Pastor Vinnie Hanke

A New Way of Relating-Full Sermon Transcript

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JULY 7, 2019 // MARK 2:13 - 3:6 // A NEW WAY OF RELATING

PASTOR: VINNIE HANKE

SCRIPTURE READING

“He went out again beside the sea, and all the crowd was coming to him, and he was teaching them. And as he passed by, he saw Levi the son of Alphaeus sitting at the tax booth, and he said to him, “Follow me.” And he rose and followed him. And as he reclined at table in his house, many tax collectors and sinners were reclining with Jesus and his disciples, for there were many who followed him. And the scribes of the Pharisees, when they saw that he was eating with sinners and tax collectors, said to his disciples, “Why does he eat with tax collectors and sinners?” And when Jesus heard it, he said to them, “Those who are well have no need of a physician, but those who are sick. I came not to call the righteous, but sinners.” Now John’s disciples and the Pharisees were fasting. And people came and said to him, “Why do John’s disciples and the disciples of the Pharisees fast, but your disciples do not fast?” And Jesus said to them, “Can the wedding guests fast while the bridegroom is with them? As long as they have the bridegroom with them, they cannot fast. The days will come when the bridegroom is taken away from them, and then they will fast in that day. No one sews a piece of unshrunk cloth on an old garment. If he does, the patch tears away from it, the new from the old, and a worse tear is made. And no one puts new wine into old wineskins. If he does, the wine will burst the skins—and the wine is destroyed, and so are the skins. But new wine is for fresh wineskins.” One Sabbath he was going through the grainfields, and as they made their way, his disciples began to pluck heads of grain. And the Pharisees were saying to him, “Look, why are they doing what is not lawful on the Sabbath?” And he said to them, “Have you never read what David did, when he was in need and was hungry, he and those who were with him: how he entered the house of God, in the time of Abiathar the high priest, and ate the bread of the Presence, which it is not lawful for any but the priests to eat, and also gave it to those who were with him?” And he said to them, “The Sabbath was made for man, not man for the Sabbath. So the Son of Man is lord even of the Sabbath.” Again he entered the synagogue, and a man was there with a withered hand. And they watched Jesus, to see whether he would heal him on the Sabbath, so that they might accuse him. And he said to the man with the withered hand, “Come here.” And he said to them, “Is it lawful on the Sabbath to do good or to do harm, to save life or to kill?” But they were silent. And he looked around at them with anger, grieved at their hardness of heart, and said to the man, “Stretch out your hand.” He stretched it out, and his hand was restored. The Pharisees went out and immediately held counsel with the Herodians against him, how to destroy him.”

—Mark 2:13–3:6 ESV

INTRO

Good morning, church. As Forrest said, my name’s Vinnie Hanke. It’s a great pleasure to be with you this morning. It’s been an odd week, hasn’t it? We’ve had fireworks, earthquakes, Kawhi Leonard signed with the Clippers, it’s odd. But, ultimately, today is about Jesus, no matter what has gone on Monday through Saturday, amen? If this is your first time in church, or first time in a long time, we want you to relax, just take a deep breath. We don’t want anything from you today, but we do want something for you. We want you to know the peace and love that comes from acknowledging Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior. Amen, church?

We also want you to be sure that we believe two things about you today. Number one, we believe that if this is your first time here, or your first time in a long time, that you’re not here by accident. But, we believe in a sovereign God who is in control and desires to meet with you today, and he has chosen this place, and this time, and this passage, and these people all on purpose, in order that he might meet you right where you are.

As we make our way into the gospel of Mark today, something I always like to do whenever I preach in a new place or in a new book, for me, is kind of set the content and the context of where we’re at. So, real quickly, the content of the gospel of Mark. This is one of the three synoptic gospels. It’s partnered with Matthew and Luke, and they serve to teach and tell about the life, ministry, death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus Christ as Savior. Each one has its own personality, they’re own points of emphasis, and yet all are equally inspired by God. Mark seeks to answer the question, who is Jesus? In fact, this question will become the central theme of the entire gospel. Who is Jesus of Nazareth, and what is the good news that is the gospel about him? That’s our content. 

Readers in Mark will see Jesus’ entrance into his ministry, his selection of the 12 disciples in chapters 1-3, they’re follow Jesus as he teaches and travels in chapters 4-8, they’ll watch as Jesus suffers, and sacrifices in chapters 9-15, and then they will ultimately rejoice as Jesus is resurrected and raised in glory in chapter 16.

Our context today is Mark chapter 2 verse 13 through chapter 3 verse 6, which we just heard read for us. Mark will provide a recounting of Jesus’ calling of Levi, continue to turn up the heat on Jesus’ confrontation with the Pharisees. Here’s my main idea. If you like to take notes inside your Mark journal or on your phone inside your fake Bible, Jesus has created a new way of relating to God that is free from religious try-hardism, and entirely built on his grace towards sinners. That’s where we’re headed today. WiIl you pray with me?

Father God, 

I thank you for this morning. I thank you for the people, God, and the purpose of Emmaus Church, to bring you glory, and to make disciples, and to love their community. I thank you, Father, and am humbled that you would allow me to open your Word with them. I pray, God, that you would forgive me of my sins, God, anything in the places where I’ve grown weak and weary, and you would allow me to deliver your Word carefully and clearly to your people God, that are here. God, we pray these things that by your Spirit, you would teach us what we know not, you would give to us what we have not, and you would form in our character what we are not. And, God, we ask these things at this time, ultimately, for your glory. We keep none for ourselves, and we ask this through Christ our Savior, amen. 

I. JESUS CALLS LEVI (vv2:13-2:14)

Amen, let’s begin. Beginning in Chapter 2, verse 13 … He went out again beside the sea, and all the crowd was coming to him, and he was teaching them. And as he passed by, he saw Levi the son of Alphaeus sitting at the tax booth, and he said to him, “Follow me.” And he rose and followed him …  If you were here last week, you know that Pastor Forrest delivered a message on Jesus’ ability to create a deeper healing, a soul healing and meet our greatest need. As we watch Jesus not only heal a paralytic man at the behest of his friends, but also forgive his sins. From there, Jesus continues his teaching and ministry, he again is going to press up against the sea as the crowds around Jesus are ultimately attracted to him. This is a guy who is teaching with authority, who is performing not only supernatural work, but is carrying with him an influence in his community. 

And, as he makes his way along with the crowd out toward the sea, he encounters a man sitting in a tax booth named Levi. And, Jesus looks at Levi and says two simple words … follow me. And, Levi responds with two simple actions … he gets up, and follows him. One of the things that’s interesting here, is Mark leaves out the content of what Jesus was teaching right now. He’s going to begin a section intended to describe the conflict between Jesus and the religious leaders of the day. As Jesus and the crowd are making their way out to the sea, he calls Levi the tax collector.

Now, we might miss this if we’re not first century Jews. Any first century Jews in here? Okay, I didn’t think so. What Jesus has just done is a social and religious taboo here, inviting a tax collector to become a disciple, to follow him. Tax collectors, in general, are not popular folk. No love songs are written about tax collectors. Now, a jewish tax collector working for Rome, an occupying nation, were extremely unpopular. Think about this. Think about this, if the nation of Canada invaded the United States. I know, it’s far fetched, but let’s just say our Canadian brothers and sisters decide that they’re going to invade our country. They ultimately overthrow the government, take over everything, and then they set up local tax houses, and then some of your fellow American citizens go to work at those tax houses. They would not be very popular folk, would they?

That’s who Levi is. He’s a Jewish man, working for the occupying nation of Rome. The tax collectors became equally, if not more, despised than the Romans. They were dishonest, they often used intimidation and even force, and had regular context with Gentiles. All of this would have made them ceremonially unclean according to Jewish religious law. Think of having a bad case of the religious cooties. Remember the cooties, right? Whereby contact with someone who had cooties then transferred the cooties to you? That’s, essentially, the ceremonial unclean law of the first century Jewish temple. Who knew second graders were such religious zealots? 

Jesus continues to break cultural and social bounds by inviting Levi to being a part of his company of disciples. Like Peter, Andrew, James, and John as we saw in chapter 1, Levi responded to the call by leaving his secular work and following Jesus, becoming a disciple. Tradition tells us that Levi will be renamed as the disciple Matthew. Levi follows Jesus, there is an immediacy to the response of Jesus’ call. And, no doubt, this is not just an external call, but Jesus was doing something in Levi’s soul in that moment, when he invited him to come and belong. This might beg us to investigate our own soul this morning and say, what might we need to leave behind to follow where Jesus calls? Is there a level of comfort, security, or identity that we continue to cling to despite Jesus’ ongoing call to follow him where he would lead?

II. JESUS SHARES A MEAL WITH SINNERS (vv. 2:15-2:17)

Verse 15 … And as he reclined at table in his house, many tax collectors and sinners were reclining with Jesus and his disciples, for there were many who followed him … So, what we do, is we shift from Jesus teaching along the seaside, calling Levi to now, probably later in the afternoon and evening, Jesus and his disciples and many from the crowd have made their way back to Levi’s house. If you’ll excuse me, I have a Bible nerd moment. The word disciple, here, in verse 15, appears … [AUDIO BREAK] … in Mark. It’s an indication of how important discipleship is in the gospel of Mark. The word disciple simply means to be a learner. But, the disciples of Jesus were meant to be more than just students. They were devoted not just to his teaching, but even more so to him as a person. Jesus intended them to become ministers to the needs of others.

As we examine this scene in Levi’s house, the doctor Luke, from his gospel, will tell us this little bit of information in Like 5:29 when he says … Levi made him [Jesus] a great feast in his house, and there as a large company of tax collectors and others reclining at table with him … Jesus calls Levi to become a disciple, and Levi immediately responds by following Jesus, and then having a party in which he invites friends over, so they too can meet Jesus. The love of Jesus, for all kinds of sinners, his initiative in going and seeking them out, giving them full acceptance, and his desire to have a close relationship with them, was a new and revolutionary element in religious and moral standards of his day. Jesus was turning outcasts into insiders. 

If this morning you feel, or have felt like an outcast, you are welcome here. For, you are in a room full of outcasts, that Jesus has welcomed in. Levi’s life is impacted by Jesus to such a degree that he immediately wants to see others impacted. 

I’ll give you a little math equation this morning. I didn’t create this, I’ve stolen it like every good pastor, but it reads this way … a gospeled life, plus relational proximity, times gospel clarity, equals missional impact. I’m ready for a seminary thesis. Let me break it down, here’s what I mean. What do I mean by a gospel life? A life transformed and changed by Jesus. If there are things that were true about you before Jesus that are no longer true, your life has been changed. If there were things that were untrue about your life before Jesus that are now true, your life has been changed. As you live that changed and transformed life out in the world amongst your family, and friends, and coworkers, and community, that’s relational proximity, the people around you. If you will be clear, that is, if you will use your words to describe why your life is different because of Jesus, you will see missional impact. That is, you will see more disciples made.

That’s what Levi’s doing here. His life has been changed and transformed by Jesus. All of a sudden, he’s left with this outcast position, and become an insider with Jesus and his disciples. And so, he immediately goes to those who he is relationally proximally close with, his friends, his neighbors, his fellow tax collectors, sinners, the fellow outcasts, and he says, hey, you’ve got to meet this guy. You’ve got to hear him teach, you’ve got to hear him talk bout … you’ve got to just be in his presence. So, I’m going to smoke a big pork butt, and we’re going to all get together, and we’re going to have a feast together. It probably wasn’t pork butt, because he’s a first century Jew. See? When you leave your notes, you just get into trouble. We’re going to have Jewish barbeque, and we’re going to have a good time, is what Levi said to his friends, and you’ve got to meet Jesus. And then, they’re going to be clear, Jesus is going to be clear about his message and mission with them, and that’s going to result in more disciples made. 

The same is true for us, living in Southern California in 2019. If we will live lives that have been transformed by Jesus, if we will remain in relational proximity for those who do not know Jeus, and we will be clear about why our lives are different and changed, we will see God use that to reach more people

Verse 16 …  And the scribes of the Pharisees, when they saw that he was eating with sinners and tax collectors, said to his disciples, “Why does he eat with tax collectors and sinners?”  … This and the following two sections are going to deal with what Pharisees consider a religious deficiency in the eating habits of Jesus and his disciples. They are unsatisfied with his religious eating habits. How religious do you have to be to be concerned about the eating habits of another human being? The scribes and the Pharisees will quickly become today’s version of a social media troll. They will constantly search over Jesus’ timeline to point out mistakes, cast judgements, and ignite displeasure among the people over Jesus. Jesus and the early church were often criticized for associating with undesirable characters, and Mark is going to justify Jesus’ practice by showing how the changed lives of the people glorify God. 

By the way, this is the typical response of the religious to the grace and mercy of Jesus. They begin to cast stones. They don’t celebrate and join in at those who are outcast becoming insiders, no, they begin to throw stones. Why would you associate with that person? People are getting to know Jesus and hearing the truth, and the religious are only worried about what kind of people are in the room with Jesus. You see, the scribes and Pharisees prided themselves on living a life of complete religious obligations. Through their lens of interpretation, the law of Moses from the Old Testament contained 613 commandments, 248 positive actions, things they had to do, and 365 negative actions, things they were not to do. These laws were worn like a great, big merit badge by the Pharisees. There were laws for who, for how to, and from whom you could purchase food, and with whom it was safe to eat. 

Now, what’s the big deal with sharing a meal? Why would they become frustrated or curious why Jesus would do such a thing? Well, one of the reasons is the way that people ate might be different from the way you and I might eat today. You and I head into McDonalds, we both order our meals, we each get a separate tray, we sit down, you’ve got your food, I’ve got my food. Never the twain shall meet, unless you’re close to someone, and even then you’ve got to ask permission, right? You can’t just go be stealing fries, it’s just bad form. But, in Jesus’ day, everything was served family style, which meant if Jesus and his friends were going to go to McDonalds - again, probably not McDonalds because he’s a first century Jewish rabbi - but if they were going to sit at McDonalds, they don’t get a just 10 mcnugget box, they get a whole plate full of mcnuggets that they’re all going to share, and they don’t get a little individual sauce packet, they get a whole bowl of hot mustard sauce together, which means every time I’m going to eat, I’m going to take a chicken nugget from the communal bowl, and I’m going to dip it into the communal sauce bowl, which means my food is going to touch your food, our hands are going to be in the same bowl together. And, for the religious leaders, they could not abide by that, because if you were unclean and my mcnugget touched your mcnugget, now I would be unclean. 

So, they have an objection that Jesus would sit with such people, and potentially become ceremonially unclean. See, I like to call Mark the action movie gospel. Doubtless, if you’ve read through the first two chapters, you’ve seen the word immediately several times. Mark wants to use a swiftness of movement and action, and what he’s doing right now, is he’s slowly beginning to turn up the pressure cooker between Jesus and the Pharisees. And, right now at the beginning of our passage together, the concern with how Jesus is eating it, by the end of our passage together, they’re going to be ready to kill him. 

Verse 17 … And when Jesus heard it, he said to them, “Those who are well have no need of a physician, but those who are sick. I came not to call the righteous, but sinners.” … Jesus responds to the question of the Pharisees, and his response is simple, it is beautiful, and it is devastating. Jesus is with those who are willing to acknowledge their need. Because, here’s the reality. What we know from the rest of the teaching of scripture, is that ultimately no one is righteous, but rather all are sinners in need of the grace and salvation and the call of Jesus. And, perhaps this is the greatest hurdle that we face in our coming to Jesus, is to understand our sinfulness in front of the eyes of a holy God. See, the gospel continues to save us as we are continuing to acknowledge our need for grace. 

Coming to the realization that you are sick, that you are broken, that you are a sinner, is not a one time thing where you said a prayer at a Sunday school 30 years ago, and now you’re good. It is a daily recognizing our need for Jesus. That, God, apart from your sin and mercy, I am broken and lost. That apart from your intervention through your son, Jesus Christ, I’m lost. I’m separated. There is no hope. When you come back daily to that need, you are immediately aware, once again, every morning of what the scripture tells us that God’s mercies are made knew every day. And, that’s what Jesus is getting at here that he has come not to call the righteous, for they have no need. But, to call the sinner, in the same way the doctor doesn’t spend a whole lot of time with not sick people, the gospel will continue to save us as we are continuing to acknowledge our need for grace. 

The structure of the next section as we continue to make our way, Mark’s going to do three things. He’s going to set the scene for us, he’s going to tell us what’s going on, there’s going to be an accusation or a question lobbed at Jesus, and then Jesus is going to respond. 

III. PHARISEES ACCUSE JESUS & JESUS RESPONDS (vv2:18-2:24)

Verse 18 … Now John’s disciples and the Pharisees were fasting. And people came and said to him, “Why do John’s disciples and the disciples of the Pharisees fast, but your disciples do not fast?” … Essentially, Jesus, why aren’t you following the religious tradition that everybody else is doing? Well, why aren’t you continuing in the pattern that is socially and culturally acceptable? 

Verse 19 …  And Jesus said to them, “Can the wedding guests fast while the bridegroom is with them? As long as they have the bridegroom with them, they cannot fast. The days will come when the bridegroom is taken away from them, and then they will fast in that day. No one sews a piece of unshrunk cloth on an old garment. If he does, the patch tears away from it, the new from the old, and a worse tear is made. And no one puts new wine into old wineskins. If he does, the wine will burst the skins—and the wine is destroyed, and so are the skins. But new wine is for fresh wineskins.” … Jesus really has a way of making clear things muddy, doesn’t he? So the scene is set. John’s disciples and the Pharisee’s disciples, and the Pharisees themselves are all fasting. The question is made, hey Jesus, why aren’t you doing that thing? Why aren’t you and your disciples fasting? That is, why aren’t you refraining from food for a period of time, out of religious devotion?

Jesus answers the question of the people using three illustrations. A wedding guest on a diet, a bad seamstress, and a lazy bartender. The first illustration is a wedding guest on a diet. It would be odd and out of place, wouldn’t it? I mean, a wedding is a time of celebration. If you go to a good wedding, there’s going to be a good meal there. I’m talking about that rubbery chicken, I’m talking about steak or something hearty. And, it would be out of place at a moment of celebration for you to suddenly decide, you know what? I’m going to go on a diet, and I’m fine with these little mints on the table. No, you would partake in the celebration and in the meal. It would be an insult to the guests, and to the celebration around you, to refrain from enjoying the feast. As Jesus answers the people, it would be odd for my disciples to fast at this time for I am among them, celebration is now. As we’ve heard Pastor Forrest talk about last week, the kingdom of God is at hand. There will be a day - Jesus alludes to his death here - there will be a day when it will be appropriate for them to fast, when I depart from them. It’s a small illusion to what’s coming next. 

Jesus continues, he talks about a bad seamstress, someone who takes an unshrunk piece of cloth and tries to sew it on an old piece of cloth, that way it would lead to a greater tear. Again, something out of place. It doesn’t fit. And then, finally the lazy bartender who would put new wine into old wineskins, ultimately creating them to burst. What Jesus is alluding to here with each one of these, is that the kingdom of God is something new, that Jesus is doing a new thing, that he is bringing the reality and the revelation of what everything from before him has meant, and it’s to try to fit Jesus and the kingdom of God into the religious conception of what the Jewish Pharisees and religious leaders have made it out to be, would not fit. Essentially, the old religious structure will not hold the kingdom of God. It’s too big, it’s too great, it’s too magnificent, and it’s too beautiful. 

The legalism of religious obligation will not stand in the kingdom, rather it will be relational obedience. The way to God is not through religious practices, but through joyful faith and association with Jesus. The way to God that Jesus is creating is not through religious practices. The old way that the Pharisees related to God, by obedience to a law that they interpreted and created for themselves, would not be the way to God, but rather through joyful faith and association with Jesus. And, what was true of Jesus in the first century is true of today. Going to church will not get you to eternity. Writing a check will not get you to eternity. Conducting a Bible study will not get you to eternity. It is only through joyful faith and association with the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ, that will get you to eternity. 

Verse 23 … One Sabbath he was going through the grainfields, and as they made their way, his disciples began to pluck heads of grain … So, think about this. You’re walking through a field of grain, and as the disciples are walking along, they’re just plucking a few heads of grain, okay? Just kind of walking along, same as if you were going on a hike and you saw some berries and you knew they were safe to eat, you might pluck a few, plop them in your mouth, and continue on your journey. 

Verse 24 … And the Pharisees were saying to him, “Look, why are they doing what is not lawful on the Sabbath?” And he said to them, “Have you never read what David did, when he was in need and was hungry, he and those who were with him: how he entered the house of God, in the time of Abiathar the high priest, and ate the bread of the Presence, which it is not lawful for any but the priests to eat, and also gave it to those who were with him?” And he said to them, “The Sabbath was made for man, not man for the Sabbath. So the Son of Man is lord even of the Sabbath.” … The last two sections of the five conflicts that Mark will describe for us, deal with the observance of the Sabbath. The scene is set. It’s the Sabbath day, and Jesus and the disciples are walking. An accusation is levied against the disciples, that they are actually working on the Sabbath. So, again, you’ve got to hear the ridiculousness and the accusation. These are men who are just walking through a field, plucking heads of grain, and the Pharisees accuse them of actually reaping, harvesting. In answer, Jesus recalls a time when David breaks ceremonial religious law to meet the needs of the men who were with him. Jesus closes with a statement that the Sabbath was made for man, and not man for the sabbath. We also hear Jesus’ statement that he, himself, is Lord even of the Sabbath. 

See, the religious leaders had taken the Sabbath and created a burden instead of a blessing. They had taken this thing that God had set aside for man to rest, and enjoy God, and creation, and rest from his work, and they turn it into a religious burden that these men, these people of their day, were to obey. So you’d become so freaked out that you didn’t want to violate Sabbath law, that you ended up doing nothing. It wasn’t a sense of freedom and joy around the Sabbath in this time, but a sense of religious obligation. And, what we see Jesus do here in his answer, he gives us this great truth, that Jesus set forth a basic principle, that human need should take precedence over ceremonial and religious laws. Alluding to the time, again, when David and his men invade the temple and eat the ceremonial bread which would have been reserved for priests, breaking all ceremonial and religious law.

This, too, begs the question, I might ask, where do we do this? Where might we be taking the blessing of God and making it a burden to others? Where might we be taking the get-to’s that God gives us, and making them have-to’s? That’s what the Pharisees and the scribes had done, here, with the sabbath. They turned that which was meant as a gift to man, and flipped it upside down, and created it as a religious obligation that man must serve. The Sabbath was designed by God in order to serve man, not the other way around.

IV. JESUS HEALS, AND THE PHARISEES PLOT TO KILL (vv3:1-3:6)

Our final section, Mark chapter 3, verses 1-6 … Again he entered the synagogue … This was his natural, regular pattern to teach and preach among the synagogues and the towns that he traveled to … and a man was there with a withered hand. And they watched Jesus, to see whether he would heal him on the Sabbath, so that they might accuse him … You could see just in the few short verses, probably within a short amount of time, the Pharisees go from asking questions about Jesus’ behavior, hey why would he eat with such people? To, now just living with an attitude and a spirit of bitterness and accusation. They’re watching Jesus as he’s in the synagogue worshiping, and they’re watching the man with the withered hand, and they’re just waiting to call foul. They’re just waiting to lob an accusation. Is Jesus going to do something good? Is he going to heal that man? Is he going to change that person’s life forever? How dare he, is the heart of the Pharisee. 

Verse 3 … and he said to the man with the withered hand, “Come here.” And he said to them … In this description in chapter 3, Mark flips the scenario. He sets the scene, Jesus is in the synagogue, there’s a man with the withered hand, but rather than the accusation or question coming at Jesus from others, now Jesus is going to lob his own question. 

Verse 4 … And he said to them, “Is it lawful on the Sabbath to do good or to do harm, to save life or to kill?”  It would seem like a simple answer, shouldn’t it? Like, of course we would say, the Sabbath, we must do good on the Sabbath, of course we should save a life on the Sabbath. But, the Pharisees had created such laws and such an entanglement of what morality and goodness look like on the Sabbath, the people might not even be sure what Jesus’ answer was. The Pharisees respond with simple silence at the end of verse 4. 

Verse 5 … And he looked around at them with anger, grieved at their hardness of heart … I like the New English Bible version of this, Mark 3:5 … And Jesus, looking around at them with anger and sorrow at their obstinate stupidity … The Pharisee’s religious try-hardism had created not people who honored the holy God, but obstinate, stupid people who thought they could behave their way their into the good graces of God. And, I might submit to you today, this morning, church, that if you are stuck in religious try-hardism, that this is one of your two fates.

See, religious try-hardism, that is, when I create a list of do’s and don’t’s for my life that i think will earn me God’s favor, I am setting myself up for one of two ends. The first end is obstinate stupidity. That is, I will become so prideful, because I will begin to list my religious achievements, that I will begin to think that God owes me, that he’s lucky to have me, that I’m so special and so benefit my local church and so benefit the kingdom of God, because I am so righteous, because look at all the things that I’ve done. Look at the money I’ve given, look at the services I’ve attended, look at the mission trips I’ve gone on. I don’t know what’s on your religious to-do list, you fill in the blank. But, whatever it is you try to do to get God to like you, that’s religious try-hardism. And, one of the fates of that is this obstinate stupidity in which you become a prideful creature, thinking that the creator owes you something. And, if that is not your fate, the other one might be worse. Because, you will realize very soon that you can’t keep the list, that you can’t get it done. And so, what are you left with? Only to recognize that your own efforts could never get God to love you, to like you, so you are left with this broken guilt and shame, often abandoning faith altogether, because you realize you’re not worthy, because you couldn’t even obey your own rules. 

This is the fate of the Pharisee lifestyle - obstinate religious stupidity and pride, or a crushing weight of guilt and shame because you’ll never be good enough. But, what Jesus does is he gives us an entirely new way of relating to God. 

Verse 5 … and he looked around at them with anger, grieved at their hardness of heart, and said to the man, “Stretch out your hand.” He stretched it out, and his hand was restored. The Pharisees went out and immediately held counsel with the Herodians … the Herodians from history are those Jews who were in favor of the Roman installed Jewish government, the political party. The Pharisees hold counsel with the Herodians against Jesus, and plotting ... how to destroy him … which begs the question, exactly what Sabbath law does that one honor? See, the Pharisees are faced with a choice now. Either Jesus is who he says he is, is he the Lord of the Sabbath, able to forgive sins, and produce supernatural healing, and if so they must leave their carefully religiously choreographed lives and follow him or worship him, or they have to get rid of him, cause he’s a threat. He’s a threat to the established order. He’s a threat to their religious choreographed life. 

And so, they being obstinate, stupid religious people, decide that they cannot have Jesus in the kingdom of God, because he will not fit their image, he will not fit their pattern, he will not fit their way. And so, they begin to plot with the Herodians, a political party they would normally have nothing to do with, but they become enemies of Jesus and begin a plot to kill him.

So, I would beg of you today, would you examine in your soul what are you are clinging to and allowing to get in the way between yourself and Jesus? For the Pharisees, it was their choreographed religious life, it was their religious try-hardism. They couldn’t get it out of the way, they couldn’t leave it. And so, what we end with here in this section, is Levi, a man who left the tax booth to follow Jesus immedaitely and wholeheartedly, and the Pharisees who leave Jesus and plot to murder him.

To be a disciple of Jesus this morning, you must believe two things, and do one thing. The first thing you must believe, is like the paralytic last week, and even Levi this week, we cannot work our way into the good graces of God. That, you cannot save yourself. That, you must admit that Jesus said that you are sick, spiritually, and that there is no cure. The second thing you must believe, is that Jesus is the good doctor, the physician who comes to heal and to provide hope, that he has the power and the ability to do that which you cannot do, and through his life, death, and resurrection, has made atonement for your sin, and would call you now to be his very own, and provide healing where you need it. If this morning you are ready to believe these two things, than the final thing you must do, the Bible describes it in a variety of different ways, but in each moment it is clear it is an indication, and we must choose to follow Jesus. It would be my greatest hope and earnest prayer that every soul in this room would believe these two things, and do this one thing, that you would follow Jesus. Let’s pray. 

Father God, 

I thank you for your Word this morning. God, i just admittedly and openly confess that there are places where I have allowed religious try-hardism to creep into my soul, and ask that you would forgive me for the places I’ve grown religiously prideful, and that I’ve allowed guilt and shame to create in me an overwhelming sense of sorrow. God, would you free me and free us from this room, from religious try-hardism. When we come back to your grace, when we admit our need that we are unable to do it, but we trust that you can. Father, thank you for the pastors, and elders, and deacons, for the staff, for the congregation, Father, for those serving in children’s ministry, to those who work behind the scenes to make this place a place that preaches the gospel. I pray that you be glorified by the efforts today, that you would continue to bless the community and mission of Emmaus Church, and that you would use it to glorify yourself. We thank you, Father, and ask that you would receive our worship now, through Christ our Savior, amen.