Steward

Sharing our Riches in Christ-Full Sermon Transcript

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PASTOR: MATT DENNINGS

SCRIPTURE READING

“Yet it was kind of you to share my trouble. And you Philippians yourselves know that in the beginning of the gospel, when I left Macedonia, no church entered into partnership with me in giving and receiving, except you only. Even in Thessalonica you sent me help for my needs once and again. Not that I seek the gift, but I seek the fruit that increases to your credit. I have received full payment, and more. I am well supplied, having received from Epaphroditus the gifts you sent, a fragrant offering, a sacrifice acceptable and pleasing to God. And my God will supply every need of yours according to his riches in glory in Christ Jesus. To our God and Father be glory forever and ever. Amen. Greet every saint in Christ Jesus. The brothers who are with me greet you. All the saints greet you, especially those of Caesar’s household. The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with your spirit.”

—Philippians 4:14–23 ESV

INTRO

Well, I’m back again. Well, today we get to finish our series in Philippians, and what’s interesting as we hit this last section, it’s easy, sometimes, to read scripture and to go, oh, are these just kind of some historical factoids at the end of a book? Isn’t that nice. But, what we’re going to see, is that Paul actually ends this letter in the same way that he actually began the letter, with the theme of partnership in the gospel, specifically this idea of stewardship. Stewardship. It may be a word you’ve heard before, which means, essentially, how we use our time, talent, and treasure, to bless and glorify God, to bless others.

One of the things that I think will help, a story that I once heard that will help us get, kind of, the thrust of this text, as Paul is ending this letter to the Philippian church. It’s a story I once heard about a boy, and his grandma, and a few other family members. And, the boy and his grandma, they decided to play Monopoly as a family, which - pastorally - I never advise families to play Monopoly together. It always ends up with someone at 1 a.m. calling grandma a cheater, and calling grandpa a liar. But, anyways, as they played the game, the boy was intense. He was intense, and he was lapping everyone around the board, he was gobbling up all the properties that he could get. And, he was kind of haughty about it the entire time, kind of in everyone’s face. And, when he won, he was gloating over his stacks of cash and how well he had done, and the whole family just kind of trickled away. And, when they were done, the grandma leaned in, after the family had trickled away, and she said, now, listen closely, cause I want you to learn the real lesson of the game. The real lesson is this: that now everything goes back in the box. That now, everything goes back in the box.

The point she wanted him to grasp, is that Monopoly, in many ways, is like life in miniature. The game of life, if you want to call it that, is about more than how many times you can pass go. At the end of the day, it’s about more than what you can aquire. It’s about more than the stacks of cash. It’s about more than the property. Life is meant for something more. Life is meant for something that lies beyond the box. Because, one day, it will all go back in the box. We’ll go in a box. Sometimes I feel weird as a pastor, cause I have to, like, talk about these things. Like … by the way, you’re going to die one day. Everyone’s like, why do you have to talk about that? I’m like … facts are stubborn things. We will one day, it will all go back in the box.

And, the question that Paul is surfacing here, which is, did you invest your life in what is most important? Did you invest your life in the things that are beyond that box? What lies beyond it? And, today, we’ll see that the only goal in life that will satisfy you, is a life stewarded for the glory of Jesus Christ. So, let’s pray, and then we’ll jump in.

Heavenly Father, we thank you for this text this morning. Father, we so often think fleeting or small things of your Word, and especially of the endings and beginnings of these letters. But, Father, help us to see, today, that these are more than just historical facts, but these are truths, eternal truths that you have put in the hearts of your people, and that you are using to communicate your Word, your very being, what is true of us as human beings as your creatures, what it means to find life in you. We ask that, for each of us, you would give us wisdom in how to apply this text, and discernment, and where that is needed. And, Father, we ask that you would do this by your Spirit. It is in Jesus’ name that we pray, amen.

  1. WHAT IS STEWARDSHIP? (vv14-16)

What is stewardship? I want to take a little bit more time to get into this before we jump in. What’s interesting, is Paul - as I said - began his letter to the Philippians, calling then partners in the gospel. If you go to chapter 1, verses 3-5, right after the intro, he launches into the main body of his letter with this … I thank my God in all my remembrance of you, always in every prayer of mine, for you all, making my prayer with joy … why? … because of your partnership in the gospel, from the first day until now … They have constantly been partners with Paul in his ministry of the gospel. And, when we get to the end of the letter, Paul comes back to that theme. He says, then, in verse 14 … Yet, it was kind of you to share my trouble. And you Philippians yourselves know that in the beginning of the gospel, when I left macedonia, no church entered into partnership with me in giving and receiving, except you only.

So, Paul now ends with this theme of stewardship, with this theme of partnering. Now, what’s interesting, is that the word that is used there, is a word that, if you’ve been around churches and whatnot, you’ve probably heard this word before. It’s the Greek word koinonia. And, the Greek word koinonia means, like, a rich, by God’s spirit indwelling in his people, kind of fellowship, a fellowship that only happens by God’s spirit bringing people together. And, Paul uses that, both in verse 14 - this is what we can miss in the English translation - in verse 14, when he says … it was kind of you to share my trouble … that word share is a compound word of with, in koinonia. That, you’ve fellowshipped with me in my suffering. Then, he comes back to, you’ve koinonia’d again, in your partnership in the gospel with me.

So, what is Paul saying here? What Paul is saying, is that when you are stewarding your finances - cause Paul is here, largely, talking about them sending him finances as we’ll see throughout his ministry. As you are sending me finances, you are not just sitting on the bench somewhere as a passive observer in my ministry. That is, as you stewards the resources that God has given you - and we’re going to expand this into your time, your talent, your treasure. As you steward those things, you share with me in this ministry. You share in my trouble. You are a partner with me. There is not, kind of, I’m in the game, and you are on the bench, and you’re over there. No, what stewardship means is that God has gifted his entire body with a diversity of giftings, and everyone’s in the game, and everyone has a part to play. Everyone shares in this ministry.

Now, stewardship is the most powerful means that God uses. Cause, the question, I should just say … why does God have us steward our finances? Why does God have us steward our time? Why does God have us steward our talents, our giftings? Why does he have us invest them into these things of this world? You go, well, pastor, you just talked about how everything goes in a box one day, and it’s gone, or whatever. Why do we invest in these things? Why do we spend time? What does this mean?

Well, stewardship of our lives is the most powerful way to align our hearts with God’s eternal kingdom. In other words, stewardship is the way that God trains us to love the things he loves, to value the things he values, to prioritize the things that he prioritizes. He does it through stewardship. Emmaus put out a Lent devotional, and each week we’ve been looking at a discipline. And, of course, this week is stewardship. And, it says this to kind of sum it up …

“Stewardship is the voluntary and generous offering of God’s gifts of time, talents, and treasure for the benefit and love of God and others. In stewarding our possessions we recognize that nothing really belongs to us. Rather, everything we have we’ve received from our Heavenly Father’s hand for His use through us. As we steward our resources our grip on things loosens and our hearts are freed; our mindset is transformed from one of possession to one of participation in God’s work of redemption.”

—The Emmaus Lent Devotional Guide

Stewardship is more than how we merely use our time, our talent, our treasure. Stewardship is how we learn to invest our very lives in what matters, and what is eternal. Cause, if you think about it, what is time, but the way that we measure our days, our every breath, our every moment? What is it for? If you think about it, our talents reflect the image of God stamped on us, to make an eternal dent in the universe. Our treasure, our resources, and money, and possessions, is meant to point us to a greater, a truer, lasting source of riches. In other words, stewardship is how we learn to invest our whole selves in something bigger, more satisfying and longer lasting than that box.

So, what’s interesting, is Paul - as he goes through here - there are many places that you could go in scripture to look at this theme of stewardship. But, as Paul is talking about stewardship here, he lays down, kind of, some principles that are, kind of, assumed, as he’s going through and talking to the Philippians.

And so, the first principle - I almost wanted to call this Kingdom Economics 101. What are the principles of stewardship that Paul lays down here? And, the first one is this. Stewardship is about practicing generosity vs presuming generosity. Look at verse 14 … Yet it was kind of you to share in my trouble … Notice Paul says it was kind of you. Paul doesn’t say, yeah, you were supposed to do that, right? Yeah, it was your duty to do that. Paul said, it was a kindness that you do this. And, why is that? Because, Paul knows that, ultimately, he doesn’t have to beat around the Philippians with these expectations that are sourced in him, but he knows that, ultimately, everything that’s provided, is provided by God. He, Paul, and we … at the end of the day, we don’t deserve anything. But, we receive grace and mercy, and that doesn’t change with stewardship.

So, out of the gate, like Paul, we need to highlight that stewardship is an act of kindness. In other words, it’s not a paying of dues. It’s not as if God’s grace comes with an invoice, and now this is the way that you pay me back, this is the way that you keep yourself in the kingdom, by investing your time, your talent, and your treasure in this way. But, in fact, it is of generosity, it is of grace.

Now, the second principle is that stewardship is about partnering with people vs purchasing of products. If you read verse 15 … And you Philippians yourselves know that in the beginning of the gospel, when I left Macedonia, no church entered into partnership with in giving and receiving, except you only … Paul says that, what happens, is you partnered with me. There wasn’t this kind of idea that it’s like, when you partner with me, that you’re actually just getting some kind of a service, or a good, or a product. But, what he’s saying here is that God’s kingdom is about partnering with God and his people, not purchasing a product. Why? Because, the kingdom of God is about people, not about products. When we stewards our finances, it reminds us of that as we partner with one another in what God is doing, that God’s kingdom is about people.

The third principle in this first point … stewardship is about long term vs short term commitment. Verse 16, he says this … Even in Thessalonica you sent me help for my needs once and again. Now, if you go back to Philippi when it was actually planted - this church that Paul is writing to here - if you go back to Acts 16, you can read the account of when Paul actually planted that church. Then, if you continue on to Acts 17, you’ll read about how after he left Philippi, Paul went on to Thessalonica, and there he planted a church, and as he was there, it was actually - it seems to be - slow going. Imagine that, the book of Acts with a slow growing church. We always think that it’s, like, explosive growth in the book of Acts, but Paul was actually there for quite a while. And he says, while I was there, right after you became Christians, you had no working categories or anything, at this point you joined in with me, and for the long term you invested what God was doing there.

Now, why is that important with stewardship? Because, often, this is actually what genuine gospel transformation looks like. It looks like slow, long term growth. One of the things that i think we miss sometimes is how much in scripture, especially if you look at the parables of Jesus, how does he describe growth? How does he describe the expansion of the kingdom? He uses agrarian examples, right? It’s like fruit growing, it’s like the grass growing. And, whoever thought it was exciting to go out and go, I’m going to go out and watch the grass grow today, right? This is going to be really exciting. The fact, is that growth is slow, and it happens many times over long seasons, and of course, just like when we grow and we have these sudden, kind of overnight, like, your four year old suddenly goes through a new size of shoes of whatnot, and you have these explosive points of growth, overall those are kind of blips, and overall it’s just a slow trajectory of steady growth.

But, often, we lose the value in that. But, stewardship and committing stewarding over time, for the long term, helps us to hold on to that. Stewardship makes us think long term versus short term, cultivating in us a healthy patience and a trust that God is at work. So, what is stewardship? It’s the call to invest our whole lives towards something bigger than ourselves. Stewardship is about practicing generosity versus presuming generosity, partnering with people versus purchasing products, and it’s about long term versus short term commitment. So, that is what stewardship is. But what motivates, or why, do we steward?

II. THE MOTIVATION OF STEWARDSHIP (vv17-18)

The motivation of stewardship. Paul is very careful in how he phrases verse 17. Look at verse 17, it’s actually, at first, if you read it and you think about what does he mean here, it’s a little bit confusing on the surface … Not that I seek the gift, but I seek the fruit that increases to your credit … So, Paul says, I don’t seek the gift, I don’t seek these finances from you, but I’m seeking fruit that increases to your credit. Why does he say this? Well, in the ancient world, the way that gifts would work … we tend to think of gifts as something that’s more, kind of, altruistic, right? Like, I give you a gift, and there’s no strings attached. If there’s strings attached, it’s not really a gift, right?

Well, in the ancient world, that’s not how gifts worked. And so, what Paul’s saying, is right after saying that when you first became a believer, I gave you the gift of the gospel - in Acts 16 - then, in Acts 17, when I continued on, and you started financially giving to what I was doing, and from that day until now, you’ve been doing that. Paul says, I want you to understand that you’re not doing it because you have some obligation to repay my original gift to you. Because, he saying I give you a gift, you give me a gift, and I’ve got to give you a gift, and then … it just never ends, right? We know how that works. We know Christmas.

And so, here’s something that’s helpful …

“In antiquity it was taken for granted that gifts are accompanied by obligations and should elicit some form of return… they did not share the modern idealization of the unilateral gift, which has such a powerful hold on contemporary notions of ‘altruism’.”

—John Barclay, Paul & the Gift

So, again, today a gift is defined as no strings attached, but in that day, that wasn’t how a gift was defined. And so, if the cultural expectations were different in Paul’s day, he’s saying he doesn’t want their motivation to give financially to be because of an obligation to him. He doesn’t want it to be one of obligation. He doesn’t way to say I gave you a gift, and it’s only proper, you know, that you give me a gift of equal or greater in return, right? But, instead, he wants their financial giving to be a fruit of a life overflowing from their life in Christ. And so, this is the first principle under the motivation of stewardship. Stewardship is about overflowing fruitfulness vs obligatory gifts. Because, we receive righteousness, we don’t achieve it. We can never pay it back.

Think about that. If God said, here’s the gift of salvation. Now, when you get around to it, we’ll take out a 30 year mortgage and you can pay be back. That’s not how it works. There’s no way we could ever pay God back for the gift of salvation. And so, we are not under an obligation to pay it back. This is why, by the way, you may have wondered this. When we do our - it’s called a liturgy - the order of our service, when we get to our offering every week, we say something along the lines of … we give as an expression of our thankfulness for grace, rather than to purchase grace. You guys heard us say that a lot, and you probably hear some kind of a theme consistent with that, or similar to that, repeated every single week. And, you might be going, why do we say that every single week? And, we say it every single week because we want to, by the repetition, work that truth down into our hearts. Because, it is so hard when we live in a world of everything is … you scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours … and obligations to return things. We have a free gift of grace from God.

And, God says, you are under no obligation to return that, to repay that. And so, we have to again, and again, say that to ourselves so that it works down from our heads into our hearts. And, we have a free and a great salvation. That inner motivation takes a lifetime of repeated training, until eventually our hearts say … I don’t have to give, but I get to give. I don’t have to, but I get to. And, Paul continues in verse 18. What’s interesting in here, is he says, describing their offering, he describes it then, using language from Leviticus. So, read verse 18 … I have received full payment, and more. I am well supplied, having received from Epaphroditus the gifts you sent, a fragrant offering, a sacrifice acceptable and pleasing to God … Did you catch that? A fragrant offering? A sacrifice acceptable and pleasing to God?

Paul says he uses this Levitical language, language from the Old Testament law, when they would have to offer a sacrifice for their sins, and Paul says that, now though, instead of offering because you are under an obligation to deal and pay for your sins, instead, now, you are under the banner of grace, cause Jesus Christ has fulfilled that offering system, and that sacrificial system. And so, now you are offering to express the grace that you have received. And so, now you are offering to God. And so, the next principle. Stewardship is about pleasing God vs placating God. The Spirit of God has given us a desire to preach the gospel with our wallets, our schedule, our energy, our skills, and our talents. And, when we stewards our resources, we fan that into flame. And so, we spend our life offering the beautiful and unique offering that only we, with our giftings, can present to the God of the universe, and that preaches the gospel to our souls of how beautiful the grace is we’ve been given in Jesus. And, stewardship is a way to channel that light to God, and express that delight to God.

God has not rejected us, but has accepted us through the perfect offering of Jesus Christ. Seeing us in our sin and brokenness, God overflows with grace and love towards us, because that is who he is. And so, stewardship isn’t motivated by an overwhelming sense of guilt, but an overflow of grace. So, why steward? Because, it is an expression of the gospel, that God has fully paid the price of our redemption, and therefore we give not to placate God, but to please God.

So, we’ve covered what stewardship is and why we steward, but what happens when we stewards? What happens when we invest our lives in the things that God values?

III. THE RICHES OF STEWARDSHIP (vv19-23)

Lastly, the riches of stewardship. So, here’s the question for us. If we’re honest, I know that sometimes when we heard these things like stewardship, investing our finances, offering our finances, offering our time, offering our talents for the uses that God has called them to … I know that in church we’re just supposed to nod our heads and say amen, right? We’re supposed to go … yeah, yeah Pastor. But, why is it so hard to do it? Why is it so hard to actually begin doing it?

Well, it’s interesting because Paul goes right there. In verse 19, he says … And my God will supply every need of yours according to his riches in glory in Christ Jesus … See, Paul rushes right in and says, I need to address something that I know you’re assuming. If I give of my supply, then what supply will I have left? If I give of my money, what money will I have left? If I give of my time, what time will I have left? If I give of my talents, what talent, what time for my talents and investment will I have left?

One of the main reasons that we don’t steward, is that we fear that we are losing our riches. We fear that in stewarding our resources, that we are losing our riches. But, do you see what Paul says here? He says that it’s in stewarding that we actually gain and discover true riches, that we actually discover true riches. It’s like playing Monopoly, when everything is focused on the board. It’s easy to forget that everything will actually, at the end of the day, go back in the box. So, we go around and around, year after year, pursuing riches that will not last. Things that will not last. But stewardship, Paul says, frees us from false riches to discover true riches, to what lasts beyond the box.

Now, what are these true riches? I had to think about this for a while, because I could obviously say, well, and my God will supply you every need of yours according to his riches in glory in Christ Jesus. There you go, your riches are in glory, in Christ Jesus. You go, yeah, that sounds good, okay. But, tangibly, what does that mean? What does that tangibly look like? And, I had to think about this for actually quite a while, because I was looking at it going, what is Paul really talking about here?

And, I realized it goes back to how Paul began this section in chapter 4, this last section. And, it’s a them we see again, and again, in Paul’s letters. He says this in 4:1 … Therefore my brothers, whom I love and long for, my joy and crown, stand firm thus in the Lord, my beloved … So, Paul comes back and he says, the way that you know true riches … See, Paul, again and again, when he says I’m investing, I’m laying down my life, I’m pouring myself out as a sacrifice, all these different ways he explains it and describes it in all of his different letters. He never says I’ve done this so that then you’ll pay me. He never says I do this so that then maybe you will supply me with a nice little carriage or a car, you know, or that you will supply me with a house. He always says, again and again, my riches are you. My riches are that I get to be on the front lines of seeing you know Christ. You are my joy, you are my crown. Again and again, Paul highlights that. True riches, in other words, tangibly, is most found when we see others see Jesus. When we see others grow and know Christ.

Now, why is that? In some ways, it’s so simple it’s obvious. Because, the one thing that won’t perish is people. Eternal souls. Now, Jesus didn’t come for things, he came for people. Now i know theologically, you know, things are redeemed and the physical world is, like, you know, refined and everything. But, what I mean is, that, like, today at lunch I’m not concerned about the redemption of my sandwich, right? Like, Jesus didn’t come to save my sandwich. Jesus came to save eternal souls, he came to save people. True riches, then, are discovered when we invest our lives in the eternal life of others, in others seeing Christ for the first time. And, I think one of the things that I realized while doing this, is sometimes we forget how beautiful that is. Sometimes we forget how beautiful it is when we’re in someone’s life. You remember that first time when you first saw Christ for who he is. When you first realized the grace that you had been given. Have you ever been in someone’s life where you had a front row seat to see their eyes opened for the first time to seeing the beauty of Christ? It’s riches.

This hit me recently. I was actually at a presentation, and Larry Thomas - Larry’s here - he was doing a presentation on a ministry that they do internationally. It’s a medical mission, and one of the things that they do, is they do these cataract surgeries. And, what they have, is they go into these villages, and there are many individuals who have never really been able to see a day in their life. And, there’s a video that they showed of this one gal named Lalise. And, it starts the video where Lalise’s eyes are bandaged, and her whole life she’s been blind. And, it was a simple cataract surgery that actually allowed her to see, but she couldn’t get it. And, they captured it on video. At that time, she had a baby. She had never seen the baby. And, this captures the moment when she opened her eyes, and for the first time, she saw her child. The first time that she saw this child that she had never seen. And, in that moment, when I saw that, I said … that’s a picture. We forget so often how beautiful it is when we open our eyes for the first time, and we can see Christ for who he is. That look, that freedom, that removal of guilt that comes with that.

And, here’s the thing … when you see that, just like when I saw that, I wanted to be like, Larry … here’s my wallet. Take whatever you need, right? More of that. More of that. In the same way, that when we see others see Christ for the first time, we don’t anymore hoard, we aren’t sitting there with our stacks of cash on the board, and we’re not thinking about how many times we can go around the board. We just push it all to the center, and we say … take it. Take it, because I want to see more of this. I want to see eyes opened. And, what Paul is saying, is this is true riches. These are the faces that will be on the streets of the new Jerusalem. The grace cannot hold it. And, Paul says, your life can be given to this. The effect of living as a people, as a church, as people who steward everything, who say there is something beyond this world that is worth my all, verses in this world. It’s something that stands out.

In fact, you see it here in verse 22. Paul closes by saying … All the saints greet you, especially … Paul wants to highlight this. Paul is in a Roman prison, in the palace of Caesar, at the most decadent, established, powerful city in the world, and he says, by the way … especially those … who are in … Caesar’s household. He’s seeing people come to Christ while he’s starving in prison, while he’s in chains, he’s in tatters … but, what they see, is they see this partnership going back and forth, and they see that him and the people who he’s speaking to, they have something that’s worth more than anything in this world can provide. And, their eyes are opened.

If you read, there’s a letter about 70 years after this letter that Paul wrote to the Philippians. Another letter is written to the church at Philippi. It’s by an early church father about 120 AD named Polycarp. And, Polycarp writes them a letter, and in the letter he goes on and on in the first chapter, where he says … again, this is 70 years later, where he says, you’ve been known for your sacrificial giving, since the beginning, since Acts 16, what Paul’s talking about here. He says, you’re known for overflowing with this joy in Christ, and that’s still here, today. Do you see what happened? Their children in the church in Philippi saw this in their parent’s lives. The community saw this in their lives, and they saw that this isn’t just a game. Jesus isn’t just for Sundays. He’s more than a weekend thing. His kingdom is coming, and it’s worth everything we have, and we are all in.

And so, they saw that one generation after another generation after another generation, and their legacy was not whatever went in the box. Their legacy was something that could not be extinguished by the grave. But, by eyes that were opened. Can you imagine, Emmaus, if it’s 70 years from now? Imagine this, 70 years from now, if you were able to come here, maybe some of you who are in this room who right now are babbling, will still be alive and be in this room. But, most of us will be gone. Can you imagine coming in here and you see that all that has happened is that there is still just a love for Jesus? A love for Jesus, because they say, what I learned here is that the most valuable thing I can give my time, my talent, and my treasure to, is something that lies beyond this world. It preaches the gospel.

It says that Jesus is everything. And, it starts with how we steward our time, our talent, and our treasure today. One of the things, obviously as I’m talking about this, I always feel weird talking about stewardship, because obviously at some point it’s like … okay, as the pastor, when is he going to ask me to volunteer for something, right? And, I want you to be able to invest your time, talent, and treasure here confidently, I do. I want you to be able to invest your time, talent, and treasure here as well as everywhere else where the Lord has placed you with influence. One of the things, though, is when we do it in the local church, is that we learn to do it. And, what happens is we actually take steps that commit us to doing it, and then as we commit to it, we start to do it in all other areas of our life as well. It’s almost like if you don’t do it at home, you probably aren’t actually doing it elsewhere. There’s probably a lot of talking, not a lot of doing.

And so, one of the things that I want to say, is that Emmaus, this is why again, and again, we come back to that Emmaus is about more than just building some kind of a platform. Emmaus is about more than just one person, or persona. If there’s one persona, it’s Jesus. One of the things we ask ourselves again, and again, and again as elders, as the three of us pastors, we’re asking ourselves this. If 100 years from now Emmaus is still here, who gets the applause? Is it Jesus, or one of us? Who gets the applaus? Who’s this really for, what is this really about? And, we constantly challenge ourselves.

In fact, one of the mottos I’ve tried to grab onto, lately, is from a guy named Count Zinzendorf. I don’t know if I want to steal more his motto, or his name. But, it’s this … he says …

“Preach Christ. Die. Be forgotten.”

—Count Nikolaus Ludwig, Reichsgraf von Zinzendorf (1700-1760)

Preach Christ. Die. Be forgotten. Don’t you love that name? Count Nikolaus Ludwig, Reichsgraf von Zinzendorf. It can be my new title. But, think of it … preach Christ. Steward Christ. Give yourself to Christ. I know I used to think … and then be forgotten? Like, die and be forgotten? What does that mean? Well, it’s all going to be lost anyways. In fact, if you want to have a legacy and something that lasts, I mean, I think about, like, when baseball’s gone, the legacy of Babe Ruth is gone. There are countless rulers who were mighty, who had a legacy and a country, and when that country was gone, their legacy was gone. Your legacy can only be as big as what it is in, and if your legacy is in Jesus Christ, it never diminishes. And so, invest your life in Jesus. Invest your life in what he is doing. Invest your life in souls.

But, for that to happen, for Emmaus to remain a church that is about Jesus and Jesus alone, one of the things that we have to all put our arms around and understand, is it means everyone has to lean in with their giftings. Everyone has to lean in with their time, everyone has to lean in with their resources. We all have to lean in. One of the things in 1 Peter, I should have had it here … but, 1 Peter that we come to again and again with the volunteers on Sunday mornings, is that it says that some of you are gifted with hospitality, some of you serve in other ways, some of you speak, some of you pray, some of you heal, some of you … all of these giftings, Peter says, and he says if that’s happening, if that’s happening in the local church, what will happen is it will bring glory to Jesus Christ.

Why is that? Because we know to … we’re alive in 2019, just watch a couple TED talks and you can figure out how to put something together and make it work. But, it is a supernatural grace and a movement of God when his people, with all these diverse gifts, all these different people who have no reason to be together, come together with all the parts working in unison, and you say, there must be something else there that motivates it. Something beyond the box, something beyond this world. Or else, it just has to be done in the flesh, and then continued in the flesh.

One day everything will go back in the box. What riches will remain? What will remain? Each of us is called and equipped for this time. Don’t miss out on true riches. What gifts has God given you by his spirit? What time has God given you to invest in others? What resources has he given you to be invested? So that we would see eyes opened to what lies beyond the box.

I have to read the words of Jesus. He says …

““Do not lay up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust destroy and where thieves break in and steal, but lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust destroys and where thieves do not break in and steal.”

—Matthew 6:19–20 ESV

Emmaus, don’t live for the box. Steward the riches you have in Jesus Christ, sharing them with others, and find a richer life in him. Let’s pray.

Lord God, we thank you for the riches we have in Christ. Father, open our eyes to where we are living not just for the box. Spirit, grant us wisdom, each individually, for what this means for us, and motivate our hearts to action, not through an oppressive guilt, but through an overflow of gospel grace. We ask this in Jesus’ name, amen.