen it again and again, their conflict with Jesus, the tension that he had with them, they had some light. They had some of the revelation of God about who he was, and what he was like, and what he was doing in the world. But, they use that light, they use that revelation about God’s kingdom to segregate themselves from the nations, to pit themselves against God’s creation, and to actually use it to prop themselves up instead of God. And, they also used it to reject God’s message in the prophets, and now they’re using that same volition that God had given them, to reject Jesus himself. Right? 

Right before this is the blasphemy of the Holy Spirit, right? And, they use the knowledge they had about God’s creation, about angels and demons, and they said, God is against Jesus, because Jesus is doing these miraculous things by the power of Satan. So, they actually use the revelation that God had given them about the way the world and the universe worked, not to actually receive the kingdom of God, but to actually condemn what God was doing. They hid it, and Jesus is saying, you’re on a trajectory to lose it. He says, to the one who has, more will be given. But, to the one who has not, even what you have will be taken away. He is telling his hearers that, though you may have some light, if you reject me, even what you have will be taken away. That’s a powerful thing, isn’t it? 

Jesus is saying something very substantial here, and we should not just gloss over it, and say, well, that was for them. Because, for us, we stand many years removed from this original talk, this original parable, and we have more revelation than they had, than the original hearers. And so, if we reject Jesus with even more of that light, how much more are we liable, how much more do we condemn ourselves for the rejection and the misuse of the light of Jesus and his kingdom?

See, Jesus says elsewhere in the gospels, something that is very important to hear. He elsewhere, in John chapter 8, says … I am the light of the world … and, in Matthew 5 … you are the light of the world … What is he talking about here? Well, I went to Biola University for my undergrad, and when I was there they were building a new library, which made it kind of fun because the old library wasn’t really in use, and the new library wasn’t in use, so they literally just had, like, a basement with books in it, and good luck trying to find things in there. But, it finally did open, and as their project completed, I remember the first time I walked into the building. I actually have a picture of it, and this is the front of the library. And, when you walked in, it says … I am the light of the world … And then, when you go in and you come back out, it says … You are the light of the world … And, I remember walking into that library, and that made an impression on me, that there’s something to be said, that when we come to Christ, we come to him because he is the light of the world, but then he sends us out, as light, and we hear that in John 8 and Matthew 5. 

And, when Jesus talks about himself, and says .... I am the light of the world … What he’s saying there is that, you have no other option than to live by what I say, because he’s the light. See, Jesus doesn’t just say, I’m pointing to the light. He’s saying, he is the way, he is the light itself. Come. And, if Jesus is not that, if when Jesus says, I am the light, we go … well, maybe that is a little bit of an overstatement … if Jesus is not actually the true light, then he is utter darkness, because he is lying, and that’s what darkness is. See, we’re faced here right away, after the parable of the sowers, Jesus jumps right in and says, there is no middle ground. Either you see me as the light that will illuminate God’s kingdom, and you receive it and use it the way it was meant to be used, or else you reject it, and you will lose even what you have. 

See, what does he mean, though, when he says, now you are the light of the world? Is he saying that now we all become little saviors to everybody? No. I think what he means, is that we take on Jesus’ character. We take on the revelatory character of Jesus, because Christians go into the world because they are a part of a new kingdom, and they start to reveal things. They start to shine the light of the kingdom in dark places. They start to point out the mismatches, right? They start to say, your shoes don’t match. That is not the right way to do that. Right? 

See, God uses us to bring the light of his kingdom, to bring the imperfections and the sin that exists in our world, to ultimately point people to the true light. That’s our job. But, as we know, have you ever tried to start a fire without matches? We know that fire has to have some kind of an external source, right? Things don’t just spontaneously combust. There has to be a flame, fire, or a heat from outside that causes things to light, and it’s the same with us, is it not? When Jesus says elsewhere in the gospels that you are the light of the world, he does not mean you need to go rub some sticks together. He says, I will make you the light. I will bring the fire, right? And we see that he does, right? In Acts. The Spirit of God comes with fire, and regenerates his people, and makes his church, and sends them out. 

See, God alone is the only one that can do that. And, we know that we’re on the right track in interpreting these parables, because that was the point of the parable of the sowers, that’s the point of the parable of the light, and now we see that not only has Jesus’ current teaching illuminated that, but the whole of the old testament also talks this way. If you really want to understand Mark, if you went to the Bible workshops with Pastor Matt, he did a great job of this, but you’ve got to understand the Old Testament, particularly, you’ve got to understand Isaiah. Because the book of Mark starts with saying that Jesus’ life and ministry is the fulfillment of everything that Isaiah talked about. And, Isaiah chapter 60, verse 1-5, it captures from the Old Testament, God’s plan for his kingdom. And, I want to read it to you because this is exactly the heritage that we have. And, the reason why you’re in this room right now is because Jesus was the fulfillment of the Old Testament. Let me read it to you … 

Arise, shine, for your light has come, 

and the glory of the Lord has risen upon you. 

For behold, darkness shall cover the earth, 

and thick darkness the peoples; 

but the Lord will arise upon you, 

and his glory will be seen upon you. 

And nations shall come to your light, 

and kings to the brightness of your rising. 

Lift up your eyes all around, and see; 

they all gather together, they come to you; 

your sons shall come from afar, 

and your daughters shall be carried on the hip. 

Then you shall see and be radiant; 

your heart shall thrill and exult,[a] 

because the abundance of the sea shall be turned to you, 

the wealth of the nations shall come to you.

—Isaiah 60:1-5 ESV

See, all of the Old Testament is pointing to the fulfillment of what Jesus is doing right here. Jesus comes, and he says, God’s kingdom is now coming, and is near to you now, and everything that God promised that he would do for his people, he is doing. And, what’s the point of all of this in Isaiah 60? He says that I will make you bright, I will put my glory on you, and people will see your brightness, and what will happen? They will respond, and they will come and worship God because of you. They will come, the nations will come, and they’ll come bringing their treasures. They’ll come bringing their people. They will come into my kingdom because of the work that I am doing in you, by you being reflectors of my light. 

See, God’s kingdom is growing, right? See, creation, fall, redemption, restoration, right? God is doing something, and God sees to it that his kingdom will grow, and that’s our next theme here.

II. GOD WILL SEE TO IT THAT HIS KINGDOM GROWS (Mark 4:26-29)

Let’s read the next section here … 

And he said, “The kingdom of God is as if a man should scatter seed on the ground. He sleeps and rises night and day, and the seed sprouts and grows; he knows not how. The earth produces by itself, first the blade, then the ear, then the full grain in the ear. But when the grain is ripe, at once he puts in the sickle, because the harvest has come.” …

See, Jesus here is saying that God is doing something, his kingdom is growing, and look at the reaction of the man. He doesn’t know how it’s happening. Right? We mentioned last week if you were with us, that all peoples in the ancient near east saw agriculture, saw growing things as some sort of divine action. And, everyone basically had a god that they would attribute that to. Jesus is saying that the true God, Yahweh, is the one who is behind that. We do not know how things grow. Sure, we might be able to have the steps, we know DNA is involved in there somewhere. But, really, when you think about it, the mystery of something that could start as a seed and grow into a giant, you know, redwood tree, it’s a miraculous thing, right? That, everything that that large 300 foot tree is, is in this. And, Jesus is saying that God will see to his growth, and it’s miraculous when it happens. We saw that in the parable of the sowers, we’re seeing that here, that the farmer goes out, sows the seed, and he knows not how. 

There’s a mystery to it. There’s a mystery of the growth of the kingdom. Something is happening. I don’t know if you’ve ever reseeded your lawn. You go out, and you roto till the dirt, and you fertilize the dirt, and you go out there and you throw all the seed, and then you water like crazy, and then you water like crazy, and you water more, and a day goes by, and a day goes by, and a day goes by, and then you go out there and you get down on your hands and knees and you’re like … uh … nothing. And then, you water some more, you go to sleep, you repeat, you repeat, you keep doing it, and all of a sudden you go out, and what happens? Between literally one day and the next day, all of a sudden there’s a slight tinge of green on the lawn. How did that happen?

See, something was happening, you just couldn’t see it. Then, all of a sudden we see it. We know that roots grow first, right? Then shoots, then trees, then forests. It’s the already and not yet of the kingdom, right? Jesus is saying here, there’s a parable, here, of a man that goes out and sows seed, and as sure as that seed will grow, there’s a certainty to it, there’s a mystery to it, it’s happening, it just hasn’t been seen yet. It just hasn’t come into its fullness yet, but it’s going to happen. The dominoes are falling. It’s only a matter of time.

See, the kingdom is here, Jesus says, the kingdom is here, but it’s not fully realized. It’s already here, but it’s not yet completed. We don’t know how God is going to use our obedience, we don’t know when it will fully be ushered in, but we keep working. We keep going. We keep watering. It’s our little acts of obedience. There’s a certainty to it, right? The man just assumes, I need to go out and water, because something is going to happen. And, what we see here, is there’s a routine, right? There’s a, I go to bed, and I get up, and I keep watering, I keep planting, I keep sowing, and all of a sudden it grows, and it when it grows, he doesn’t know how. So, even though there’s a mystery to it, even though there is something we don’t fully understand, there is a certainly to it, is there not? 

Elsewhere in scripture we read about this. In James chapter 5:7-8, he writes to his friends … 

Be patient, therefore, brothers, until the coming of the Lord. See how the farmer waits for the precious fruit of the earth, being patient about it, until it receives the early and the late rains. You also, be patient. Establish your hearts, for the coming of the Lord is at hand.

—James 5:7-8 ESV

So, he says just like a farmer needs to be patient, you need to be patient. We know that God’s done something, we know that he is doing something, and we know that he will do something. But, for you, you need to be patient. And, we mentioned this passage last week in 1 Corinthians 3, where the church that Paul’s writing to in Corinth is struggling with conflicts, and one of the major conflicts is basically kind of a celebrity culture, if you will, where they’re all kind of saying, well I’m a disciple of Peter, and I’m a disciple of Paul, and I’m a disciple of Apollos, and Paul writes to them and says … don’t you understand that we’re all supposed to be disciples of Jesus? And, he says in 1 Corinthians 3:6-9 … 

I planted, Apollos watered, but God gave the growth. So neither he who plants nor he who waters is anything, but only God who gives the growth. He who plants and he who waters are one, and each will receive his wages according to his labor. For we are God’s fellow workers. You are God’s field, God’s building.

—1 Corinthians 3:6-9 ESV

See, Paul is reminding his hearers the same kind of tone and message that Jesus is giving here in the parable, is that you plant, you water, but God causes the growth. The fruit springs up, and we know not how. See, it’s slow.

And, one thing that struck me as I was reading this, is that it says he sleeps. I want to ask you something. How is it that he can sleep? Do you guys have trouble sleeping? He sleeps, because he has a confidence, right? He sleeps, because he knows that he doesn’t have to solve all the problems. Do you have trouble sleeping? Why do you have trouble sleeping? I would submit to you that you have trouble sleeping, because you think you have something more that you’re supposed to be doing, right? You can’t get a good night’s sleep because your conscience isn’t clear. You can’t sleep because you think you have God’s job, right? This parable says he plants, he takes care of it, and then he goes to sleep. He’s not up worrying about it, because he’s confident that God is going to do his work, that he does not need to take God’s job back from him and worry about it. 

See, what would it look like for you to actually go to bed tonight, and not worry that you have to somehow have God’s job on all the things that are affecting you? What would that look like? See, Jesus is getting at something here that we need to understand, that his light will not be hidden. There’s a warning about it being taken away. We need to see that God will see to it that his light and that his kingdom grows, but we also need to understand - which Jesus explains to us in the next parable - that though it may start small, it will grow large. Jesus’ kingdom starts small, and grows large. Look at Mark 4:30 … 

III. THE KINGDOM OF GOD STARTS SMALL AND GROWS LARGE (Mark 4:30-34)

And he said, “With what can we compare the kingdom of God, or what parable shall we use for it? It is like a grain of mustard seed, which, when sown on the ground, is the smallest of all the seeds on earth, yet when it is sown it grows up and becomes larger than all the garden plants and puts out large branches, so that the birds of the air can make nests in its shade.”

—Mark 4:30-32 ESV


See, Jesus compares the kingdom to a mustard seed, but more importantly, he doesn’t just say, it’s like a mustard seed. He’s comparing to what a mustard seed does. That’s the real parable. He’s not just saying that the kingdom is small, although there is part of that. Because, at this point, there’s only 12 of them, right? But, he says, it’s not just about the smallness, it’s about what happens to it. Well, it grows large, and it grows miraculously, just like the parable of the sowers. In fact, it grows so large that the birds of the air come to rest in it. In fact, it’s something interesting when you read Matthew 13 and Luke 13, they’re the same parable but there’s a little twist, and I want to read it to you, and I want you to see if you catch it … 

He put another parable before them, saying, “The kingdom of heaven is like a grain of mustard seed that a man took and sowed in his field. It is the smallest of all seeds, but when it has grown it is larger than all the garden plants and becomes a tree, so that the birds of the air come and make nests in its branches.”

—Matthew 13:31 ESV

See, what Matthew and Luke both say here, a little bit different than Mark, but I think they’re getting at the heart of what Jesus is trying to say here, is that the miraculous growth of the kingdom is something that started out small, and grows large, but it’s not just that it grows large, it actually becomes something different. Mark points out here, that it’s one of the largest garden plants, or better translated here, maybe an herb. And, mustard plants do get large. They get about maybe 12 feet tall. But, Matthew and Luke say it actually becomes something different, it transforms from an herb to a tree. And, only God can take something in its nature and change it, right? He says it changes into a tree so that the birds of the tree come and make their nests in its branches. 

See, Jesus is trying to say something about the nature of the kingdom here. He’s saying, I’m telling you something about the kingdom, and I don’t want you to start trying to import all of your ideas about kingdoms into what I’m saying. Cause, people are saying, oh, he’s talking about the kingdom. I know what kingdoms are like. I’ve experienced them. I’m living in a kingdom right now. I know what that’s like. It’s just like all the other kingdoms. But, Jesus says, no, it’s not like that. It’s something completely different. And, he does that in a couple of ways, which I want to get to. But, first of all, let’s just contrast the description of Jesus’ kingdom to the contrast of the kingdom of their day.

The immediate context for at least the people who would have been the original hearers here, is that just a couple decades before, the Hellenisation happened, with the Greeks conquering all of the middle east. Alexander the Great comes in, his kingdom comes into town, and everybody knew he was there, because he came in like a hammer. He came in and just disposed people of their land, got rid of all the kings, got rid of all the leaders, took all their treasure, right? There were only two kinds of people in Alexander the Great’s kingdom … people who fought against him and died, and the people who were in his kingdom, the people who were left over. That’s what the knew kingdoms were like. That’s the kingdom they knew, is that a kingdom comes in, and it just changes everything, it comes in like a hammer, it just destroys everything, and then we prop up some new leader, and it just starts all over again.

But, Jesus is saying something different here. He’s saying the nature of my kingdom is different than that. The nature of my kingdom is not like a boulder, it’s like a seed. And, a seed comes in softly, it comes in quietly. A boulder comes in and just tears through the ground and leaves a trench in its path, but a seed comes in, and it does its work slowly, oftentimes unseen for quite a while. The seed comes in organically, gradually, and gently, the boulder comes in suddenly and coercively. The boulder breaks the ground, but the seed transforms the ground, right? The boulder doesn’t do much of anything to change the environment, but if a seed is left to itself, pretty soon deserts become forests. See, boulders come in with just sheer power, but the seed comes in and transforms it, because God’s kingdom is like a seed. It transforms things in their nature, it doesn’t just come through and scratch the surface. 

See, I have a picture for you that I want to show you. On the surface, you would think that boulder’s pretty strong. And, if you were to compare a big boulder like that and a tiny little seed, you’d probably say the boulder wins every time. But, left to itself, and over time, with faithful watering, look what happens. See, Jesus’ kingdom is like this. It doesn’t come in like Alexander the Great. It doesn’t come in and just dispose of everyone else. It comes in, and it radically transforms and breaks things down, that on the surface you would think could never be broken. Seeds, roots, shoots, trees, forests, fruit, seeds, roots, shoots, trees, forests … this is how God’s kingdom works, and that should be lifegiving to us. 

It should be lifegiving to us, because we don’t have to do all of God’s work all at once. See, that’s why you can’t go to sleep at night, because you think, I’ve got to get it all done right now. But, that’s not how God’s kingdom works. See, the other thing here that’s important to see, is that when he talks about the seed growing up into a large tree where the birds of the air come and make nests in his branches, something that the totality of all the gospels are getting at here, is that, again, there’s background, right? There’s the Old Testament background to this, and we can’t go through it all right here, but I’d encourage you to read Ezekiel 17, Ezekiel 30, Isaiah 60, go read it on your own, and even the previous parable is alluding to this, right? What happens in the parable? Where are the birds? They come in and they take the seed, and they fly away so that nothing can grow. 

But, see, now in this parable, the very same creatures, the birds that just took the seed, now have a place to rest because of the seed. The very birds that just stole the seed, are now benefiting from the seed. See, this is God’s upside down kingdom. In the background of Ezekiel and Isaiah, they talk about the nations being the birds of the air, that the nations would come and rest in the kingdom of God. They use this vivid imagery of all of the birds of the air migrating to God’s great kingdom, which is described as a tree, and some of that was in our liturgy this morning. They come and they find rest, come and find shalom, they come and find sabbath in God’s kingdom. And, this is the upside down nature of the kingdom, the very creatures that just one moment ago were stealing the seed, are now benefiting from the seed, making nests in the branches.

And, it’s this upside down kingdom that forces us to realize something, here, when read Jesus’ parable sand we hear them today, is that there is a necessity for us to let Jesus explain his kingdom. Because, we, just like the original hearers, we hear kingdom language and we import all of our cultural ideas about what kingdom is, so we have to stop and say, no, I’m going to let Jesus define and explain his kingdom, because everything that Jesus is describing here is upside down and backwards from the way that I understand, and the way that I would do it. I would come in hard and strong, I would come in and dig a hole, and bring in those boulders. But Jesus says, no, it comes in like a seed. You don’t understand. And, I’m going to come in with my anxiety, and I’m going to work my tail off at the end of the day, and I’m going to stay up all night worrying about it. No, it comes in differently than that. You can rest. You can sleep. 

So, there’s a necessity that we need to let Jesus define his kingdom, and we know that that’s necessary, because look at the response of the disciples. Why is he even teaching in parables over and over and over again in the first place? He’s doing it because his listeners don’t get it. He has to teach them, because it’s not like anything they’ve ever known. But, here’s my question … why didn’t Jesus just put the kingdom of God into a sentence or do some kind of venn diagram of flow chart or something? Why didn’t he just give us the numbers? Can’t you just give it to me in a sentence, Jesus? Why all the stories? 

See, what I think here, and what I want you to hear, my friends, is that Jesus is describing a real thing. The kingdom of God is not just an idea. It’s a real kingdom. And, if it’s a real thing, if it’s a real kingdom, then just simple propositions and assertions is not enough to capture the reality of that thing. We know this is true, because we do this all the time. If I was to ask you right now, if you’re married, describe your marriage. Describe to me that real thing you have. What would you do? Would you pull out your calendar and show me your schedule? There’s my marriage, on paper. Would you pull out your budget and show me all your bills? Would you show me your ring? What would you do to describe your marriage? Well, poets have been doing that for a long time, right? When people try to describe real things, what do they do? They describe it with analogies, they describe it with parables, they describe it with metaphors. Because it’s real, you can’t encapsulate it with just assertions. You have to describe it deeper than that, right? 

Do you guys know who Andrew Peterson, the musician, is? We listen to him a lot in our car, as we drive. He has a song called Dancing in the Mine Fields. Have you heard that song? That’s how he describes his marriage. It’s a good picture, right? He says, my marriage is like dancing in the mine fields, sailing in the storm. That’s what he calls it. When you go to describe something like marriage, you go to describe something that’s real, and tangible, and beautiful, you’re a force to try to use analogies and metaphors and parables to describe it, and that’s why Jesus is using these parables, because he’s saying it’s real, it’s here, and in order to experience it, you need to understand it, but in order to understand it, you have to dive deep. I can’t just list it out in a sentence or show you a chart.

See, C.S. Lewis said it this way … 

People...suppose that allegory is a disguise, a way of saying obscurely what could have been said more clearly. But in fact, all good allegory exists not to hide but to reveal; to make the inner world more palpable by giving it an (imagined) concrete embodiment.

—C.S. Lewis, The Pilgrim’s Regress

See, C.S. Lewis is getting at something that we all intuitively know, which is that if we’re trying to describe something real, we have to rely on metaphor and analogy. But, see, what we often will do is this, though. We’ll take those analogies, we’ll take those metaphors of Jesus, no less, and try to insert our preconceived notions to fit what we think God’s kingdom should be like. But, if Jesus is actually talking about a kingdom, friends, the question is, is he the king? Who’s the king of the kingdom? And, if you come to Jesus’ kingdom, if you come to God’s kingdom, and you think … I’m going to insert my expectations, I’m going to insert my understanding, I’m going to insert my desires into God’s kingdom, then who’s the king? You are, or at least you’re trying to be. See, Jesus taught in a way that turned everything upside down. And, we know we’re in good company, friends, because Jesus’ closest disciples did the same thing, which is why he had to say it over and over again. 

Later on in Mark, just a couple of chapters ahead, Mark 10:42, they’re all fighting about what the kingdom’s going to be like, and who’s going to be in charge, and Mark says in chapter 10 … Jesus calls to them and said to them, “You know that those who are considered rules of the Gentiles lorded over them, and their great ones exercise authority over them, but it shall not be so among you, for whoever will be great among you must be your servant, and whoever would be first among you must be your slave. For, even the Son of Man came not to be served, but to serve, and to give his life for ransom for many.” 

See, Jesus’ own disciples didn’t understand the kingdom. They’re all still fighting, who’s going to be in charge, and Jesus says … you know what my kingdom’s like? My kingdom is the God of the universe, the God who made everything, maybe to put it another way … the largest and most powerful being became the smallest, like a seed, and came into the world, and was buried, so that something could grow. He didn’t come in swinging, he didn’t come in like a boulder, he didn’t come in like Alexander the Great, he came in like a seed.

Now, if you’re like me, I want Jesus to be my king. How do I do that? Jesus, help me. I want you to be my king, but I recognize in my life, over and over again, I still am fighting you because I want to be king, too. Well, there’s another place where a mustard seed is used to explain something about God’s kingdom. In Matthew 17, Jesus uses the mustard seed again, and he says this … that it’s the size of your faith, if you had faith the size of a mustard seed, you could tell the mountain to move here, and it would move, and nothing would be impossible. See, the disciples had gone out, and they were trying to basically usher in God’s kingdom, they were going out, Jesus sent them out and said, I want you to preach the gospel, I want you to heal people, I want you to exorcise demons, and then they encountered this situation they couldn’t fix. They encountered a demon they couldn’t exercise, and they fail, and they come back to Jesus, and they say, why couldn’t we do this? And he says, it’s because you didn’t have faith. And they’re like, well, I want faith. How much faith do I have to have? Jesus says, you have to have the faith of a mustard seed. What does that mean?

See, if you’re like me, we’re constantly fighting Jesus’ kingship in our lives. But, the good news is that all you need is mustard sized faith. What does that mean? It means that it’s not the size of your faith, it’s the object of your faith that matters. See, I’m indebted to Timothy Keller who uses this analogy, he says, a strong faith in a weak object will kill you, but a weak faith in a strong object will save your life, right? If you’re falling off a cliff and you reach out for a strong root to hold you up, all you need is a little faith for that root to hold you, cause it’s the object that matters, it’s not the amount of faith I’m putting in it, right? But, I can have a lot of faith and reach out and grab a weak object, and what happens? I fall. 

See, when we’re faced with God’s kingdom, when we’re faced with the light of the kingdom coming into the world, we’re faced with the reality that, by ourselves, we cannot receive the light, by ourselves we cannot be the light, and by ourselves we can grow God’s kingdom. So, what are we left with? We’re left with faith the size of a mustard seed. 

And, that’s why every week when we gather as a church, we gather around Jesus’ table. That’s why we do that, because it’s a demonstration of us coming to the table with a mustard sized faith of saying, my only hope is to receive from Jesus what he needs to give me. I’m not coming to it bringing my own meal - I hope you didn’t pack your lunch and try to bring it with you for communion. We come and we receive Jesus’ meal. We come to Jesus’ kingdom, and we have to stop and say, will I let Jesus actually be the king? Will I let him define what the kingdom is? See, that’s what communion is, is that we come, and we say, the one who made the universe came and condescended, and became small like a seed for us, for our good. 

Let’s read this one last passage as we prepare for communion. John 12:24-26 …

Truly, truly, I say to you, unless a grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies, it remains alone; but if it dies, it bears much fruit. Whoever loves his life loses it, and whoever hates his life in this world will keep it for eternal life. If anyone serves me, he must follow me; and where I am, there will my servant be also. If anyone serves me, the Father will honor him … 

Let’s pray. Father, as we prepare to come to your table, will you help us today to see, maybe for the first time - and I’m sure for many of us in here - to see for the thousandth time - that our only hope is that you would be the king, that our only hope is that we would rest and trust that you came like a seed to be buried in the earth to die, so that a mighty tree might grow, and that mighty nations might fall, and that your people would come and find rest in you. God, would you help us to see the kingdom the way your son sees it, and would you help us to live as if you are actually in charge. So, as we come to the table, would you help us, God. In Jesus’ name, amen. 


Parables of the Kingdom-Full Sermon Transcript

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PASTOR: MAX STERNJACOB

SCRIPTURE READING

“Again he began to teach beside the sea. And a very large crowd gathered about him, so that he got into a boat and sat in it on the sea, and the whole crowd was beside the sea on the land. And he was teaching them many things in parables, and in his teaching he said to them: “Listen! Behold, a sower went out to sow. And as he sowed, some seed fell along the path, and the birds came and devoured it. Other seed fell on rocky ground, where it did not have much soil, and immediately it sprang up, since it had no depth of soil. And when the sun rose, it was scorched, and since it had no root, it withered away. Other seed fell among thorns, and the thorns grew up and choked it, and it yielded no grain. And other seeds fell into good soil and produced grain, growing up and increasing and yielding thirtyfold and sixtyfold and a hundredfold.” And he said, “He who has ears to hear, let him hear.” And when he was alone, those around him with the twelve asked him about the parables. And he said to them, “To you has been given the secret of the kingdom of God, but for those outside everything is in parables, so that “‘they may indeed see but not perceive, and may indeed hear but not understand, lest they should turn and be forgiven.’” And he said to them, “Do you not understand this parable? How then will you understand all the parables? The sower sows the word. And these are the ones along the path, where the word is sown: when they hear, Satan immediately comes and takes away the word that is sown in them. And these are the ones sown on rocky ground: the ones who, when they hear the word, immediately receive it with joy. And they have no root in themselves, but endure for a while; then, when tribulation or persecution arises on account of the word, immediately they fall away. And others are the ones sown among thorns. They are those who hear the word, but the cares of the world and the deceitfulness of riches and the desires for other things enter in and choke the word, and it proves unfruitful. But those that were sown on the good soil are the ones who hear the word and accept it and bear fruit, thirtyfold and sixtyfold and a hundredfold.””

—Mark 4:1–20 ES

INTRO

Good morning, Emmaus. My name’s Max, I’m one of the pastors here. I’m the pastor for discipleship and care, and I’m also the newest full time staff person here, and that means that I get, sometimes, in the position of kind of wondering, how did I end up here? Because, I have had many jobs in my life. This is, by far, my favorite one, so you can be rest assured I ain’t going anywhere for awhile. But, when we come to this passage, I’m in a unique position here, because you’ve probably heard this passage before, right? It’s one of the most common passages that the world even quotes. The world, who maybe want nothing to do with Jesus, they like what he teaches, and they will use the parables to Jesus to their own ends. And so, even if you’re not a Christian this morning, you’re probably familiar with this parable. 

But, the reason why this is unique is not just because it’s famous, but it’s also unique because it’s one of the only places where Jesus actually explains the parable. And, that makes my job hard. It makes it hard, because I don’t want to be the fool who gets up here and tries to make my word equal with Jesus’ word, and it also makes it hard because I don’t want to go beyond what Jesus has said here. So, my job this morning, I hope you’ll bear with me, and my job this morning is to hopefully take and make the most of what Jesus has said here, without going beyond it. My hope this morning is to pastorally help you to take this story that is probably very familiar to you, and helps us to apply it as a church, maybe see it fresh again. Because, usually as it is with things we’re familiar with, we tend to go yeah, yeah, I know the point, and so we don’t stop and think about it. So, with that in mind, we need God’s help, yes? I certainly do. Let’s pray and ask for his help this morning. 

Father,

I pray this morning that our familiarity with this story and this parable and your teaching would not cause us to not hear. There is a warning here that we can use our ears, but we can walk out of here not understanding. And, God, I know for myself that there are many things that I have experienced in my life that want to twist, to try to insert into this passage to make myself feel good about myself, or feel better about my past. But, God, would you this morning allow us to actually hear you, not me, not ourselves, but you. And, God, would you this morning do the very thing this parable is talking about. Would you take your word and scatter it among us, that it might bear fruit. By your Spirit, in Jesus’ good name, amen. 

If you were with us three weeks ago, our clerk of the clasis, our denomination, was actually here preaching, and he said something in passing that I thought was very insightful. He said that Mark is like the action movie gospel. It’s like scene after scene after scene of quick action, and Jesus is going from thing to thing, from teaching to teaching, from place to place, and it moves fast. But, just like an action movie, the scenes that come before it, influence the scene in the present, and what we have come from is this rising tension that has happened, here. And, there are three things that I want to take some time to look at when it comes to this parable, cause this is the first time, at least in the gospel of Mark, that parables are used by Jesus. The first one is that there’s a disturbance that this parable causes, we want to look at the details - the facts and figures - of the parable, and we want to look at the depth of the parable, the deep meaning and the application.

First, some context, cause context is king when we are trying to interpret. That rising tension I just mentioned is really surrounding not around the people, per se, but around the religious leaders. The religious leaders have their eyes on Jesus, and they don’t like what he is about. They don’t like what he’s saying, they don’t like what he’s doing. Jesus is going around healing people, freeing people from demonic oppression, forgiving people. But, the ministers of the day, the pastors of their day, the religious leaders, were not too keen on the subversion of their authority by Jesus. They didn’t like their influence being attacked. Because, the people in Mark talked about … we’ve never heard anybody teach like this. We’ve never heard anybody with this kind of authority. And, that cut right to the heart of the religious leaders, saying, well, wait a minute … I’ve been teaching for years, and no one's ever complimented me about my teaching. They’ve never talked about how I have authority, but yet this man from Galilee, this no name from Galilee, the people are following him, so much so that Mark says here that the crowds were so large that Jesus had to get on a boat and get away from land so that everyone could see and hear him when he spoke. 

See, this conflict was not just with the religious leaders, though, but with his own family. If you remember in prior weeks, we talked about that Jesus’ own family thought he was crazy, and they came just prior to this section of Jesus talking in parables here, they came to arrest him, to take him back into custody and say, we’ve got to take this guy home. So, this context we find ourselves in Mark, it’s been action scene after action scene after action scene, yet now we slow down, and Jesus starts telling stories, and Mark takes the time to say, not only am I going to tell you this story, but I’m going to tell you what Jesus said in explaining the story. And, what is going to happen here, is that Mark in his gospel is trying to slow down and tell us something important. He’s trying to show us, how is it that smart, learned, religious people who ought to know and expect a messiah, and how Jesus’ own family who have known him his whole life and have watched him grow and act, can reject him when he’s right in front of them?

Jesus tells this parable about the reality of rejection. How can this be true? How can people, in spite of the evidence that’s right in front of them, in spite of Jesus’ character, in spite of his miracles, in spite of his teaching and authority, in spite of everything he’s demonstrated, how can they reject him outright? See, when I first started interning, I started interning at a church out in Banning when I was 16 years old, and I wanted to pursue working in full time ministry at 16. Had I known then what I know how, I probably would have said … I should find a better job, easier job. But, see, one of the first things that was told to me - advice, if you will - as I started interning at church and working with, like, junior highers and high school students, was, when you’re going to talk or preach, you want to make it easy for people to understand you. You want to share lots of stories, so that people can follow. You want to be relevant. But, if you read with us this morning already, Jesus doesn’t do that. In fact, Jesus makes it harder to understand. 

Why does he do that? This passage seems to fly in the face of all the advice that I got as a young man. So, who’s right? My counselors, or Jesus? Jesus. Good. Someone’s listening, yes. This parable, I would suggest to you, is a parable about parables. Jesus uses this parable to talk about why he speaks in parables. And, the background here - if you notice in your Bibles, verse 12 of chapter 4, Jesus quotes something to them, from Isaiah 6 … 

Go, and say to this people: “Keep on hearing, but do not understand; keep on seeing, but do not perceive.” Make the heart of this people dull, and their ears heavy, and blind their eyes; lest they see with their eyes, and hear with their ears, and understand with their hearts, and turn and be healed.

—Isaiah 6:9-10 ESV


And, in Mark 4, verse 10, right before he quote that passage from Isaiah, it says … And when he was alone, those around him with the twelve asked him about the parables. And he said to them, “To you has been given the secret of the kingdom of God, but for those outside everything is in parables, so that “‘they may indeed see but not perceive, and may indeed hear but not understand” … 

See, this parable is a parable about parables. In fact, later on in the next passage that we’re going to get into next week, Mark 4:34, it says that … from this point on, Jesus did not publicly teach without a parable … so, there is something that is happening in this parable that’s significant, and I think the key to unlocking what Jesus is talking about in his words here is starting at us right here. It’s from Isaiah, and if you go back to the beginning of Mark, what’s the first thing that happens in chapter 1? You can look there, it says … The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the son of God, as it is written in Isaiah the prophet, “I send my messenger before you, prepare the way, the voice of the one crying in the wilderness, prepare the way of the Lord, make his paths straight …” See, Mark explicitly, and in Matthew and Luke, implicitly, they are saying something about Jesus. They are saying that Jesus is fulfilling Isaiah’s words. And, if we go back to Isaiah and his commissioning by God, God tells Isaiah … go to your people, and they will hear but not understand, they will see and not perceive. Make the heart of this people dull, make their ears heavy and blind their eyes lest they see with their eyes and hear with their ears, and understand with their hearts, and turn and be healed … That’s Isaiah 6. 

See, while all the gospels rendered this command as slightly different ways, it all captures the basic essence of Jesus’ words here in Isaiah’s prophecy. Isaiah sees a vision of the Lord and is charged to go preach to the nation. He spent his life proclaiming the impending judgement and the coming messiah, and the restoration of the remnant. But, God tells them right at the beginning of his ministry, that you’re preaching is not going to be received. In fact, the opposite result is going to take place. More people are going to be unresponsive. See, when Isaiah entered into his ministry, God told him that what you preach is going to stir faith in some, but most are going to be hardened. And, the Lord tells Isaiah in his ministry that is by design. In God’s mysterious plan, he is causing division between the repentant and the unrepentant. And, when Jesus comes onto the scene, especially in the gospel of Mark, Mark is saying that Jesus is taking up the same kind of ministry as Isaiah, it’s going to have the same result. 

So, what is Jesus doing in this parable? First, he’s identifying himself as a prophet, because he’s using Isaiah to talk about his ministry. But, what he is saying is that the culmination of Isaiah is being brought forth, it’s being brought in. The kingdom of God that was talked about in the Old Testament is now in their midst. And, when he does that, when he starts speaking the way he does with authority, and now speaking with parables, it causes hardness of heart, it causes a disturbance. So, let’s dig in here to the disturbance of this parable, yes?

I. THE DISTURBANCE OF THE PARABLE (Mark 4:10-13)

We know the context. What’s causing the disturbance? It’s in Mark 4:10-13, let’s just read it again … 

… And when he was alone, those around him with the twelve asked him about the parables. And he said to them, “To you has been given the secret of the kingdom of God, but for those outside everything is in parables, so that “‘they may indeed see but not perceive, and may indeed hear but not understand, lest they should turn and be forgiven.’” And he said to them, “Do you not understand this parable? How then will you understand all the parables? …

See, Jesus is trying to weed out true and false disciples here. Now, here’s the question … Jesus often includes elements in his parables and teaching that were shocking. And, by shocking I mean that he speaks in a way that goes against the normal conventions of the day, the way people would expect things to work. Just off the top of my head, you know, the parable of the prodigal son, the reaction of the father and the actions of the son, it flies in the face of the cultural conventions of the day. Noone would go to their father and ask for their inheritance early. And, no father would run out and be quick to forgive someone who did that. The good Samaritan, right? The Samaritan is the one who has mercy, the people who are enemies of Israel, and the Levite and the priest who we would think of as pastors of their day, ignore the needs of the man who’d been robbed. The two debtors, the one who owed much and the one who owed little, and the weeds where Jesus tells the parable of the weeds that are amongst the wheat and the farmer tells his workers, don’t pull out the weeds, just let them grow. All of these things, when Jesus talks in parables - and this parable especially - every single time Jesus talks in parables, there’s always something in the parable that is shocking, that people go, that just doesn't make sense. That doesn’t sound right. That sounds like it’s the wrong thing to do. 

So, what is it in this parable that is shocking? What is it that flies in the face of our conventions, or at least the conventions of that day? What is it? Is there something miraculous going on here? I would submit to you that there is, and it’s the harvest. The fruitful yield, here, is the shocking result. See, the agricultural return here - now, how many of you guys are farmers? Do you count tomatoes as farming? Most of us don’t make our living by farming, and most of us get our food not from our backyard, but we go to the grocery store. So, we’re many years removed from this kind of lifestyle, and we’re many layers removed from this kind of living. And so, we forget how growing things work.

See, I think as modern western readers, we forget the shocking results that are talked about here from the sower and the seed. I have a picture here I just want to remind you of. This is wheat, you may not have seen it not in a loaf of bread, but this is where it comes from. And, I was doing some research on wheat and grains, and I don’t know if you can kind of see, he’s kind of holding two bunches here, but most of the time on a head of wheat like that, you would have 15 to 20 grains of wheat, little seeds. And, that means that when you go out to sow seed, one seed produced one grass, and one grass would produce 15-20 heads like that. Now, I couldn’t find records, but I did find this as I was researching, that in the middle ages, in the year 1250, in Britain, there were some parchment documents that talk about the yield and return on wheat and barley. And, what I found was that in the year 1250, farmers, on average, would get a 17 to 1 return. So, that means if they gathered their harvest and they would set aside some of the seed for the next sowing, they would get 17 back for each 1 bushel of barley, and that was considered good. 

Now, in the ancient near east, you would think that in 1250 years, farming technology had gotten better, and the return was probably a lot less, right? I mean, you have things like locust and mice and people walking by and just … I mean, Jesus just previous walked by and took some of the grains with his disciples, right? We just saw that. So, the return would be somewhere, let’s just say 12-15 to 1. So, when Jesus tells this parable, and he gets to the end of the parable and he says, the seed that fell on the good soil produced a return of 30, 60, and 100 … the original hearers would probably be saying … yeah, right. That is unbelievable. That never happens. See, and we know that Jesus is purposefully saying something shocking cause he’s trying to elicit a response from his readers. And, I think we’re on good ground to think that that is a major point that Jesus is trying to make, because the next parable after this that we’re going to be talking about next week in Mark 4:26, if you want to look at it, it says … the kingdom of God is if a man would scatter seed on the ground. He goes to bed and sleeps and rises night and day and the seed sprouts and grows, and he knows not how … See, in the next parable Jesus is going to highlight something to us about the reality of the fruitfulness of the harvest, and the farmer doesn’t know what causes it. 

See, in that day, everyone believed it was either God or the gods that were in charge of the harvest, right? They knew that. They assumed that there was something miraculous at play. They don’t know how things grow. So, for Jesus to talk about this kind of harvest was something significant, and he’s pointing to God’s providence, here, and he’s pointing to the fact that God is doing something miraculous. In 1 Corinthians 3:3-9, Paul later on reflecting on Jesus’ teaching, says this … 

“for you are still of the flesh. For while there is jealousy and strife among you, are you not of the flesh and behaving only in a human way? For when one says, “I follow Paul,” and another, “I follow Apollos,” are you not being merely human? What then is Apollos? What is Paul? Servants through whom you believed, as the Lord assigned to each. I planted, Apollos watered, but God gave the growth. So neither he who plants nor he who waters is anything, but only God who gives the growth. He who plants and he who waters are one, and each will receive his wages according to his labor. For we are God’s fellow workers. You are God’s field, God’s building.”

—1 Corinthians 3:3–9 ESV

See, Jesus talked about the sowers and the seed and the soils, and Paul, reflecting on this later, uses that same kind of analogy and conflict of the church to say, don’t you recognize that you are God’s field? You are being grown, not by me, not by Paul, but by God. See, for Jesus’ audience, nothing is out of the ordinary of what he said here, until he gets to the end. And, Jesus, who’s making things harder to understand, and who is clearly talking about a miraculous return in yield on the fruit, that at this point, the people listening to Jesus would say, Jesus, you need to stick to your day job. You need to go back to being a carpenter, cause you clearly don’t know how to teach, and you clearly don’t understand how farming works. But, see, Jesus is trying to teach something, and he’s doing a really good job of it, and he’s teaching us about the nature of the kingdom. And, he’s doing it in a way that forces people either to stick around and be near to him, or doing it in such a way that they can write him off and ignore him, or maybe even worse, kill him. 

The parables of Jesus are dynamic stories that should draw us in to reflect. Jesus does not confine his teaching to just systematic propositions. He implicates the listener into the dynamic motion of the story, and just as Nathan in the Old Testament, arouses the moral imagination of David in calling out his adultery with Bathsheba, Jesus arouses the spiritual imagination of his hearers, that they might understand the nature of the kingdom. And, by choosing to speak to the multitudes in parables, Jesus reveals a deeper truth that we all really know about the teaching process, that if the content is made too easily accessible, we won’t actually learn it, because we were never forced to think deeply on it. Have you experienced that?

See, this is why in the age of Wikipedia and Google, and more access to information than we’ve ever had, are we smarter because of that? Are we wiser because of that? We live in an age where we can quickly and easily get access to any information and knowledge. But, why is it we’re not smarter or wiser? Why is it that we’re not more educated? Why are we not more adept at living? Why is it that we’re the dumbest age, right? Have you ever seen those man on the street things where people go out and they ask simple questions of, like, what’s the capital of the United States? And, people are like, I don’t know … Copenhagen, right? We have more access to information, yet we’re dumber than we’ve ever been. See, people don’t remember things if they know they can just go look it up. 

And, the parables of Jesus also remind us that learning does not always have an immediate result. That, acquiring knowledge, sometimes, is very slow. We build upon line upon line, precept upon precept. In fact, this is exactly what being a disciple is, right? Being a disciple is being a learner. And, sometimes the slow, cumbersome, and tedious work that learning is, is actually producing in us a greater return, because through difficulty, we grow. Because, the only thing that will sustain us when things are difficult, is the pure pleasure of the learning, itself, right? See, Jesus knows that it’s okay sometimes to leave someone behind, because he knows it’s not the end of the story.

Wisdom also involves keeping the long view in mind. Beauty takes time, fruitfulness takes time, eventually we know, if we read ahead in Mark, that the disciples did eventually get the aspects of the kingdom that Jesus wanted them to know. But, their knowledge was not immediately demonstrable, was it? We’re going to see here, in the future, that Jesus teaches things. In fact, we’re seeing that God actually divinely gives revelation to some of the disciples about who Jesus is, and in the next moment, they can’t take that knowledge and put it into practice when Jesus tells them, I’m going to die. So, there’s good news for us, yes? If you’re not learned, mature, wise yet, there’s time. As disciples, we make room for this long process that Jesus is about. 

See, I don’t know about you, but I have often gone back and thought about my parents, and teachers in my life who were trying to teach me something in the moment, and I missed it. And, it’s only years later, decades later, that I think back and I look, and I go … I see what they were trying to teach me. I get it, now. Thank you. Right? See, we should see a danger, here, which we’re going to get here in the details. We should see a danger, here, of getting it too quickly. Cause Jesus, in this parable, talks about growth that’s quick, and fast, but eventually dies out. So, let’s dig in to the details here.

II. THE DETAILS OF THE PARABLE (Mark 4:3-9,14-20)

We see that there’s a disturbance, and why does Jesus talk in parables? To cause this kind of disturbance in us, that we should want to stick around, to ask more questions. But, what are the details, here, of this parable? Look at Mark 4:3-9, and 14-20 … 

… Behold, a sower went out to sow. And as he sowed, some seed fell along the path, and the birds came and devoured it. Other seed fell on rocky ground, where it did not have much soil, and immediately it sprang up, since it had no depth of soil. And when the sun rose, it was scorched, and since it had no root, it withered away. Other seed fell among thorns, and the thorns grew up and choked it, and it yielded no grain. And other seeds fell into good soil and produced grain, growing up and increasing and yielding thirtyfold and sixtyfold and a hundredfold.” And he said, “He who has ears to hear, let him hear.” …

See, it’s important as we dive into the details of this parable, to try to make the most of what’s here, but not go beyond it. The first thing that popped into my head is what’s not here. Jesus does explain some things about the soil, but what does he not spend time explaining? Where does he not spend his time? He does not spend his time talking about the sower, his character, his heritage, how many years he’s been doing it, who his father was, where he got his land from. He doesn’t spend time talking about the technique, his casting method, his equipment. He doesn’t talk about the time of year, or the weather. He doesn’t talk about how the soil got that way. He just jumps in to talk about the soils. And, I think it’s wise for us to stop and say, how much of our time is spent talking about those things as a church? Our technique, the time of year, the weather, the equipment. He doesn’t spend any time talking about that, he talks about the soil. 

So, what do we see here in the soil? Let’s talk about it. The hard soil, right? Mark 4:14, what does it say in the explanation?

“The sower sows the word. And these are the ones along the path, where the word is sown: when they hear, Satan immediately comes and takes away the word that is sown in them.”

—Mark 4:14–15 ESV

It’s the path. It’s the hard soil. And, the idea, here, is that the seed - before it could even go into the soil, it’s on the hard path, and it’s stolen away. And, Jesus actually says it’s stolen away by Satan. And, as I thought about this, I would ask you to reflect with me the reality here that, I don’t know about you, but I have a strong conviction of protection of defending my stuff, and my family against threats that come and would threaten to take that away. But, do I have the same conviction and eagerness and passion when I know that God is sowing seed and that the enemy is taking that away, do I have the same zeal to prevent that from happening as I do with my own stuff? See, if the sower is sowing the word, is sowing the gospel in the lives of people, and there are things that are actively keeping that gospel from penetrating deep into the lives of people, there are things that are obstructing that, do I fight against those things just as much as I fight against the things that are my own? 

See, for us as a church, we have unity with one another, friends. We are all called to defend one another, to preach the gospel to one another, and to remove those obstructions from one another. Do we do that with the same zeal that we would do for our own family, as for others, for our own stuff, as for others? 


The rocky ground, Mark 4:16 …

“And these are the ones sown on rocky ground: the ones who, when they hear the word, immediately receive it with joy. And they have no root in themselves, but endure for a while; then, when tribulation or persecution arises on account of the word, immediately they fall away.”

—Mark 4:16–17 ESV


See, the rocky ground here, the idea is that there’s no root. It springs up, but the roots can’t go deep. It’s shallow. And, Jesus says here in the explanation of the details, that it’s the hardship, it’s the tribulation and persecution not on account of where they’re planted, but on account of the word. So, when they receive it with joy, we would expect that. There should be joy. But, when hardship comes, it leads to apathy and hostility, and they shrivel. See, we all can point to probably ourselves and other people that we know have grown chronologically, but they have not grown spiritually, right? They have no depth. Time ticks on, and we see growth, we see some green poking through, but eventually it fades, yes?

And then, Jesus talks about the thorny ground … 

“And others are the ones sown among thorns. They are those who hear the word, but the cares of the world and the deceitfulness of riches and the desires for other things enter in and choke the word, and it proves unfruitful.”

—Mark 4:18–19 ESV

See, everything else around them in this one has roots already, right? He says it’s thrown among the thorns, and the reason why it can’t go anywhere is because all these other things already have deep roots, so there’s nowhere for it to go. It does try, it grows up, but eventually it’s choked out. And, it’s interesting, isn’t it, that Jesus - what does he say is the cause here? - the cares of the world, and the deceitfulness of riches. Woah, Jesus, don’t talk about money. Right? Of all the things that Jesus could point to as why things get choked out, why does he go to money? He says it’s not just money, the deceitfulness of money. It’s the way money lies to you. How does money lie to you? See, money and wealth, more than anything else, can actually functionally prolong your life. It can protect you. It can help you have control. Wealth, more than anything, can effectively replace our need for God, right? See, if you have money, you can actually have access to better health care, and better food, and better medicine. And, you can have a bigger, more safe house, and safer vehicle to drive, right? You can actually extend your life with money, to some extent, right? You know, more people die in the world from just lack of access to fresh water than anything else. So, with money, you can have that. You can have clean water. But, Jesus says it’s deceitful, the riches. Right? Because, we’re deceived about money. Because money actually can do those things, we think that’s enough. 

See, money actually produces two things in us. It can produce significance, and it can produce safety and security. And, people who get significance from their money, spend a lot of money, right? Because, they want to feel important. And, people who get their security from money actually don’t spend any money. They save it, because it’s their security. And, both of those are lies. Both of those are deceitful. You cannot extend your life with money. You cannot have true life with money, and you cannot be safe because of money. They are the ones who get choked out, because money has a deeper root than God. 

Lastly, Jesus gets to the good soil … 

“But those that were sown on the good soil are the ones who hear the word and accept it and bear fruit, thirtyfold and sixtyfold and a hundredfold.”

—Mark 4:20 ESV

See, the good soil that the seed goes in, and it goes in deep, and roots can go deep, and that’s why there’s fruit. Let me ask you this … how many of the seeds grew? Three of them. Three of them actually grew, 75% of them. Want to know something else? 75% of them didn’t have fruit. So, those 75% of them actually grew, only 25% actually bore fruit, and this is the point of the parable, right? We should really read that last sentence before we read the rest of the parable, cause it informs everything else. That 25% of the seed produces a return of 100 fold? Are you kidding? See, if you’re hearing this, and like the listeners that first heard this, you’re immediate thought should be … that’s miraculous. That’s a miracle. How could that few of seed produce that kind of return? Only God could produce that kind of return. 

See, Jesus says here, by what he emphasizes, that it is not about our technique, or trying to change ourselves or the ground. He stops and says, it’s God’s providence that’s on display, here. So, this turns, now, to the depth of this parable, the meaning behind it, the application for us, the depth of the parable.

III. THE DEPTH OF THE PARABLE (Mark 4:14-20)

It’s the depth that is the determining factor. It’s the thing that unifies all of that. The reason why things grow up and die, or go nowhere at all, or actually produce fruit, is because of the depth. And, when we read the beginning of this parable, it says something that you probably would not know unless you’re reading from the Greek, but in verse 3 of chapter 4, it says, before he starts teaching this parable … listen, listen. It’s the world shama from the Old Testament. Do you know the shama? It’s … hear, oh Israel, listen, oh Israel, the Lord our God, the Lord is one … He’s using the same language from the Old Testament about hearing, and not just hearing. Because, again, the idea of listening or hearing, that shama word, is know, understand, live as if it is true, that God is our Lord, and he is one. 

And, Jesus uses that same language, here, to say, listen and hear this parable. Live as if it were true. All other activities of the church are subservient to the proclamation of the gospel, is it not? Everything we do should be to plant the gospel. This is why if, indeed, everything is subservient to preaching and planting the gospel, why we can celebrate things like Bible Camp. If you were with is for the week, you know. And, if you got to pop in, you know that on the surface it looks silly, what we’re doing, right? We’re playing games and reading stories with kids. Is that really going to go somewhere? Is that really going to produce fruit? Well, in God’s economy, yes. It will. This is why we can be celebratory of what was going on in San Bernardino. It was not a waste. Because, we see that we risk, we go and our job is to plant. Our job is not to determine the outcome. This is why we can be okay with paying for an empty building for a while. Right? Are we wasting money?

See, everything becomes subservient to planting and preaching the gospel. And so, from the outside, it can look silly, it can look wasteful, it can look risky, it can actually look like there’s nothing happening, but we plant on. Because, depth is the most important thing, let’s think about this. Let’s put our farmer hat on for a minute. What grows first? The roots. Do you see that? Do you see roots? You don’t see them. Roots grow first. What is unseen comes before what is seen. And, I would say to you, maybe you are here for the first time, that actually it is a miraculous work of God that you are just sitting here this morning. And, that’s all that we see. It is small, it is unassuming, but it’s something that God is doing, because we know that seeds produce roots, and roots produce shoots, and shoots produce trees, and trees produce forests. And, something small can have a return of 100 fold, because it is God who produces the growth.

Patience, slowness, steadiness, organic growth is slow growth, but it is also the healthiest and the most fruitful. Do we really believe, like Isaiah 55 tells us, and as this parable is teaching us, that all we have to do is scatter it? Do you believe that? See, for others of you, there’s a warning here. There's encouragement, right, that roots grow first. So, sometimes we don’t see growth, but God is at work. But, there’s also a warning here, that some of you might have been growing for a long time. There’s a lot of green, but there’s no fruit. 

See, the theology behind this parable is that the Lord’s sovereignty in salvation is puzzling, but ultimately glorifying. The seed of the gospel is freely and lovingly scattered to any and everyone, and it is a soil that matters. God, alone, is the one who prepares the soil to receive the seed, and this is very freeing, is it not? It is freeing for me. It ought to be freeing to you, because you are not in charge of the yield. Jesus is still the king, even though his kingdom does not grow as fast as we expect, as large as we would expect, or when we expect, or where we expect. We do not need to worry about the percentages, or the numbers, we do not need to worry about waste or risk. We do not need to let our technique trump anything. We are just called to sow.

That should be freeing to you, because for some of you, you think your job is to get all the rocks and the weeds out of the field. You’re unhappy because you have forgotten that you are not the gardener in this story, you are the soil. You’re sitting there with thorns and rocks in your life, and you’re just saying … I need to get better at pulling these out. But, that’s not your job. Your job is to shama, your job is to hear, to live as it if it is true, that the gardener, the ultimate gardener, is the one who produces the growth. And, I am calling you - Jesus is calling you - to recognize that you are not strong enough for that job. That, you need the gardener in your life. You need to go to him and to say, I have rocks and boulders in my life, I have thorns in my life. I have the deceitfulness of riches in my life. I actually believe that I can extend my life and make it secure without you. 

Have you received the gospel? Has God prepared your heart to receive it? The harvest is miraculous because it is only God at work in the life of someone who can urge them to stick around and ask questions about Jesus, right? Jesus is looking for people who not just hear, but understand, not just see and perceive. And, in a moment, we who have received are going to come to the table to remind us that it is all about receiving. Our liturgy from Isaiah 55 reminds us that God has prepared a banquet for us that we can come eat and drink without cost, and without money, without price. That’s the definition of receiving, isn’t it? But, to him, it costs him everything to bring his gospel into our life, and the hard soil of our hearts. Listen to the end of Isaiah 55 with me … 

““For as the rain and the snow come down from heaven and do not return there but water the earth, making it bring forth and sprout, giving seed to the sower and bread to the eater, so shall my word be that goes out from my mouth; it shall not return to me empty, but it shall accomplish that which I purpose, and shall succeed in the thing for which I sent it. “For you shall go out in joy and be led forth in peace; the mountains and the hills before you shall break forth into singing, and all the trees of the field shall clap their hands. Instead of the thorn shall come up the cypress; instead of the brier shall come up the myrtle; and it shall make a name for the LORD, an everlasting sign that shall not be cut off.””

—Isaiah 55:10–13 ESV

See, friends, why am I getting emotional? I am guilty of putting my own metric on things. And, I am guilty of also assuming that just because I see some green, that I can ignore that. And, I am calling you, and Jesus is calling you, that if you do not have the fruitfulness of the gospel in your life, either because you’ve never received it, or because you’ve received it with joy but you have no depth, and no fruit, that you need to respond. You need to receive, without cost, without price. So, in a moment, we’re going to come to God’s table and we’re going to receive. And, if you have not done that, that table is not for you. But, if you need to receive, then I would encourage you to stick around, like his disciples did, and ask questions. I’m here, Pastor Matt is here, we would love to talk to you more about what that means to receive the gospel. Will you pray with me?

Father,

Help us, by your Spirit, to hear and understand ourselves, where we lack the gospel going deep into our lives and hearts. Would you help those who may never have received your Word and your gospel, to do so now, and would you help us, as a church, to have the long, fruitful view of your kingdom the way Jesus did. Would you help us not to assume that our technique, our stuff, and our experience, and our character is what you’re after, but you are after new hearts, and we can trust and rest in knowing that your Word will go out and be scattered, and it will not return empty, because you are good, and you are producing a miraculous harvest. Help us, God. In Jesus’ name, amen. 


Slaves Set Free-Full Sermon Transcript

Link to Blog

MARK 3:7-35 

DEACON OF BENEVOLENCE: RAYMOND MOREHOUSE 

SCRIPTURE READING

“Jesus withdrew with his disciples to the sea, and a great crowd followed, from Galilee and Judea and Jerusalem and Idumea and from beyond the Jordan and from around Tyre and Sidon. When the great crowd heard all that he was doing, they came to him. And he told his disciples to have a boat ready for him because of the crowd, lest they crush him, for he had healed many, so that all who had diseases pressed around him to touch him. And whenever the unclean spirits saw him, they fell down before him and cried out, “You are the Son of God.” And he strictly ordered them not to make him known.

And he went up on the mountain and called to him those whom he desired, and they came to him. And he appointed twelve (whom he also named apostles) so that they might be with him and he might send them out to preach and have authority to cast out demons. He appointed the twelve: Simon (to whom he gave the name Peter); James the son of Zebedee and John the brother of James (to whom he gave the name Boanerges, that is, Sons of Thunder); Andrew, and Philip, and Bartholomew, and Matthew, and Thomas, and James the son of Alphaeus, and Thaddaeus, and Simon the Zealot, and Judas Iscariot, who betrayed him.

Then he went home, and the crowd gathered again, so that they could not even eat. And when his family heard it, they went out to seize him, for they were saying, “He is out of his mind.”

And the scribes who came down from Jerusalem were saying, “He is possessed by Beelzebul,” and “by the prince of demons he casts out the demons.” And he called them to him and said to them in parables, “How can Satan cast out Satan? If a kingdom is divided against itself, that kingdom cannot stand. And if a house is divided against itself, that house will not be able to stand. And if Satan has risen up against himself and is divided, he cannot stand, but is coming to an end. But no one can enter a strong man's house and plunder his goods, unless he first binds the strong man. Then indeed he may plunder his house.

“Truly, I say to you, all sins will be forgiven the children of man, and whatever blasphemies they utter, but whoever blasphemes against the Holy Spirit never has forgiveness, but is guilty of an eternal sin”— 30 for they were saying, “He has an unclean spirit.”

Jesus' Mother and Brothers

And his mother and his brothers came, and standing outside they sent to him and called him. And a crowd was sitting around him, and they said to him, “Your mother and your brothers are outside, seeking you.” And he answered them, “Who are my mother and my brothers?” And looking about at those who sat around him, he said, “Here are my mother and my brothers! For whoever does the will of God, he is my brother and sister and mother.” 

—Mark 2:13–3:6 ESV

INTRO

Good morning. For those of you who don’t know me, I’m Raymond. I’m a deacon here, and I also do outreach work as a chaplain. It is my pleasure to be able to fill in today, and talk about a pretty interesting and complicated and kind of confusing passage. So, before we get to all of that, let’s pray. 

Father, we thank you that we can gather, that we can worship, that we can rehearse through our worship and our liturgy, the truths that we have been liberated, set free, that our citizenship, our allegiances have been transferred. These are profound ideas, God, that may be new to some, challenging to all. And so, God, as we study this text this morning, I pray that you would give us ears to hear from your spirit, minds to understand deep truths, God, and perhaps more than anything, the courage to have imaginations enriched, and enchanted by the truth that you reveal to us. We pray these things in your name, Jesus, amen. 

So, I want to start us off with a big idea, to sort of hold in our minds as we get into the text, and that’s this:


Jesus is Israel’s long awaited Messiah, God’s anointed one. This means that he came not only take care of the individual’s sin problem, or moral problem, but also to liberate everyone from captivity to the dark powers that enslave the world. That is, the problem to which Jesus is the only solution is not just the wickedness that is found in the hearts of all of us but also the wickedness that drives the kingdoms of this world on their hell-bent course of rebellion against God.

Jesus did not just come to forgive you; he wants to set you free.

There is a lot to unpack in that summary statement. The idea that we are not just sinners apart from Christ but also slaves may be just as confusing and offensive to us now as it was to the first people to encounter Jesus two thousand years ago. We might think something like this: 

Of course on reflection I am imperfect, and of course taking care of my personal issues is of concern to God. I want to be a better person, and it’s reasonable that a good God would share that desire. Fine and good. So a personal savior who forgives and affirms me is somewhat humbling but I can take that in stride. That being said, let’s not get too superstitious or dramatic. We’ve done a pretty good job - I’ve done a pretty good job - of building a society that mitigates the worst in us and gives us some truly basic and wonderful goods: we have our rights, we have our freedoms. Do not insult me by telling me that I am a slave.

This line of thinking is not too far off of how some Jewish people regarded themselves in the days of Jesus’ earthly ministry. Imperfect? Of course. Sinners? Perhaps. Slaves? Never. As some Pharisees responded to Jesus in John’s gospel, “We have never been slaves of anyone!” (John 8.33) So when Jesus begins talking of the arrival of God’s Kingdom, as if it isn’t already present, and starts casting out demons as if they are, he immediately encounters residence. The Children of Abraham, the nation of Israel, are the chosen people of God. They are not subject to the demonic corruption and uncleanness like their pagan neighbors. Right?! But Jesus seems to indicate otherwise and it makes some people extremely, extremely angry. Angry enough to kill.

To give this some teeth, it is as if someone walked up to a proud and patriotic modern citizen and insisted their land was not, in fact, the “Land of the Free” but is actually a kingdom enslaved to the same dark powers that rule the rest of the world. 

It is the tension of a claim like this that - which I won’t go in to more - that has been bubbling and boiling as Mark’s narrative unfolds.

THE GROWING CONTROVERSY

Last week we heard about the growing controversy between Jesus and the reigning social and religious norms of his day. As Mark goes on we find that the tension only increases, the friction intensifies, and the pressure rises. Now, in Mark 3, we find nearly all of the major players of this gospel gathered together:[1]Jesus is of course central. Having declared himself capable of forgiving sins and being Lord of the Sabbath, he then comes into direct conflict with the Pharisees and the representatives of the Herodian dynasty. They are the ruling powers, they think, and they think they have been ruling well.They go from questioning Jesus to seeking his destruction, and will remain his enemies for the rest of the gospel. 

Mark then describes the gathering crowds, and once again Jesus displays his authority to them by healing the sick and subduing demons. In Mark 3.13-19 we also meet the inner circle of 12 disciples. Twelve, the number here is significant: Israel had 12 tribes, though most are now lost in exile, could it be that Israel’s Messiah is reconstituting the nation? But in this reformation Jesus does not represent one of the twelve, but is rather is the authority above them that sends them out to be a blessing. 

In the midst of this, in verse 21, we meet Jesus’ biological family, “his people.” They think he is nuts and make a plan to take him home, by force if necessary. While this plan is unfolding we also finally meet representatives of the Jerusalem elite, the religious scribes that have come down from the holy mountain to see what the fuss is all about. 

We should not underestimate the importance of Jerusalem in the political and spiritual world of first century Judea. Politically, it was the center of what remained of Israel’s power; spiritually, with its Temple to Yahweh, ancient Jews called it the “navel of the world,” the point at which heaven and earth came together. They have divine mandate to think this way: Jerusalem had been the place where the Holy Spirit of God - and that will be critically important as the text unfolds - dwelt in the midst of his people, though at the time of Jesus this presence has been conspicuously absent for a long, long time, and it had never been witnessed in the temple that had been built by Herod the Great.

So, with all these players in mind, now gathered together in Mark 3, we also find again the powers operating under the surface, the dark powers whom Jesus has already been systematically conquering. Thus far Mark has made a point of highlighting Jesus’ authority over these powers, identified as either “unclean spirits” or “demons.” For modern readers like ourselves these beings come across as rather abstract concepts. But in this chapter we find that the Jerusalem scribes get very specific. They do not suggest that Jesus is not actually accomplishing the alleged miracles. Rather, they accuse him of being possessed by “Beelzebul.” He has derived his authority from “The Ruler of Demons.”  

With this accusation the pressure-cooker of Mark’s gospel has come to a boil. But to understand what exactly is happening here, and what exactly Jesus means by his warning about “blaspheming the Holy Spirit” we need to be aware of some important biblical and historical context. That is, we need to know what is going on up to this point in the big story of what God is doing in the world, and how people during this time would have written and thought about what Jesus was doing among them.

There are a number of places to start or themes to focus on but I think the most important is not the geo-political surface but rather the emerging conflict between the “Holy Spirit” and the demonic forces of Beelzebul. Understanding this conflict in light of Israel’s prophetic scriptures is critical for understanding the central warning of this text: “Whatever you do,” Jesus seems to say, “do not blaspheme the Holy Spirit!” 

THE HOLY SPIRIT IN PROPHETIC CONTEXT

So beginning there, this is not the first reference to the Holy Spirit in Mark. From the first verse of the gospel Mark has carefully shaped his narrative around Israel’s prophecies of the coming Messiah, particularly using the Old Testament book of Isaiah who spoke of the day that God’s Messiah would arrive and with the Him the presence of God would once again be found in the midst of his people. 

Isaiah had to look forward to this day because in his present, centuries before Jesus would be born, the people of Israel had turned against their God and turned to idols and falsehoods. They had become enslaved to their own passions, their own depravities, enslaved to the wicked and hostile world around them, the world of malicious intelligences greater than themselves. They have become enslaved to their own self-destruction. 

Isaiah prophetically describes this fall from grace, 

The Lord’s Mercy Remembered 

                7 I will recount the steadfast love of the Lord,

the praises of the Lord, 

                according to all that the Lordhas granted us, 

and the great goodness to the house of Israel 

                that he has granted them according to his compassion, 

according to the abundance of his steadfast love. 

                8 For he said, “Surely they are my people, 

childrenwho will not deal falsely.” 

And he became their Savior. 

                9 In all their affliction he was afflicted, 

and the angel of his presence saved them; 

                in his love and in his pity he redeemed them; 

he lifted them up and carried them all the days of old. 

                10 But they rebelled 

and grieved his Holy Spirit

                therefore he turned to be their enemy, 

and himself fought against them. 

            —Isaiah 63:7-10 ESV

So the great tragedy of Israel was that when they were God’s covenant family they chose instead to rebel, grieve, insult, and fight against God’s Holy Spirit which was in their midst. They polluted their own land and the Jerusalem Temple itself with idols, physical representations of the dark powers that ruled the pagan nations around them. The result of this self-determined slavery is that God himself, the enemy of any that would destroy his good creation, becomes their enemy as well.

But God did not determine to fight against his rebellious people forever. As Isaiah’s prophecy continues,

         11 Then he remembered the days of old, 

of Moses and his people. 

         Where is he who brought them up out of the sea 

with the shepherds of his flock? 

         Where is he who put in the midst of them 

his Holy Spirit

         12 who caused his glorious arm 

to go at the right hand of Moses, 

         who divided the waters before them 

to make for himself an everlasting name, 

         13 who led them through the depths? 

         Like a horse in the desert, 

they did not stumble. 

         14 Like livestock that go down into the valley, 

the Spirit of the Lordgave them rest. 

         So you led your people, 

to make for yourself a glorious name. 

 —Isaiah 63:11-14 ESV

Isaiah prophesied that a new Exodus would someday be led directly by God’s Spirit itself. The beginning of the New Exodus is exactly what the “Good News,” the “Gospel” is all about: God returning again to dwell with his people. Most importantly for our passage in Mark, the Spirit would be present in the Messiah would do all of this by the power of God. Isaiah describes it this way,

 

There shall come forth a shoot from the stump of Jesse, 

and a branch from his roots shall bear fruit. 

                2 And the Spiritof the Lordshall rest upon him, 

theSpiritof wisdom and understanding, 

theSpiritof counsel and might, 

theSpiritof knowledge and the fear of the Lord. 

                3 And his delight shall be in the fear of the Lord.

                He shall not judge by what his eyes see, 

or decide disputes by what his ears hear, 

                4 but with righteousness he shall judge the poor, 

and decide with equity for the meek of the earth; 

                and he shall strike the earth with the rod of his mouth, 

and with the breath of his lips he shall kill the wicked. 

—Isaiah 11:1-14 ESV

            

This Messiah would forgive the sins of the people, free them from demonic bondage. Isaiah’s prophecy contains echoes of Psalm 2,

2 Why do the nations rage 

and the peoples plot in vain? 

                2 The kings of the earth set themselves, 

and the rulers take counsel together, 

against the Lordand against his Anointed, saying, 

                3 “Let us burst their bonds apart 

and cast away their cords from us.” 

                4 He who sits in the heavens laughs; 

the Lord holds them in derision. 

                5 Then he will speak to them in his wrath, 

and terrify them in his fury, saying, 

                6 “As for me, I have set my King 

on Zion, my holy hill.” 

                7 I will tell of the decree: 

                TheLordsaid to me, “You are my Son; 

today I have begotten you. 

                8 Ask of me, and I will make the nations your heritage, 

and the ends of the earth your possession. 

                9 You shall break them with a rod of iron 

and dash them in pieces like a potter’s vessel.” 

                10 Now therefore, O kings, be wise; 

be warned, O rulers of the earth. 

                11 Serve the Lordwith fear, 

and rejoice with trembling. 

                12 Kiss the Son, 

lest he be angry, and you perish in the way, 

for his wrath is quickly kindled. 

                Blessed are all who take refuge in him. 

 —Psalm 2 ESV

            Returning back to Isaiah, the Anointed One, the Messiah, the Christ speaks again,

61 The Spirit of the Lord God is upon me, 

because the Lordhas anointed me 

                to bring good news to the poor; 

he has sent me to bind up the brokenhearted, 

                to proclaim liberty to the captives, 

and the opening of the prison to those who are bound; 

                2 to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor, 

  —Isaiah 61:1-2 ESV. 

            Mark does not record Jesus quoting this scripture, but Luke does


THE HOLY SPIRIT IN MARK, JESUS THE ANOINTED ONE, AND THE DARK POWERS

Nevertheless, it is no accident that Mark introduces Jesus as the Christ, the anointed, who announces the good news. It is not accidental that John the Baptist knows that he is the one preparing the way for this, and that the Anointed Messiah would be the one who would baptize God’s wayward people with his Holy Spirit, once again sealing them as his covenant family. In Mark, it is the Holy Spirit that descends upon Jesus and marks him out as God’s beloved Son, just as we read from Psalm 2. It is God’s Holy Spirit who then sends Jesus out into the wilderness to overcome the temptations of the Devil, thus prepared to return to God’s enemies in order to set them free from their slavery. 

Jesus forgives sins and casts out demons, and because all of the people have fallen from the Glory of God even the worst of sinners can be called to follow Him forward in hope, to live in grace and freedom. Jesus does not call tax collectors and sinners to show that there is nothing wrong with them, much less to show the snooty, judgmental Pharisees that collaboration with Pagan slave masters is perfectly acceptable to God. It is not, and this is the point: Jesus calls the worst and vilest enemies of God to follow him because if God’s restorative grace is not for sinners like these then it is for no one. 

What the religious elites, the Pharisees and scribes and Herodians have missed, is that it is not just the paganized rebels and outlaws who must submit to the authority of the Messiah: God will install his king on Zion, and he will rule the Holy Mountain of Jerusalem. The one anointed with the Spirit of God walks with Yahweh’s authority, the authority to smash and cast down allrivals. So when Mark tells us that elites have come down from Jerusalem to face off with Jesus the Christ this is a confrontation of cosmic proportions. 

The scribes of Jerusalem, seeing the building evidence of Jesus’ authority make a calculated accusation: his authority comes from Beelzebul. This term is a title as much as a name that can be translated either “Lord of the Flies” or “Lord of the House.” In ancient thought, both of these titles are related to the practices of pagan worship. Zeus the King of the gods, was sometimes titled the “lord of flies” because it was thought that he protected pagan animal sacrifices from the polluting influence of swarms of flies.[2]Alternatively, “Lord of the House” may be a reference to the many temples, houses of the gods, found everywhere in the ancient world. 

According to some 1stcentury Jews, Beelzebul is the ruler and protector of all demonic power. This is what the scribes claim to be true of Jesus. In the Testament of Solomon, a Jewish text not found in the Bible, but which likely dates from the first century, Beelzebul is questioned by King Solomon,

“Beelzeboul, what is thy employment?” And he answered me: 

“I destroy kings. I ally myself with foreign tyrants. And my own demons I set on to men, in order that they may believe in them and be lost. 

And the chosen servants of God, priests and faithful men, I excite unto desires for wicked sins, and evil heresies, and lawless deeds; and they obey me, and I bear them on to destruction. 

And I inspire men with envy, and desire for murder, and for wars and sodomy, and other evil things. And I will destroy the world.”[3]

So when the scribes of Jerusalem make their accusation we should not be confused about the terrible gravity of their claim. Jesus is not Yahweh’s anointed, he is the ruler of demons.

 

Slide 13: Daemons

The Greek word “daemon” is taken over by Jewish writers from Greco-Roman thought. Daemons in this rival worldview are not the Halloween caricatures that we are used to. They are the gods of pagan pantheism. When Hebrew writers worked to translate their scriptures into Greek they used this word to represent a whole host of biblical figures. Biblical scholar Dale Martin observes,

“Ancient Jews thus used [“daemon”] to translate five or six different Hebrew words. In the original Near Eastern context, those words referred to different kinds of beings: goat-man gods; superhuman beings that either are or cause diseases; abstract qualities or goods that may also be seen as gods, such as Fortune or Fate. What they have in common, nonetheless, is that they all were thought of as gods – in fact, as the gods other people falsely worship: the gods of the nations.”[4]

The most straight-forward biblical example of this is the Greek translation of Psalm 96.5 (95.5 LXX), “All the gods of the nations are demons.” 

Far from being the malicious, hateful, frightening beings we are used to seeing in art and fantasy, daemons were for the ancient Greeks much more complicated. There were evil spirits, the cacodaemons, but more important for worship and service were those beings that were overwhelmingly beneficial. “Fortune,” “Peace,” “Happiness” or “Wealth” could be represented as daemons. 

Slide 14: Daemon at Herculaneum Fresco

            Here is a depiction of a daemon from Herculaneum, the town destroyed with Pompeii in 79 AD, not long after Mark would have been written. 

Slide 15: Euphrosyne and Acratus

In this slide we see Euphrosyne, Good Cheer, and Acratus, Ease, depicted as daemons. 

Slide 16: Erotes

And here are depictions of the daemons Erotes who were thought to insight lovers to erotic delights. We should pay careful attention to the fact that these frescos and mosaics were not just found in hidden, secretive, and sacred contexts. They were on full display in the entry ways and living areas of people’s homes. Their appeal is obvious. Further, those devoted to these figures were not what we normally think of as “demon possessed.” Of course we have in scripture descriptions of the demoniac lunatic confined to the outskirts of society. But what would an individual devoted to Good Cheer, Fortune, or Fury look like in society? The jovial socialite, the prosperous businesswoman, or the accomplished soldier? We are so used to thinking about demons in terms of horror movie tropes that we can remain ignorant that in the crucial historical context of the Bible demonic devotion paid rich dividends.

In Roman texts, the Latin term for “daemon” was “genius” and worship of the geni-i of rich, powerful, benevolent figures was common. 

Slide 17: Genius of Augustus

The genius of Caesar Augustus, here depicted in marble, was widely venerated. We should remember that while statues like these would have stood in temples and been worshipped, what was really being worshipped and served was the power and benevolence of the Roman state. Such devotion might seem completely foreign to us, but once we have the eyes to see what the biblical texts actually describes we should realize that even a privileged, modern society can host such idols. 

Slide 18: The Magnanimous Powers

But as beneficial as these daemons were thought to be they were not to be trifled with. In one of Xenophon’s Socratic dialogues, Socrates warns an impertinent student who reasons that if he can’t see demons why should he bother with them. Somewhat sarcastically he says “Really Socrates  I don’t despise daemons, but I believe they too magnanimous to need my service.” Socrates replies, ominously, “The greater the power that benefits you, the greater the service it will demand from you.”[5]

But remembering the lens that Isaiah has given us to view Israel’s current state, it is these gods represented by idols, these daemons, that the Israelites chose over the one true God. It is these gods that stand behind the human slave-masters of Israel.

As another biblical text, Deuteronomy 32:15-18 reads,

                15 “But Israel grew fat, and kicked; 

you grew fat, stout, and sleek; 

                then he forsook God who made him 

and scoffed at the Rock of his salvation. 

                16 They stirred him to jealousy with strange gods; 

with abominations they provoked him to anger. 

                17 They sacrificed to demons that were no gods, 

to gods they had never known, 

                to new gods that had come recently, 

whom your fathers had never feared. 

                18 You were unmindful of the Rock that bore you, 

and you forgot the God who gave you birth. 

 —Deuteronomy 32:15-18 ESV

 

 When the false gods of wealth, power, happiness, and the state are venerated the cost and consequences are slavery. It is precisely these false gods, these demons, that would be overcome by the coming Anointed one, just as Moses, by the power of God, overcame the gods of the Egyptians during the Exodus. It is for this reason that the many exorcisms described in the Gospels are not just proofs or magic tricks. The people of Israel are seeing their deliverance enacted before their very eyes. 

And the elites of Jerusalem reject it.

JESUS’ REBUTTAL

In Mark 3.23, Jesus begins his rebuttal. Rather than merely a flat denial, Jesus leans into their logic and turns it against them. They are correct: there are indeed two rival Kingdoms. He drops name Beelzebul in favor of another, Satan. This too is a title and can simply mean “the adversary.” Satan can be a single identity, or the Satan may stand for the seething mass of enemies that lie inside of his power and authority.

If Satan casts itself out of the people he rules, Jesus reasons, then one Kingdom has turned on itself. This is not just civil war, but certain destruction. Likewise, a “house,” perhaps an allusion to Beelzebul as the “Lord of the House,” which turns on itself will also fall. The dynasty of the devil would fall to pieces. The assumption underlying this logic is that the Satan has already gained control of the house of Israel. The prophetic indictment is true: long ago Israel turned from the one, true God and is now in bondage. If this is the case then why would the enemy which has already been victorious turn upon itself and undo its victory? Obviously, this would be absurd. 

What is in fact happening, as Jesus goes on to explain, is that the house of the strong man is being plundered. His possessions will become the spoils of another. “The Ruler of the House” is being bound. By using this illustration Jesus once again alludes to the prophecies of Isaiah. 

The emancipation of Israel is described in Isaiah 49.24-26 in graphic terms,

24 Can the prey be taken from the mighty, 

or the captives of a tyrant be rescued? 

25 But thus says the Lord: 

Even the captives of the mighty shall be taken, 

and the prey of the tyrant be rescued; 

for I will contend with those who contend with you, 

and I will save your children. 

26 I will make your oppressors eat their own flesh,

and they shall be drunk with their own blood as with wine. 

Then all flesh shall know 

that I am the Lordyour Savior, 

and your Redeemer, the Mighty One of Jacob. 

 —Isaiah 49: 24-26 ESV

            God himself will contend with the mighty tyrant, the strong man, and plunder his house of all that he has taken. The tyrant will so completely overcome that “all flesh,” that is, “all humankind” will know that God is the Savior and Redeemer of Israel. He, rather than the Satan, is the “Mighty One.” 

            The many exorcisms are not just morality plays about individual deliverance: these mighty works are evidence of cosmic upheaval. Once again Jesus has identified himself using the language of Isaiah’s prophecies, this time casting himself in the role of Mighty One, the breaker and binder and despoiler of tyrants, God himself. With each confrontation Jesus demonstrates that the Dark Kingdom behind the kingdoms of this world is being overthrown and its tyrant is being cast down and plundered. Liberation from the self-inflicted wounds of idolatry and spiritual adultery is at hand and is unfolding before the watching crowds. That is to say, as Jesus has already declared, the Kingdom of God has come into their midst.

BLASPHEMY AGAINST THE HOLY SPIRIT

It is at this point and flowing out of this rich, manifold context of Israel’s prophetic scriptures and Mark’s descriptions of the messianic revolution that we find the famous warning in Mark 3:28-29  … Truly, I say to you, all sins will be forgiven the children of man, and whatever blasphemies they utter, but whoever blasphemes against the Holy Spirit never has forgiveness, but is guilty of an eternal sin … What does Jesus mean? 

Pulling all of the pieces together, just this: By leveling their horrible insult the Jerusalem scribes have attributed the saving work, power, and mission of God’s chosen Messiah to the one who seeks to “destroy the world.” Jesus is not, according to them, the one foretold by Isaiah as the one anointed with God’s Holy Spirit. He is not the Mighty One plundering the house of their demonic overseers. He is not the one announcing the good news of liberation and forgiveness. By making this claim they are not just speaking against Jesus, but are actually blaspheming the very Spirit of God.

By rejecting the liberation and forgiveness that Jesus offers they are throwing away liberation itself and forgiveness itself, and it is for this reason that such blasphemy cannot be forgiven. Such rejection must resonate into eternity: it will last forever. Those that persistently assert that whatever Kingdom Jesus represents will never be one that they will join must permanently live outside of its bounds. Refusing to submit to the will of God they will, like their forefathers, remain forever enslaved. Rejecting the Kingdom of God, they will forever take up residence in the Kingdom of another. 

All this talk of exorcisms and demonic beings might have made us uncomfortable, but are we so certain that we privileged moderns have discovered how, without God’s help, to resist the enticements of luck, fortune, wealth, national identity, and power. Even if we shrug off the suggestion that there are actual malevolent intelligences behind these temptations it would be hard to argue that they do not come to dominate our lives. 

There is one more Greek word for us to consider, not found in this passage, but one which is of profound importance: apocalypsis, unveiling revelation. When the people of God were beset by their enemies it took a prophetic voice crying out that their eyes would be opened for them to see that they were walking in an enchanted creation. What they saw was horrifying and beautiful, a world haunted by devils but also infused with the presence of God.

The Satan, the seething, many-headed, many-formed adversary would love nothing more than to convince us that none of this revelation is true. He would love nothing more than to convince us that we are truly alone, or at least that God remains in his distant heaven and devils only exist in the fantasies of lunatics or superstitious fools. We must allow the Spirit of God to once again capture our imaginations so that we, with unveiled eyes, might see the horror and beauty of the world-that-truly-is. We must not forget the world that we actually live in.

If your time, talent, and treasure are devoted to these things can you be so sure that you are not in fact possessed by these things? If you are not only willing to live for them but also die and even kill for them what does that tell you? An ancient observer may well be forgiven the judgment that our noble pluralism is just as pagan a system as their own. They might even warn us with Socrates’ words to his skeptical student, “The greater the power that benefits you, the greater the service it will demand from you.”

How then are we to escape?  

            This challenge resonates into our present. It is a call that has come to all of us. We, like the crowds, the sinners, the tax-collectors, the disciples, and the scribes are faced with a decision: what will we do with Jesus? In a passage like Mark 3, He leaves us with few options. 

C.S. Lewis famously describes these options as a trilemma,

“[There is a] the really foolish thing that people often say about [Jesus]: I’m ready to accept Jesus as a great moral teacher, but I don’t accept his claim to be God. That is the one thing we must not say. A man who was merely a man and said the sort of things Jesus said would not be a great moral teacher. He would either be a lunatic — on the level with the man who says he is a poached egg — or else he would be the Devil of Hell. You must make your choice. Either this man was, and is, the Son of God, or else a madman or something worse. You can shut him up for a fool, you can spit at him and kill him as a demon or you can fall at his feet and call him Lord and God, but let us not come with any patronizing nonsense about his being a great human teacher. He has not left that open to us. He did not intend to.”[6]

We see two of these approaches in Mark 3. The Jerusalem scribes regarded Jesus as the devil of hell. They are turned away with a terrifying rebuke. In passage we also meet the biological family of Jesus. They, at this point in the narrative, regard him as the lunatic and attempt to take him in hand. They too are rejected. 

But why can’t Jesus just be a great moral teacher? For those that are self-conscious enough to recognize their own sin, and this is nearly everyone, this is an attractive option. It does not take much humility to admit to imperfection and to look for moral instruction from great teachers. The gentle-Jesus-meek-and-mild who forgives sins and teaches us to love each other is therefore basically attractive to basically everyone. What this caricature ignores is what Lewis points towards: the absolute and exclusive loyalty to God that Jesus demands of his followers. Those that follow him must submit themselves to the authority of God, that is, they must repent, and they must join themselves to His Kingdom. 

Nevertheless, it is remarkably common to claim that Jesus, like all good moral teachers, simply taught that the “Golden Rule” is sufficient. But this allegedly “golden rule” is then presented as the command to love others as we love ourselves. It does not seem to occur to those who make this claim that this is not at all what Jesus actually said. He is clear, the first and foremost commandment is to love the LORD your God will all that you have. This is the “great commandment.” 

But this commandment goes far beyond a do-gooding approach to moral life which followed the alleged “golden rule.” Jesus primary call and command is about absolute allegiances. 

Who is your God? 

Who will Lord over your life and whose Kingdom will you build? 

To put it another way, whose house will you live in and who will be your Father? 

We must now go back to the idea we started with: Of course Jesus came to forgive our sins, this is fundamental, but Jesus did not come to merely dismiss our minor imperfections or show us a better, more moral way of life. He came to liberate us from spiritual slavery. As the Apostle Paul write’s, God has delivered us from the dominion of darkness into the Kingdom of his beloved son (Col. 1). 

The disciples, in the closing verses of Mark 3, are gathered around their Lord. After dismissing the pleas of his biological mother and brothers who wish to arrest a lunatic Jesus makes an amazing claim. Gesturing to those gathered with him he declares, “Behold my mother and my brothers! For whoever does the will of God, he is my brother and sister and mother.” Just as the ancient prophecies foretold, God’s Messiah would recreate the covenant family. The Children of God are not, as popular civic religion would have it, everyone. It is only those who submit to God’s rule, who join themselves to him in covenant loyalty, who submit to his will, only these are born anew, adopted, into His divine family. They have left the house of the strong tyrant because they have followed the Mighty One into his victory. They were once slaves, now they have now been fellow heirs of a dynasty that will last forever. 

CONCLUSION

With this we return to the big idea we started out with:

 Jesus came not only take care of our individual sin problem but also to liberate us from captivity to the dark powers that enslave us and the whole world. That is, the problem to which Jesus is our only solution is not just the wickedness that is found in each of our hearts but also the wickedness that drives the kingdoms of this world on their hell-bent course of rebellion against God.

Jesus did not just come to forgive you; he wants to set you free.

 

Let’s pray. 

Father, 

We thank you for your word, we thank you for the way you challenge us. Thank you for liberating us, for setting us free. Father, I do pray, again, for a conversion of the imagination, for eyes to see an unveiling revelation of the world as it truly is. Lord, I pray that you would make us a church where that is true, where we live out the reality that we belong to you, are citizens of your kingdom, and have been set free to build and to grow and to thrive, and to bless. We pray these things in your name, amen. 

[1]Watts

[2]Pausanias 5.14.2; 8.26.7.

[3]Test. Sol. 6

[4]Dale Martin JBL 129, no 4. 2010. Pg 662.

[5]Xenophon, Memorabilia, 1.4.10.

[6]Mere Christianity


A New Way of Relating-Full Sermon Transcript

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JULY 7, 2019 // MARK 2:13 - 3:6 // A NEW WAY OF RELATING

PASTOR: VINNIE HANKE

SCRIPTURE READING

“He went out again beside the sea, and all the crowd was coming to him, and he was teaching them. And as he passed by, he saw Levi the son of Alphaeus sitting at the tax booth, and he said to him, “Follow me.” And he rose and followed him. And as he reclined at table in his house, many tax collectors and sinners were reclining with Jesus and his disciples, for there were many who followed him. And the scribes of the Pharisees, when they saw that he was eating with sinners and tax collectors, said to his disciples, “Why does he eat with tax collectors and sinners?” And when Jesus heard it, he said to them, “Those who are well have no need of a physician, but those who are sick. I came not to call the righteous, but sinners.” Now John’s disciples and the Pharisees were fasting. And people came and said to him, “Why do John’s disciples and the disciples of the Pharisees fast, but your disciples do not fast?” And Jesus said to them, “Can the wedding guests fast while the bridegroom is with them? As long as they have the bridegroom with them, they cannot fast. The days will come when the bridegroom is taken away from them, and then they will fast in that day. No one sews a piece of unshrunk cloth on an old garment. If he does, the patch tears away from it, the new from the old, and a worse tear is made. And no one puts new wine into old wineskins. If he does, the wine will burst the skins—and the wine is destroyed, and so are the skins. But new wine is for fresh wineskins.” One Sabbath he was going through the grainfields, and as they made their way, his disciples began to pluck heads of grain. And the Pharisees were saying to him, “Look, why are they doing what is not lawful on the Sabbath?” And he said to them, “Have you never read what David did, when he was in need and was hungry, he and those who were with him: how he entered the house of God, in the time of Abiathar the high priest, and ate the bread of the Presence, which it is not lawful for any but the priests to eat, and also gave it to those who were with him?” And he said to them, “The Sabbath was made for man, not man for the Sabbath. So the Son of Man is lord even of the Sabbath.” Again he entered the synagogue, and a man was there with a withered hand. And they watched Jesus, to see whether he would heal him on the Sabbath, so that they might accuse him. And he said to the man with the withered hand, “Come here.” And he said to them, “Is it lawful on the Sabbath to do good or to do harm, to save life or to kill?” But they were silent. And he looked around at them with anger, grieved at their hardness of heart, and said to the man, “Stretch out your hand.” He stretched it out, and his hand was restored. The Pharisees went out and immediately held counsel with the Herodians against him, how to destroy him.”

—Mark 2:13–3:6 ESV

INTRO

Good morning, church. As Forrest said, my name’s Vinnie Hanke. It’s a great pleasure to be with you this morning. It’s been an odd week, hasn’t it? We’ve had fireworks, earthquakes, Kawhi Leonard signed with the Clippers, it’s odd. But, ultimately, today is about Jesus, no matter what has gone on Monday through Saturday, amen? If this is your first time in church, or first time in a long time, we want you to relax, just take a deep breath. We don’t want anything from you today, but we do want something for you. We want you to know the peace and love that comes from acknowledging Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior. Amen, church?

We also want you to be sure that we believe two things about you today. Number one, we believe that if this is your first time here, or your first time in a long time, that you’re not here by accident. But, we believe in a sovereign God who is in control and desires to meet with you today, and he has chosen this place, and this time, and this passage, and these people all on purpose, in order that he might meet you right where you are.

As we make our way into the gospel of Mark today, something I always like to do whenever I preach in a new place or in a new book, for me, is kind of set the content and the context of where we’re at. So, real quickly, the content of the gospel of Mark. This is one of the three synoptic gospels. It’s partnered with Matthew and Luke, and they serve to teach and tell about the life, ministry, death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus Christ as Savior. Each one has its own personality, they’re own points of emphasis, and yet all are equally inspired by God. Mark seeks to answer the question, who is Jesus? In fact, this question will become the central theme of the entire gospel. Who is Jesus of Nazareth, and what is the good news that is the gospel about him? That’s our content. 

Readers in Mark will see Jesus’ entrance into his ministry, his selection of the 12 disciples in chapters 1-3, they’re follow Jesus as he teaches and travels in chapters 4-8, they’ll watch as Jesus suffers, and sacrifices in chapters 9-15, and then they will ultimately rejoice as Jesus is resurrected and raised in glory in chapter 16.

Our context today is Mark chapter 2 verse 13 through chapter 3 verse 6, which we just heard read for us. Mark will provide a recounting of Jesus’ calling of Levi, continue to turn up the heat on Jesus’ confrontation with the Pharisees. Here’s my main idea. If you like to take notes inside your Mark journal or on your phone inside your fake Bible, Jesus has created a new way of relating to God that is free from religious try-hardism, and entirely built on his grace towards sinners. That’s where we’re headed today. WiIl you pray with me?

Father God, 

I thank you for this morning. I thank you for the people, God, and the purpose of Emmaus Church, to bring you glory, and to make disciples, and to love their community. I thank you, Father, and am humbled that you would allow me to open your Word with them. I pray, God, that you would forgive me of my sins, God, anything in the places where I’ve grown weak and weary, and you would allow me to deliver your Word carefully and clearly to your people God, that are here. God, we pray these things that by your Spirit, you would teach us what we know not, you would give to us what we have not, and you would form in our character what we are not. And, God, we ask these things at this time, ultimately, for your glory. We keep none for ourselves, and we ask this through Christ our Savior, amen. 

I. JESUS CALLS LEVI (vv2:13-2:14)

Amen, let’s begin. Beginning in Chapter 2, verse 13 … He went out again beside the sea, and all the crowd was coming to him, and he was teaching them. And as he passed by, he saw Levi the son of Alphaeus sitting at the tax booth, and he said to him, “Follow me.” And he rose and followed him …  If you were here last week, you know that Pastor Forrest delivered a message on Jesus’ ability to create a deeper healing, a soul healing and meet our greatest need. As we watch Jesus not only heal a paralytic man at the behest of his friends, but also forgive his sins. From there, Jesus continues his teaching and ministry, he again is going to press up against the sea as the crowds around Jesus are ultimately attracted to him. This is a guy who is teaching with authority, who is performing not only supernatural work, but is carrying with him an influence in his community. 

And, as he makes his way along with the crowd out toward the sea, he encounters a man sitting in a tax booth named Levi. And, Jesus looks at Levi and says two simple words … follow me. And, Levi responds with two simple actions … he gets up, and follows him. One of the things that’s interesting here, is Mark leaves out the content of what Jesus was teaching right now. He’s going to begin a section intended to describe the conflict between Jesus and the religious leaders of the day. As Jesus and the crowd are making their way out to the sea, he calls Levi the tax collector.

Now, we might miss this if we’re not first century Jews. Any first century Jews in here? Okay, I didn’t think so. What Jesus has just done is a social and religious taboo here, inviting a tax collector to become a disciple, to follow him. Tax collectors, in general, are not popular folk. No love songs are written about tax collectors. Now, a jewish tax collector working for Rome, an occupying nation, were extremely unpopular. Think about this. Think about this, if the nation of Canada invaded the United States. I know, it’s far fetched, but let’s just say our Canadian brothers and sisters decide that they’re going to invade our country. They ultimately overthrow the government, take over everything, and then they set up local tax houses, and then some of your fellow American citizens go to work at those tax houses. They would not be very popular folk, would they?

That’s who Levi is. He’s a Jewish man, working for the occupying nation of Rome. The tax collectors became equally, if not more, despised than the Romans. They were dishonest, they often used intimidation and even force, and had regular context with Gentiles. All of this would have made them ceremonially unclean according to Jewish religious law. Think of having a bad case of the religious cooties. Remember the cooties, right? Whereby contact with someone who had cooties then transferred the cooties to you? That’s, essentially, the ceremonial unclean law of the first century Jewish temple. Who knew second graders were such religious zealots? 

Jesus continues to break cultural and social bounds by inviting Levi to being a part of his company of disciples. Like Peter, Andrew, James, and John as we saw in chapter 1, Levi responded to the call by leaving his secular work and following Jesus, becoming a disciple. Tradition tells us that Levi will be renamed as the disciple Matthew. Levi follows Jesus, there is an immediacy to the response of Jesus’ call. And, no doubt, this is not just an external call, but Jesus was doing something in Levi’s soul in that moment, when he invited him to come and belong. This might beg us to investigate our own soul this morning and say, what might we need to leave behind to follow where Jesus calls? Is there a level of comfort, security, or identity that we continue to cling to despite Jesus’ ongoing call to follow him where he would lead?

II. JESUS SHARES A MEAL WITH SINNERS (vv. 2:15-2:17)

Verse 15 … And as he reclined at table in his house, many tax collectors and sinners were reclining with Jesus and his disciples, for there were many who followed him … So, what we do, is we shift from Jesus teaching along the seaside, calling Levi to now, probably later in the afternoon and evening, Jesus and his disciples and many from the crowd have made their way back to Levi’s house. If you’ll excuse me, I have a Bible nerd moment. The word disciple, here, in verse 15, appears … [AUDIO BREAK] … in Mark. It’s an indication of how important discipleship is in the gospel of Mark. The word disciple simply means to be a learner. But, the disciples of Jesus were meant to be more than just students. They were devoted not just to his teaching, but even more so to him as a person. Jesus intended them to become ministers to the needs of others.

As we examine this scene in Levi’s house, the doctor Luke, from his gospel, will tell us this little bit of information in Like 5:29 when he says … Levi made him [Jesus] a great feast in his house, and there as a large company of tax collectors and others reclining at table with him … Jesus calls Levi to become a disciple, and Levi immediately responds by following Jesus, and then having a party in which he invites friends over, so they too can meet Jesus. The love of Jesus, for all kinds of sinners, his initiative in going and seeking them out, giving them full acceptance, and his desire to have a close relationship with them, was a new and revolutionary element in religious and moral standards of his day. Jesus was turning outcasts into insiders. 

If this morning you feel, or have felt like an outcast, you are welcome here. For, you are in a room full of outcasts, that Jesus has welcomed in. Levi’s life is impacted by Jesus to such a degree that he immediately wants to see others impacted. 

I’ll give you a little math equation this morning. I didn’t create this, I’ve stolen it like every good pastor, but it reads this way … a gospeled life, plus relational proximity, times gospel clarity, equals missional impact. I’m ready for a seminary thesis. Let me break it down, here’s what I mean. What do I mean by a gospel life? A life transformed and changed by Jesus. If there are things that were true about you before Jesus that are no longer true, your life has been changed. If there were things that were untrue about your life before Jesus that are now true, your life has been changed. As you live that changed and transformed life out in the world amongst your family, and friends, and coworkers, and community, that’s relational proximity, the people around you. If you will be clear, that is, if you will use your words to describe why your life is different because of Jesus, you will see missional impact. That is, you will see more disciples made.

That’s what Levi’s doing here. His life has been changed and transformed by Jesus. All of a sudden, he’s left with this outcast position, and become an insider with Jesus and his disciples. And so, he immediately goes to those who he is relationally proximally close with, his friends, his neighbors, his fellow tax collectors, sinners, the fellow outcasts, and he says, hey, you’ve got to meet this guy. You’ve got to hear him teach, you’ve got to hear him talk bout … you’ve got to just be in his presence. So, I’m going to smoke a big pork butt, and we’re going to all get together, and we’re going to have a feast together. It probably wasn’t pork butt, because he’s a first century Jew. See? When you leave your notes, you just get into trouble. We’re going to have Jewish barbeque, and we’re going to have a good time, is what Levi said to his friends, and you’ve got to meet Jesus. And then, they’re going to be clear, Jesus is going to be clear about his message and mission with them, and that’s going to result in more disciples made. 

The same is true for us, living in Southern California in 2019. If we will live lives that have been transformed by Jesus, if we will remain in relational proximity for those who do not know Jeus, and we will be clear about why our lives are different and changed, we will see God use that to reach more people

Verse 16 …  And the scribes of the Pharisees, when they saw that he was eating with sinners and tax collectors, said to his disciples, “Why does he eat with tax collectors and sinners?”  … This and the following two sections are going to deal with what Pharisees consider a religious deficiency in the eating habits of Jesus and his disciples. They are unsatisfied with his religious eating habits. How religious do you have to be to be concerned about the eating habits of another human being? The scribes and the Pharisees will quickly become today’s version of a social media troll. They will constantly search over Jesus’ timeline to point out mistakes, cast judgements, and ignite displeasure among the people over Jesus. Jesus and the early church were often criticized for associating with undesirable characters, and Mark is going to justify Jesus’ practice by showing how the changed lives of the people glorify God. 

By the way, this is the typical response of the religious to the grace and mercy of Jesus. They begin to cast stones. They don’t celebrate and join in at those who are outcast becoming insiders, no, they begin to throw stones. Why would you associate with that person? People are getting to know Jesus and hearing the truth, and the religious are only worried about what kind of people are in the room with Jesus. You see, the scribes and Pharisees prided themselves on living a life of complete religious obligations. Through their lens of interpretation, the law of Moses from the Old Testament contained 613 commandments, 248 positive actions, things they had to do, and 365 negative actions, things they were not to do. These laws were worn like a great, big merit badge by the Pharisees. There were laws for who, for how to, and from whom you could purchase food, and with whom it was safe to eat. 

Now, what’s the big deal with sharing a meal? Why would they become frustrated or curious why Jesus would do such a thing? Well, one of the reasons is the way that people ate might be different from the way you and I might eat today. You and I head into McDonalds, we both order our meals, we each get a separate tray, we sit down, you’ve got your food, I’ve got my food. Never the twain shall meet, unless you’re close to someone, and even then you’ve got to ask permission, right? You can’t just go be stealing fries, it’s just bad form. But, in Jesus’ day, everything was served family style, which meant if Jesus and his friends were going to go to McDonalds - again, probably not McDonalds because he’s a first century Jewish rabbi - but if they were going to sit at McDonalds, they don’t get a just 10 mcnugget box, they get a whole plate full of mcnuggets that they’re all going to share, and they don’t get a little individual sauce packet, they get a whole bowl of hot mustard sauce together, which means every time I’m going to eat, I’m going to take a chicken nugget from the communal bowl, and I’m going to dip it into the communal sauce bowl, which means my food is going to touch your food, our hands are going to be in the same bowl together. And, for the religious leaders, they could not abide by that, because if you were unclean and my mcnugget touched your mcnugget, now I would be unclean. 

So, they have an objection that Jesus would sit with such people, and potentially become ceremonially unclean. See, I like to call Mark the action movie gospel. Doubtless, if you’ve read through the first two chapters, you’ve seen the word immediately several times. Mark wants to use a swiftness of movement and action, and what he’s doing right now, is he’s slowly beginning to turn up the pressure cooker between Jesus and the Pharisees. And, right now at the beginning of our passage together, the concern with how Jesus is eating it, by the end of our passage together, they’re going to be ready to kill him. 

Verse 17 … And when Jesus heard it, he said to them, “Those who are well have no need of a physician, but those who are sick. I came not to call the righteous, but sinners.” … Jesus responds to the question of the Pharisees, and his response is simple, it is beautiful, and it is devastating. Jesus is with those who are willing to acknowledge their need. Because, here’s the reality. What we know from the rest of the teaching of scripture, is that ultimately no one is righteous, but rather all are sinners in need of the grace and salvation and the call of Jesus. And, perhaps this is the greatest hurdle that we face in our coming to Jesus, is to understand our sinfulness in front of the eyes of a holy God. See, the gospel continues to save us as we are continuing to acknowledge our need for grace. 

Coming to the realization that you are sick, that you are broken, that you are a sinner, is not a one time thing where you said a prayer at a Sunday school 30 years ago, and now you’re good. It is a daily recognizing our need for Jesus. That, God, apart from your sin and mercy, I am broken and lost. That apart from your intervention through your son, Jesus Christ, I’m lost. I’m separated. There is no hope. When you come back daily to that need, you are immediately aware, once again, every morning of what the scripture tells us that God’s mercies are made knew every day. And, that’s what Jesus is getting at here that he has come not to call the righteous, for they have no need. But, to call the sinner, in the same way the doctor doesn’t spend a whole lot of time with not sick people, the gospel will continue to save us as we are continuing to acknowledge our need for grace. 

The structure of the next section as we continue to make our way, Mark’s going to do three things. He’s going to set the scene for us, he’s going to tell us what’s going on, there’s going to be an accusation or a question lobbed at Jesus, and then Jesus is going to respond. 

III. PHARISEES ACCUSE JESUS & JESUS RESPONDS (vv2:18-2:24)

Verse 18 … Now John’s disciples and the Pharisees were fasting. And people came and said to him, “Why do John’s disciples and the disciples of the Pharisees fast, but your disciples do not fast?” … Essentially, Jesus, why aren’t you following the religious tradition that everybody else is doing? Well, why aren’t you continuing in the pattern that is socially and culturally acceptable? 

Verse 19 …  And Jesus said to them, “Can the wedding guests fast while the bridegroom is with them? As long as they have the bridegroom with them, they cannot fast. The days will come when the bridegroom is taken away from them, and then they will fast in that day. No one sews a piece of unshrunk cloth on an old garment. If he does, the patch tears away from it, the new from the old, and a worse tear is made. And no one puts new wine into old wineskins. If he does, the wine will burst the skins—and the wine is destroyed, and so are the skins. But new wine is for fresh wineskins.” … Jesus really has a way of making clear things muddy, doesn’t he? So the scene is set. John’s disciples and the Pharisee’s disciples, and the Pharisees themselves are all fasting. The question is made, hey Jesus, why aren’t you doing that thing? Why aren’t you and your disciples fasting? That is, why aren’t you refraining from food for a period of time, out of religious devotion?

Jesus answers the question of the people using three illustrations. A wedding guest on a diet, a bad seamstress, and a lazy bartender. The first illustration is a wedding guest on a diet. It would be odd and out of place, wouldn’t it? I mean, a wedding is a time of celebration. If you go to a good wedding, there’s going to be a good meal there. I’m talking about that rubbery chicken, I’m talking about steak or something hearty. And, it would be out of place at a moment of celebration for you to suddenly decide, you know what? I’m going to go on a diet, and I’m fine with these little mints on the table. No, you would partake in the celebration and in the meal. It would be an insult to the guests, and to the celebration around you, to refrain from enjoying the feast. As Jesus answers the people, it would be odd for my disciples to fast at this time for I am among them, celebration is now. As we’ve heard Pastor Forrest talk about last week, the kingdom of God is at hand. There will be a day - Jesus alludes to his death here - there will be a day when it will be appropriate for them to fast, when I depart from them. It’s a small illusion to what’s coming next. 

Jesus continues, he talks about a bad seamstress, someone who takes an unshrunk piece of cloth and tries to sew it on an old piece of cloth, that way it would lead to a greater tear. Again, something out of place. It doesn’t fit. And then, finally the lazy bartender who would put new wine into old wineskins, ultimately creating them to burst. What Jesus is alluding to here with each one of these, is that the kingdom of God is something new, that Jesus is doing a new thing, that he is bringing the reality and the revelation of what everything from before him has meant, and it’s to try to fit Jesus and the kingdom of God into the religious conception of what the Jewish Pharisees and religious leaders have made it out to be, would not fit. Essentially, the old religious structure will not hold the kingdom of God. It’s too big, it’s too great, it’s too magnificent, and it’s too beautiful. 

The legalism of religious obligation will not stand in the kingdom, rather it will be relational obedience. The way to God is not through religious practices, but through joyful faith and association with Jesus. The way to God that Jesus is creating is not through religious practices. The old way that the Pharisees related to God, by obedience to a law that they interpreted and created for themselves, would not be the way to God, but rather through joyful faith and association with Jesus. And, what was true of Jesus in the first century is true of today. Going to church will not get you to eternity. Writing a check will not get you to eternity. Conducting a Bible study will not get you to eternity. It is only through joyful faith and association with the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ, that will get you to eternity. 

Verse 23 … One Sabbath he was going through the grainfields, and as they made their way, his disciples began to pluck heads of grain … So, think about this. You’re walking through a field of grain, and as the disciples are walking along, they’re just plucking a few heads of grain, okay? Just kind of walking along, same as if you were going on a hike and you saw some berries and you knew they were safe to eat, you might pluck a few, plop them in your mouth, and continue on your journey. 

Verse 24 … And the Pharisees were saying to him, “Look, why are they doing what is not lawful on the Sabbath?” And he said to them, “Have you never read what David did, when he was in need and was hungry, he and those who were with him: how he entered the house of God, in the time of Abiathar the high priest, and ate the bread of the Presence, which it is not lawful for any but the priests to eat, and also gave it to those who were with him?” And he said to them, “The Sabbath was made for man, not man for the Sabbath. So the Son of Man is lord even of the Sabbath.” … The last two sections of the five conflicts that Mark will describe for us, deal with the observance of the Sabbath. The scene is set. It’s the Sabbath day, and Jesus and the disciples are walking. An accusation is levied against the disciples, that they are actually working on the Sabbath. So, again, you’ve got to hear the ridiculousness and the accusation. These are men who are just walking through a field, plucking heads of grain, and the Pharisees accuse them of actually reaping, harvesting. In answer, Jesus recalls a time when David breaks ceremonial religious law to meet the needs of the men who were with him. Jesus closes with a statement that the Sabbath was made for man, and not man for the sabbath. We also hear Jesus’ statement that he, himself, is Lord even of the Sabbath. 

See, the religious leaders had taken the Sabbath and created a burden instead of a blessing. They had taken this thing that God had set aside for man to rest, and enjoy God, and creation, and rest from his work, and they turn it into a religious burden that these men, these people of their day, were to obey. So you’d become so freaked out that you didn’t want to violate Sabbath law, that you ended up doing nothing. It wasn’t a sense of freedom and joy around the Sabbath in this time, but a sense of religious obligation. And, what we see Jesus do here in his answer, he gives us this great truth, that Jesus set forth a basic principle, that human need should take precedence over ceremonial and religious laws. Alluding to the time, again, when David and his men invade the temple and eat the ceremonial bread which would have been reserved for priests, breaking all ceremonial and religious law.

This, too, begs the question, I might ask, where do we do this? Where might we be taking the blessing of God and making it a burden to others? Where might we be taking the get-to’s that God gives us, and making them have-to’s? That’s what the Pharisees and the scribes had done, here, with the sabbath. They turned that which was meant as a gift to man, and flipped it upside down, and created it as a religious obligation that man must serve. The Sabbath was designed by God in order to serve man, not the other way around.

IV. JESUS HEALS, AND THE PHARISEES PLOT TO KILL (vv3:1-3:6)

Our final section, Mark chapter 3, verses 1-6 … Again he entered the synagogue … This was his natural, regular pattern to teach and preach among the synagogues and the towns that he traveled to … and a man was there with a withered hand. And they watched Jesus, to see whether he would heal him on the Sabbath, so that they might accuse him … You could see just in the few short verses, probably within a short amount of time, the Pharisees go from asking questions about Jesus’ behavior, hey why would he eat with such people? To, now just living with an attitude and a spirit of bitterness and accusation. They’re watching Jesus as he’s in the synagogue worshiping, and they’re watching the man with the withered hand, and they’re just waiting to call foul. They’re just waiting to lob an accusation. Is Jesus going to do something good? Is he going to heal that man? Is he going to change that person’s life forever? How dare he, is the heart of the Pharisee. 

Verse 3 … and he said to the man with the withered hand, “Come here.” And he said to them … In this description in chapter 3, Mark flips the scenario. He sets the scene, Jesus is in the synagogue, there’s a man with the withered hand, but rather than the accusation or question coming at Jesus from others, now Jesus is going to lob his own question. 

Verse 4 … And he said to them, “Is it lawful on the Sabbath to do good or to do harm, to save life or to kill?”  It would seem like a simple answer, shouldn’t it? Like, of course we would say, the Sabbath, we must do good on the Sabbath, of course we should save a life on the Sabbath. But, the Pharisees had created such laws and such an entanglement of what morality and goodness look like on the Sabbath, the people might not even be sure what Jesus’ answer was. The Pharisees respond with simple silence at the end of verse 4. 

Verse 5 … And he looked around at them with anger, grieved at their hardness of heart … I like the New English Bible version of this, Mark 3:5 … And Jesus, looking around at them with anger and sorrow at their obstinate stupidity … The Pharisee’s religious try-hardism had created not people who honored the holy God, but obstinate, stupid people who thought they could behave their way their into the good graces of God. And, I might submit to you today, this morning, church, that if you are stuck in religious try-hardism, that this is one of your two fates.

See, religious try-hardism, that is, when I create a list of do’s and don’t’s for my life that i think will earn me God’s favor, I am setting myself up for one of two ends. The first end is obstinate stupidity. That is, I will become so prideful, because I will begin to list my religious achievements, that I will begin to think that God owes me, that he’s lucky to have me, that I’m so special and so benefit my local church and so benefit the kingdom of God, because I am so righteous, because look at all the things that I’ve done. Look at the money I’ve given, look at the services I’ve attended, look at the mission trips I’ve gone on. I don’t know what’s on your religious to-do list, you fill in the blank. But, whatever it is you try to do to get God to like you, that’s religious try-hardism. And, one of the fates of that is this obstinate stupidity in which you become a prideful creature, thinking that the creator owes you something. And, if that is not your fate, the other one might be worse. Because, you will realize very soon that you can’t keep the list, that you can’t get it done. And so, what are you left with? Only to recognize that your own efforts could never get God to love you, to like you, so you are left with this broken guilt and shame, often abandoning faith altogether, because you realize you’re not worthy, because you couldn’t even obey your own rules. 

This is the fate of the Pharisee lifestyle - obstinate religious stupidity and pride, or a crushing weight of guilt and shame because you’ll never be good enough. But, what Jesus does is he gives us an entirely new way of relating to God. 

Verse 5 … and he looked around at them with anger, grieved at their hardness of heart, and said to the man, “Stretch out your hand.” He stretched it out, and his hand was restored. The Pharisees went out and immediately held counsel with the Herodians … the Herodians from history are those Jews who were in favor of the Roman installed Jewish government, the political party. The Pharisees hold counsel with the Herodians against Jesus, and plotting ... how to destroy him … which begs the question, exactly what Sabbath law does that one honor? See, the Pharisees are faced with a choice now. Either Jesus is who he says he is, is he the Lord of the Sabbath, able to forgive sins, and produce supernatural healing, and if so they must leave their carefully religiously choreographed lives and follow him or worship him, or they have to get rid of him, cause he’s a threat. He’s a threat to the established order. He’s a threat to their religious choreographed life. 

And so, they being obstinate, stupid religious people, decide that they cannot have Jesus in the kingdom of God, because he will not fit their image, he will not fit their pattern, he will not fit their way. And so, they begin to plot with the Herodians, a political party they would normally have nothing to do with, but they become enemies of Jesus and begin a plot to kill him.

So, I would beg of you today, would you examine in your soul what are you are clinging to and allowing to get in the way between yourself and Jesus? For the Pharisees, it was their choreographed religious life, it was their religious try-hardism. They couldn’t get it out of the way, they couldn’t leave it. And so, what we end with here in this section, is Levi, a man who left the tax booth to follow Jesus immedaitely and wholeheartedly, and the Pharisees who leave Jesus and plot to murder him.

To be a disciple of Jesus this morning, you must believe two things, and do one thing. The first thing you must believe, is like the paralytic last week, and even Levi this week, we cannot work our way into the good graces of God. That, you cannot save yourself. That, you must admit that Jesus said that you are sick, spiritually, and that there is no cure. The second thing you must believe, is that Jesus is the good doctor, the physician who comes to heal and to provide hope, that he has the power and the ability to do that which you cannot do, and through his life, death, and resurrection, has made atonement for your sin, and would call you now to be his very own, and provide healing where you need it. If this morning you are ready to believe these two things, than the final thing you must do, the Bible describes it in a variety of different ways, but in each moment it is clear it is an indication, and we must choose to follow Jesus. It would be my greatest hope and earnest prayer that every soul in this room would believe these two things, and do this one thing, that you would follow Jesus. Let’s pray. 

Father God, 

I thank you for your Word this morning. God, i just admittedly and openly confess that there are places where I have allowed religious try-hardism to creep into my soul, and ask that you would forgive me for the places I’ve grown religiously prideful, and that I’ve allowed guilt and shame to create in me an overwhelming sense of sorrow. God, would you free me and free us from this room, from religious try-hardism. When we come back to your grace, when we admit our need that we are unable to do it, but we trust that you can. Father, thank you for the pastors, and elders, and deacons, for the staff, for the congregation, Father, for those serving in children’s ministry, to those who work behind the scenes to make this place a place that preaches the gospel. I pray that you be glorified by the efforts today, that you would continue to bless the community and mission of Emmaus Church, and that you would use it to glorify yourself. We thank you, Father, and ask that you would receive our worship now, through Christ our Savior, amen. 


A New Kind of Day-Full Sermon Transcript

Link to Blog

PASTOR: FORREST SHORT

SCRIPTURE READING

“And rising very early in the morning, while it was still dark, he departed and went out to a desolate place, and there he prayed. And Simon and those who were with him searched for him, and they found him and said to him, “Everyone is looking for you.” And he said to them, “Let us go on to the next towns, that I may preach there also, for that is why I came out.” And he went throughout all Galilee, preaching in their synagogues and casting out demons. And a leper came to him, imploring him, and kneeling said to him, “If you will, you can make me clean.” Moved with pity, he stretched out his hand and touched him and said to him, “I will; be clean.” And immediately the leprosy left him, and he was made clean. And Jesus sternly charged him and sent him away at once, and said to him, “See that you say nothing to anyone, but go, show yourself to the priest and offer for your cleansing what Moses commanded, for a proof to them.” But he went out and began to talk freely about it, and to spread the news, so that Jesus could no longer openly enter a town, but was out in desolate places, and people were coming to him from every quarter.” 

—Mark 1:35–45 ESV

INTRO

Well, good morning. Good to see you all, good to be with you. My name’s Forrest, and I’m one of the pastors here at Emmaus. And, what we want to do this morning is pray right off the bat, and then we’re going to jump into our text and continue in our series in the book of Mark. So, let’s pray. 

Jesus,
We are grateful this morning for your goodness towards us. Lord, we recognize that we are weak, needful people, and that you are an all-sufficient God who meets us in our weakness. Lord, we’re grateful for that truth this morning, we’re grateful for the power and the strength of your word that comes to bear in the hearts of your people by your Spirit. And, I pray this morning that that work would be happening in each of our hearts. Lord, we ask for those this morning that may not know you as savior, Lord, we ask that you would draw them to yourself. For those of that do, Lord, we pray the same prayer. Draw us to yourself again. We ask in Jesus’ name, Amen. 

Well, again, it’s good to see you this morning. As I was studying this week, I read a modern day parable that I think sets our text up pretty well. It’s pretty short, but here’s what it says … 

There once was a man who cared so much about trees that he traveled constantly on their behalf. But, while he educated everywhere and tended personally to infected arbors far and wide, storms and swarms came through the man’s hometown from time to time. Gusts blew down the pine and oak in his own neighborhood. Their local roots, it turns out, had hollowed and weakened with weakened with rot. While he was busy and respected dispensing wisdom for bark and leaf, trees were falling in the man’s own yard. No one was there to tend them.

I think this sets our text up well. It’s easy for us to live like the arborist, isn’t it? It’s easy for us to live in the midst of the busyness and the pacing of life, to the degree that the roots in our heart and home are weakened with rot. And, what we see in the life of Jesus this morning, is that he gives us another way. And, we are in the midst of a world and culture that - quite honestly - has never been busier, has never been more inundated with requests to serve, with requests to get busy, to get about work. And, with technology today, it’s very hard to get away from those things. So, what we see with Jesus, I think, is very lifegiving. And, I think it actually is foundational to the life of believers in the modern day 21st century in the West. 

So, we’re going to look at three things here in the text. Surprise, surprise. There’s always three things in the text. Isn’t it amazing how God set up scripture so there was three point sermons throughout it? So, first … being before doing. And then, secondly … being before doing … produces word and deed living … and third … which results in holistic healing.

This is a way of life, and the way we want to look at this text this morning, is this is a new kind of day. It’s a new way to go about your day so that our work produces fruit, and not just busyness. If you remember from last week, we talked about the difference between service and busyness. They’re two very different things. And so, this, I think, digs down a little bit more into how we do that in the midst of our lives.

I. BEING BEFORE DOING…(vv35-37)

So first, being before doing. Notice verses 35-37 … And rising very early in the morning, while it was still dark, he departed and went out to a desolate place, and there he prayed. And Simon and those who were with him searched for him, and they found him and said to him, “Everyone is looking for you.” … You ever feel like that? Everyone is looking … what are you doing in the desolate place? Everyone is looking for you! They need you! From last week’s text, we learned that because of his authority and the healing that resulted from his authority, everybody, it says, in Capernaum, desired an audience with Jesus. We see that in verse 33 … and the whole city was gathered together at the door … and Jesus, it seems, worked well early into the morning healing people, meeting the physical needs.

Remember last week? We said, matter matters. Jesus created it, and he cares about it, and so the physical world is being redeemed as well. But, we see that this dynamic continues into this week’s text, this dynamic of everyone desiring an audience with him. And, it says that everybody wants you, everyone desires you. Now, what’s interesting here, is Jesus has - in this moment - what many of us long for. Jesus has, in this moment, popularity, opportunity for greatness, opportunity for mass productivity. All of you administrators out there, you’re like, oh, I get to organize this mess into something. Right? All of this opportunity is right there before him. Opportunity that, quite honestly, few of us will ever get the chance to experience. 

But, if we’re honest, isn’t it true that even when we begin to experience this, even in the smallest measure, the first thing that we lay aside is solitude, and prayer, and communion with the Father. Isn’t that often the first thing to go in the midst of busyness? In the midst of everyone desiring us, everyone needing us. But, what we see with Jesus, is that the busier he gets, the more intentional he is about prayer, the more intense he is about communion with the Father. In the midst of what seems like an incredible opportunity to capitalize on, Jesus goes out into a desolate place, into an eremos, is the word there in Greek. It’s the same word used earlier in verse 12, the same word used for wilderness in the book of Mark.

And, he most likely spent hours there, going out very early in the morning, and praying until Simon and the other disciples found him. We don’t know how long that was, but it probably wasn’t a 10 minute jaunt into the desert. He was probably out there for hours, while all of these people sought him, while he knew there were physical needs that he was not meeting. It doesn’t say that everyone was healed, it says that some were healed, so there were things left undone, and he was okay with it. In fact, essentially what he’s saying in his action is, my soul, my life depends on this communion with the Father, not on meeting needs. 

So, we don’t know how long he was out there, but he was out there for a long time, and in the midst of this opportunity even to change history, communion with the Father was too vital for Jesus, for it to be squeezed out. And, listen, if the Son of God, completely and perfectly united with the Father, recognizes in the midst of the hairy pace of life, if he recognizes his need for communion with the Father, how much more do we, as weak and easily distracted people, need that communion with the Father?

Anyone else identify with weak and easily distracted? Alright, sweet, I’m in good company this morning. We are. We are weak and easily distracted people. Now, Mark doesn’t tell us the substance of Jesus’ prayer, but if you zoom out and look at Jesus’ prayer life and look at some specific instances, I think we begin to get ahold of the substance of the prayer life of Jesus. In Mark 14, when Jesus is in Gethsemane, you remember he’s facing the reality of the cross. And, it says … he began to be greatly distressed and troubled at the work that was before him … And, he begins his prayer in Mark 14:36 with … Abba Father … 

Abba Father. When the disciples in Luke 11 ask Jesus to teach them to pray, do you remember how he starts? … Our Father … In studying this week, I read about a German scholar who was doing research in New Testament literature, and he discovered that in the entire history of Judaism, in all of these existing books of the Old Testament, and all the existing, extra-biblical Jewish writings dating from the beginning of Judaism until the 10th century A.D., there is not one single reference of a Jewish person addressing God directly in the first person as Father. Not one. The appropriate forms of address for the Jewish people were terms of respect, which is good. But, Jesus is the first Jewish rabbi to call God Father. The first in history. In fact, every recorded prayer of Jesus - except one - he calls God Father. Every single one. 

What’s going on here? Do we see what this is? Do we see what prayer is, then, for Jesus, and therefore what prayer should be for us? Our prayer life is, then, reorientation around who we are, not what we do. This is everything. When we do not work out of this reality, when we do not work out of being, but we work out of doing, we completely get the cart before the horse, and it’s just a matter of time before things go badly. Our attitude, our relationships, the culture of the very place we’re trying to dig in and do work, our prayer life is reorientation around who we are, not what we do.  

If you remember in the early part of chapter 1, in Jesus’ baptism, the Father spoke in verse 11 … you are my beloved Son, with you I am well pleased … You know what prayer is? Prayer is coming back to that again, and again, and again, and reorienting our lives around this foundational truth. This is what Paul says in Galatians 4:6 … and because you are sons, God has sent the Spirit of the Son into our hearts, crying “Abba, Father” … But, we cannot know this in our busyness, and hurry, and longing for the fast and for the famous, rather than the faithful and fruitful. 

There’s a quote from Matthew Henry, you may be familiar with him. He’s a Puritan commentator, wrote a commentary set that’s probably one of the most popular out there. He said this … 

We must study to be quiet…The most of men are ambitious of the honor of great business, and power and preferment; they covet it, they court it, they compass sea and land to obtain it; but the ambition of a Christian should be carried towards quietness. 

—Matthew Henry

To the degree that you and I know the unconditional, Fatherly love of God, is the degree that we do not need power, and comfort, and control, and approval. But, if we go to doing first, we will be operating out of one of those four source idols. Right? When we hear Jesus’ opportunity, the power and control in us says, man, what are you doing? The entire city of Capernaum is longing for you! But, we see Jesus operates out of something deeper. To the degree that you know the Fatherly love of God, is the degree that you do not need power, comfort, control, and approval, and we are not enslaved by them. We live out the freedom we have in Christ through prayer, through communion with the Father. 

Let me ask you this … How many times this past week, did you begin your day with Abba, Father? How many times this past week did you and I - before the pressures and the pace of the day hit full force - begin the day with being, not doing? I can’t tell you how many mornings I wake up, and immediately - my wife will call me on this often - why is your hair on fire? Why can’t you take 10 minutes, slow down, eat a biscuit, and drink some coffee? But, I wake up, my eyes open, and I immediately think what I have to do, what I have to get done, and the amount of time in the week I have to get it, and there’s not enough time in the week to do it. And, it doesn’t drive me to the wilderness for communion with the Father, it drives me to doing before being. But, the call of Christ and the rest of Christ, is that we are called to Abba Father every day, before the pace of the day hits.

So, I want to challenge everyone of us here, this week, see if this week everyone of us can begin the day with Abba, Father. However that looks. I know our lives are crazy, I know some of you have 37 children, all under the age of 1 that you’re trying to wrangle in your house. I know how difficult it is. I hear you. I know you don’t even get bathroom time, but lock the door, five minutes, pretend like you have to go to the bathroom, and commune with the Father. Tie the kids, put them in the closet, whatever you have to do. 

We have to fight for that in the midst of the harried pace of our lives. So, I’m going to challenge you this week, to see if you can do that. To, commit to every morning, I’m going to begin the day with Abba Father. Now, it may feel like detox, because we don’t do this, right? I actually listened to a podcast this week about this guy whose business actually goes into the most remote places he can find in the western United States, and he sets up a mic, and he records it. He just records whatever sounds he hears out there. He looks for the most silent place he can find. And, he says it’s actually very hard to find a place that’s far enough away from a highway, and not in the midst of a flight path, so that you don’t get airplane noise. 

It was very telling, in that it’s really, really hard. He actually said there’s only 9 places in the U.S. he can find where he can literally get silence for a long period of time. And so, the reporter - or, the guy who was producing the podcast - went out with him, and they sat in this place for hours in complete silence. They set up a mic, and they recorded it all. And, when the guy came out - the guy that’s producing the podcast - he came out, and he said, I’m really emotional. He’s like, I began to think about a broken relationship I had. And, essentially what he was saying, is I’ve not been silent, so I never deal with those things. See, what silence does, what solitude does, is it forces what’s deeply in there, that we can’t see in the midst of the harried pace of life, it comes to the surface. And, in the midst of that, we can remind ourselves that we are the Father’s, that we belong to him. Right?

That’s why we are human beings, not human doings. We are beings, right? It’s about who we are, not about what we do. What we do flows out of that. But, that then sets the trajectory for your day. I don’t know if you’ve noticed, but I have. That, in my life when I don’t start with that, when I don’t start with the communion with the Father, it sets the trajectory of my day, and frustration rises easily, trying to prove myself through my doing rises very easily in me. And, I like the term I heard someone use … gospel chill. He said, the older I get, the more gospel chill I have. He’s just experienced life, and he’s seen that God is good, and sovereign, and providential, and that he works in all these things, and it’s not about what I do at the end of the day, though he uses that. But, when it’s all said and done … deep breathe, Abba Father, I’m yours. Nothing can take that from me. 

So, I would encourage you in that this week. See, this is one of the aspects of the fruitfulness of Jesus’ life. It’s the joy of his sonship, and it’s what gives him joy and purpose in the midst of his ministry, in the midst of doing. And so, we must begin there.

II. …PRODUCES WORD AND DEED LIVING…(vv38-39)

So, if we begin there, being before doing produces word and deed living. It’s not being without doing, it’s being before doing, right? The doing comes afterwards. So, it produces word and deed living.

What Jesus is facing, and the people looking for him, is given a little bit more teeth in the parallel in Luke 4. Luke adds … and they urged him not to leave … So, when he’s decided to leave to go preach, they tell him no, don’t do that. So, the totality of what Jesus is facing, is that he has a large throng of people who want him to stay put, and meet their needs through his miracles. But, notice what he says in verses 38 and 39 … And he said to them, “Let us go on to the next towns, that I may preach there also, for that is why I came out.” And he went throughout all Galilee, preaching in their synagogues and casting out demons … Preaching. Jesus essentially says, I’m not just going to stay here and meet the physical needs that you know you have through miracles, but I’m going to meet he need underneath the physical needs that you don’t know you have. 

Jesus says, I have to preach. Now, we know what he’s preaching. We’ve been told that in verse 15, if you remember from a couple weeks ago … the time is fulfilled and the kingdom of God is at hand. Repent and believe the gospel … this is what he was preaching. The call, here, is to repent, to turn from self, and to turn, ultimately, to God for ultimate healing. See, when we as God’s people meet physical needs, we are responding to the needs people know they have. But, people also have spiritual needs that they don’t see as readily, and Jesus is saying, it would be unloving of me not to also preach so that those spiritual needs are met. What they need is to be reconciled to God. It’s what we all need. It’s our greatest need. 

This is the wholeness of kingdom living. Jesus calls the sinner to repent, to turn to himself, and he calls the righteous to serve. Now, believe it or not, there’s debate in the church about this. I know, it’s hard to believe that there’s debate in the church. But, there’s debate around word and deed. What do we do with that? Some people would say, hey, we just preach the gospel and that’s the most important thing, and that’s all that matters. And, as soon as you go into deeds, you’re going into works that undermine the gospel. And, there are those who would say, hey, the people have heard it, we don’t need to preach. Let’s just do it, let’s just do good things, right?

I think, on one side, you have sort of sectarian, by that we mean, set apart from the culture, sectarian fundamentalism. And, on the other side, you have what would be more syncretist, becoming one with the culture, liberalism. It’s less about doctrine, doesn’t matter that much, it’s more about embodying this reality in the midst of the culture. Fundamentalism, on one hand, is about heavy conversion, right? And, we’re all about conversion and people coming to Christ and being born again. But, fundamentalism says it wants heavy conversion, because they want to go there, but it has little emphasis on meeting people’s needs regardless of what they believe. 

Because legalism does not produce compassion, but pride, that camp or that stream, or that ditch you can fall into, from there we end up saying, I’m good and that’s why God loves me, but those people out there, they’re not. Those people are evil. And, we see, in that, we’re missing the grace that’s been shown us as God’s people.

And then, on the other side, there’s syncretist liberalism. They meet all the needs they can, but there’s no call to repentance. There’s no call to coming to faith. And, I’ve talked with actually pastors that would fall more into that camp, and they’ve told me, yeah, we don’t call people to Jesus, we just let them respond however they see fit.

And so, you’ve got these two sides that we tend to lean towards, but here’s what happens. The true gospel, the fullness of the gospel, the whole gospel, produces people who don’t despise the world or reflect the world, but they are utterly different from the world. We, as God’s people, should be utterly different in that we are word and deed people. You cannot read the epistles and the book of James, and not arrive at that conclusion. We are word and deed people.. And so, we as a church are committed to that. We’re not going to debate that. We are about meeting physical needs in our community, and the surrounding communities, and we are about preaching the good news of the gospel, so that the need underneath the need can be met in Christ. We are about both of those things, and we’re not going to fudge on either one. 

That’s why I’m super thankful for Raymond Moorhouse here. If you guys haven’t met him yet, he’s the outreach chaplain here at Emmaus, and he does a lot of work among the population of Redlands with homelessness, and meeting physical needs. And, he thinks really well about it, too. If you haven’t had a conversation with him, I would encourage you to do it. But also, the helping humans workshops that he does, it fleshes that out for us biblically, because we often don’t know what to do in the physical realm, right? It’s either bleeding heart, give people a sack lunch, or on the other hand, it’s like … it’s too messy, they want to be there, we’re not going to do anything, we’re going to leave them alone. 

I think the gospel calls us to a third way. And so, we at Emmaus church are thinking through, praying through, getting input into how we flesh out for us, how we become a word and deed church, and continue to be a word and deed church. 

So, this being before doing produces word and deed … finally … which results in holistic healing.

III. …WHICH RESULTS IN HOLISTIC HEALING (vv40-45)

 Now, are you seeing the trajectory of your day? You begin with Abba Father, this is who I am, then as you go throughout your day, you’re going throughout it as word and deed people. And, ultimately, what we see, is by God’s grace, we’re joining God in his work, and it results in holistic healing. It results in a comprehensive salvation. 

Look at verses 40-42 … And a leper came to him, imploring him, and kneeling said to him, “If you will, you can make me clean.” Moved with pity, he stretched out his hand and touched him and said to him, “I will; be clean.” And immediately the leprosy left him, and he was made clean. Leprosy had all of life implications. Leprosy was not just a physical issue, it was physical, social, and spiritual. It meant that if you had leprosy, you were an outcast, you were a social pariah. It meant that you had to stay in a desolate place without touch, and it meant that if a leper came near to an inhabited place, what they would hear is cries of people crying out … unclean! Unclean! They couldn’t be touched. 

Imagine you, this afternoon, head over to Citrus Plaza, and as you’re walking through the food court, everyone starts crying out .... unclean! And, they part the way for you, and no one will touch you. Imagine the reality of that in life, everywhere you went. If someone who was not lepers came into contact with a leper, he or she was now unclean. In fact, there’s a rabinical writing of the time that says, if a leper stands under a tree and a clean person passes under the shadow of the tree, the clean is made unclean. And then, the person who passes under the shadow of the tree is now ceremonially unclean, and they have to go through a whole ritualistic ceremony to become clean again, so they can engage their community, and engage in worship. 

And, of course, for the leper, it meant no temple worship. They couldn’t enter the temple as unclean people. See, what’s going on here is not just physical healing, but a comprehensive, holistic salvation. And, you and I are that leper. You and I need comprehensive, holistic salvation, and when we place our faith in Jesus and we find the spirit of sonship that cries Abba, Father in us, from there we join God in his work to proclaim this good news, this holistic salvation in word and in deed. 

What may be lost on us, as well, as we read this text, is that the leper, here, has made a mad dash for life. The leper comes to Jesus in an inhabited place, it seems, and bows to Jesus, throws himself at the feet of Jesus. He breaks all the laws, all the societal norms that lepers were supposed to adhere to, and throws himself completely upon Jesus’ mercy. Notice he says … if you will … make me clean. If you will, make me clean. He doesn’t say, you have to make me clean, I’ve risked everything for you. Don’t you see what I’ve done? Don’t you see what I’ve risked to come into your presence in the midst of this inhabited place? I could be beaten, I could be killed for breaking all of these social taboos and laws. Here I am, at your feet, Jesus. Don’t you see what I’ve done? You have to heal me. 

Notice there’s none of that in the language. He says, if you will. This is not a conditional appeal based upon his own work. He doesn’t say, look what I’ve done, look how I’ve risked for you. He drops all his conditions, and he says, if you are the authority - as we looked at last week, the author of life - if that is you, I give up all my rights, and place my life at your mercy, and I do it gladly, and I do it willingly. 

See, if the leper were Greek or Roman, he would have said, if you will, you can make me well. But he doesn’t. He says, if you will, you can make me clean. Clean physically, clean to my community, clean before God. And, Jesus gives it to him. Verse 41 says he was … moved with pity … some versions say, moved with compassion. Now, this reality doesn’t happen if he is not living out of Abba, Father. Think about how inconvenient this is. And, how do we view people who have needs in our midst? In the midst of our busy days, are people simply an interruption? We can’t meet everyone’s need, that is true. But, we all have people that are right before us, in our spheres of work and our spheres of influence, in our neighborhoods. We have people right in front of us, that God says are placed there by him, Acts 17:26, are placed there by him to move towards God. 

We can’t do everything, but we are called to be moved for compassion for those who are right in front of us, all of us. But, if we’re not living out of Abba, Father it’s simply an interruption to what is fast and famous.  This is our call as God’s people. Our world, our community - and we know this ourselves - desperately needs holistic healing. See, this is why Jesus reaches out, and he touches him. Did you catch that? The untouchable is touched by the author of life. The untouched is touched. Did he have to do that to heal? No, we see that Jesus heals in many different ways. He can heal with a command, or he can heal with a thought at times. Jesus touches him, because his soul is starving for it, because he was made for God and deep community, and what he’s known is isolation and abandonment, and desolate places. Jesus is giving holistic salvation the leper needs, and that you and I need.

Finally, let’s look at the rest of the text, verses 43-45, to see clearly what’s happening … And Jesus sternly charged him and sent him away at once, and said to him, “See that you say nothing to anyone, but go, show yourself to the priest and offer for your cleansing what Moses commanded, for a proof to them.” But he went out and began to talk freely about it, and to spread the news, so that Jesus could no longer openly enter a town, but was out in desolate places, and people were coming to him from every quarter.” … Up to this point in history, whenever something unclean came in contact with something clean, what was clean was defiled. What was clean, was made unclean. But, here, Jesus tells the leper to go to the priest, so he can certify your healing and declare publicly what is now true of you, that you are clean. 

For the first time in history, the clean touches the unclean, and the unclean is made clean. The unclean is made well. And, by Jesus not going to the priest for ceremonial washing after touching the leper, he’s declaring, I am cleanliness. I am what cleanses the defiled. I am savior. No matter what you’ve done, or what’s been done to you, if you come to me, and I touch you, you will be made clean. That is the kingdom that Jesus ushered in, in his incarnation, and what we see lived out in his ministry. 

Now, Jesus tells the leper, don’t tell anyone what I did. But, the leper does exactly what Jesus says not to. He does the exact opposite. And, notice the result … the leper and Jesus have exchanged places. The leper who used to have to be in desolate places now goes into the city, and Jesus who was in the city among the inhabited, now goes into the desolate places, and this foreshadows for us how the uncleaner made clean. In Hebrews 13:12, we’re told that Jesus was crucified outside the gate. He was crucified in the desolate places, taken out of the place of the leper, he becomes unclean so that we can become forever clean, taken out to the place of the leper, he becomes unclean, so that we can become clean.

This foreshadows for us the ultimate work of the cross. See, and this is where this sort of transformational cycle happens, that at the foot of the cross, we receive the spirit of sonship that cries out Abba, Father. That reality leads us into word and deed living, where we join in God’s work to see holistic healing come, which brings us back, again, to the foot of the cross. This is kingdom living for the life of the believer.

Do you want this prayer, this communion with the Father, this word and deed life that the kingdom produces? Here, is where it begins, knowing that Jesus has substituted himself for you, and for me. See, when Peter tells Jesus, everyone is looking for you, this was far truer than he knew. One of the realities that we know as God’s people, is that whether people realize it or not, everyone is looking for him. And, this morning, we are invited, and every one of you here is invited to place your faith, whether it’s for the first time, or whether it’s to renew your faith and once again place your faith in the one who went to desolate places for you, so that we could be made clean. It begins there, again, and the Lord invites us to the foot of the cross. Let’s pray.

Jesus, 

We are grateful for this beautiful reality. Lord, we are people who are unclean in and of our own deeds. Lord, we ask this morning that your Spirit would awaken us to our desperate need for you. Lord, that we would once again live into the reality of the sonship we have, and that our spirits would cry out Abba, Father, as we come, once again, to the table and remember and live into, and receive the grace of the cross of Jesus Christ. Lord, would you make Emmaus church, a people who are rooted in Abba, Father, who live out the word and deed reality of the kingdom, so that we can see holistic salvation, complete salvation come to the Inland Empire. Lord, it is far more work than we can do, but at the end of the day it is not our work, it is yours. And Lord, we rest in that truth and all the complexity that is this world, and the work of seeing your kingdom come to bear in this world, Lord, may we never lose sight of the cross of Christ, and our good Father, our Abba, Father, as we go about our work. We ask this, Lord, in Jesus’ name, Amen.