Max Sternjacob

The Amazing Offensiveness of Jesus

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PASTOR: MAX STERNJACOB

SCRIPTURE READING

Jesus Rejected at Nazareth

6 He went away from there and came to his hometown, and his disciples followed him.2 And on the Sabbath he began to teach in the synagogue, and many who heard him were astonished, saying, “Where did this man get these things? What is the wisdom given to him? How are such mighty works done by his hands? 3 Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mary and brother of James and Joses and Judas and Simon? And are not his sisters here with us?” And they took offense at him. 4 And Jesus said to them, “A prophet is not without honor, except in his hometown and among his relatives and in his own household.” 5 And he could do no mighty work there, except that he laid his hands on a few sick people and healed them. 6 And he marveled because of their unbelief.

And he went about among the villages teaching.

Jesus Sends Out the Twelve Apostles

7 And he called the twelve and began to send them out two by two, and gave them authority over the unclean spirits. 8 He charged them to take nothing for their journey except a staff—no bread, no bag, no money in their belts— 9 but to wear sandals and not put on two tunics.[a]10 And he said to them, “Whenever you enter a house, stay there until you depart from there.11 And if any place will not receive you and they will not listen to you, when you leave, shake off the dust that is on your feet as a testimony against them.” 12 So they went out and proclaimed that people should repent. 13 And they cast out many demons and anointed with oil many who were sick and healed them.


—Mark 6:1-13 ESV

INTRO

Good morning, Emmaus. My name is Max, I am one of the pastors, here, for discipleship and care, and that is something that I love doing. I get to spend a lot of time thinking about what it means for people to actually come to Jesus and also grow in their knowledge of Jesus, and their maturity in Christ. And, today, we’re going to be jumping right back into Mark as we’ve been doing. And, Mark 6 is going to tell us something about Jesus that I think every disciple needs to know, and that is that Jesus is both amazing, and offensive, and that’s okay, because he gets to send the agenda here. 

So, before we jump in, as I was reflecting on this passage, I thought this is the second time Jesus has come to his hometown, at least as recorded in the book of Mark, and now there is this tension that has been ever increasing in the book of Mark, and now there is this awkwardness. And, I was trying to think of the kind of awkwardness that exists here, as Jesus comes into his hometown, and this is the best that I could come up with. How many of you have been to a class reunion? It’s fun, right? See, if you’ve had the pleasure of having a class reunion, and you’ve had the pleasure of going, it’s an interesting dynamic, because you returned back to where you used to be after years have passed, and you take with you an assumption about the people you are going to meet, because when you had left, you had a picture in your mind of what they were like, right? And, now you come back and you’re all thrown in a room together, and you meet, you know, Joe Smith, who is now a neurosurgeon. And, you go … really? Because, we think that the person that they were is the person they will always be, and we can’t fathom them ever actually changing. And, if you’re like me, I went to a reunion, and I tell them … I’m a pastor. And, they say the same thing. They’re like … really? It’s hard for them to get that in their mind because of who I was. They think … that’s not how I remember you.

The difference between, maybe, our experience with class reunions, and this experience with Jesus, is that we know that at least with Jesus, he’s not something radically different than he was. He came back to his hometown, and his integrity, and his character was the same as it was when he was younger. And, we get little glimpses her and there in the other parts of the gospels, that even his own parents, and his siblings, and the religious leaders, even when Jesus was a young man, were astonished or amazed by him, or perplexed by him. And yet, when he comes back to his hometown now, in the height of his ministry, they’re still having that same kind of reunion awkwardness. 

So, we’re going to cover three things today. We’re going to see that Jesus is amazing, and we need to be amazed by him, we’re going to see that Jesus is also offensive, and that we need to be offended by him, and we’re going to learn that it is not good to be amazing to Jesus. If we’re going to be successful in that, we need to pray and ask God for his help, so would you pray with me?

Father,

We thank you for son, Jesus. We thank you for the way that you have orchestrated history, and the author to record for us the amazing person, who he was, and would you help us by your Spirit not to just leave here intrigued, but leave here submitted to your son, Jesus. Would you help me to do that, would you help everything that comes out of my mouth this morning, point us and direct us to, ultimately, submitting to your son. In Jesus’ good name, amen. 

I. WE NEED TO BE AMAZED BY JESUS

So, you need to be amazed by Jesus. If I was to just walk up to you and ask you, hey, do you think Jesus is amazing? Do you think Jesus is someone worth looking at? Most of us, you’re probably here on Sunday because you think, yeah, he’s worth our time, he’s worth carving out an hour and a half on a Sunday to learn a little bit about him, that’s why you’re here. But, let’s just be reminded, at least in the author of Mark, perspective is that we have good reason, up to this point in chapter 6, to be amazed by Jesus, because we have seen and recounted for us all the things that Jesus has said and done. And, I just want to give you a preview of that, but let’s just be reminded. 

I’m using the word amaze, but if you’re following along with us in the ESV, it says this, chapter 6 in Mark, verse 1 … He went away from there and came to his hometown, and his disciples followed him.2 And on the Sabbath he began to teach in the synagogue, and many who heard him were astonished … they were astonished, they were amazed … saying, “Where did this man get these things? What is the wisdom given to him? How are such mighty works done by his hands? 3 Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mary and brother of James and Joses and Judas and Simon? And are not his sisters here with us?” And they took offense at him …

See, up until this point in Mark, we’ve already been shown, I’m just going to give you a quick summary here, that Jesus is amazing. And, how is he amazing? Well, right in chapter 1, Peter’s mother-in-law was healed by Jesus. And then, there right after that, many more in Capernaum, where Peter was from, were healed. And then, in Mark 1 at the end, it says that a leper was healed, and then a paralized man, the man that was lowered through the ceiling in Mark chapter 2. And then, right after that, a man with a deformed hand is healed by Jesus, and then we’re told that many more were healed by Jesus, and then the storm. Jesus calms the storm. The disciples are out on a boat, and this amazing hurricane comes up, and Jesus with a word stops it. And then, right after that storm, they land, and they are met by a demonized man, and he is healed by Jesus. And then, last week we, we saw that the woman who had bled for 12 years is healed by Jesus, and Jairus’s daughter, who was dead, is raised to life again, by Jesus.

So, when we get to this point in Mark, there is no question that Jesus is amazing. And, if you think about all of this that’s happening in a small community, in a small place, that the rumors that must have been spreading around Jesus, it indicates to us - which we’re going to find next week - is that there’s thousands of people who are literally going from place to place, trying to track Jesus down. And, next week we’re going to see that where Jesus feeds the 5,000, that there’s probably somewhere in the realm of 10 or 12,000 people who are held around Jesus, because they want to see him, get a glimpse of him, see more of these kinds of miracles that are happening. 

But, when he comes to his hometown, he’s met with questions. And, I think there’s five questions here, listed for us in chapter 6, and underneath those questions, it reveals some assumptions. And, I thought it would be helpful for us to kind of just unpack these questions real quick, to see, even though Jesus is amazing, the questions that come at him seem to be questioning whether or not Jesus really is amazing, whether or not the rumors that people have heard are congruent with the questions that they’re asking. So, let’s just dive into these questions. You see them there in verse 1-3. 

The first question, what is it? Where did this man get these things? See, behind that question, is a couple of things. One is, you have the cultural assumption that there was favored lines, families, positions, and offices operating in that ancient Greece world. That, if you were going to be special, you had to come from a special place, that you had to have the right office, the right family, the right position, the right influence. So, this question of, where did this man get these things, the question is getting underneath and saying, this man shouldn’t have these things. And, we know that because he’s in his hometown in Nazareth, and we know that that city was never mentioned anywhere in the Old Testament, it wasn’t mentioned anywhere in the Talmud, anywhere. It was a no-name city. It was the sticks, basically. It was a small town, maybe three or four hundred people. In fact, in John’s gospel, we hear from Nathaniel the view of that day about Nazareth was, he says, does anything good come out of Nazareth? It was kind of a running joke, right? That, Nazareth was no good for anything. 

So, there’s this assumption, they go, we know about ourselves, what our city’s like, and you have these things? Well, what things? And, if you catch that, they say, where did this man get these things, not … what are these things this man has? They are focused on the origin, not the content. They are not spending their time in their questions, asking, is what Jesus saying true, they’re asking the question, where did he get it from? Because, the assumption is, is that he must not have gotten it from himself. He had to have gotten it from somewhere else, right? They’re focused on the origin, not the content. 

So, what’s the next question? What is the wisdom given to him? See, we’ve already heard in Mark that the religious leaders and the people were astonished by Jesus’ teaching and authority. They said that they asked themselves, where does this man get this authority? And, even in the previous section with calming of the hurricane, the storm, the disciples say, what kind of human being is this, that he has authority over nature, over the winds the waves. Where does he get his authority from? Where does he get this wisdom from? Well, we’ve already seen that in his parables, even, that Jesus speaks, and he teaches, and people are just perplexed by his wisdom. And, the way that he deals with the religious leaders who are trying to goad him, or who are trying to catch him, who are trying to trap him. He speaks in such a way that he just slips right out of their traps, slips right through their assumptions. He comes to the religious leaders, and talks about forgiveness, and talks about authority in a way that they have no response. 

And, the other thing I want you to see, just culturally speaking, is that wisdom, at that time and place, was associated with divine blessing. So, for them, to see this kind of wisdom is a special anointing by God. Think King Solomon, right? Think that when God came to David’s son, Solomon, he says, I want to bless you. What do you want? And, Solomon says, I want wisdom. And, that divine wisdom is seen as a blessing and an anointing from God. So, they’re asking this question, how does he has this wisdom? He’s a nobody from Nazareth, and yet he has wisdom. And, wisdom, we know, comes from God. So, is God really with him? What’s going on with this guy? He doesn’t deserve to have this wisdom, he doesn’t have the credentials for it. 

And then, the third question, how are these miracles being performed by his hand? Right? He’s a carpenter! There’s an irony here, that he’s a man who works with his hands, and they’re saying, he’s not just a worker with his hands, he’s a miracle worker with his hands. How is he doing this? Well, we’ve already seen in Mark that the religious leaders, at least, are saying that the way that he’s able to do these miracles is not from God’s power, not God’s anointing, but Satan’s power. Underneath this, they’re saying, this person, the only logical conclusion to a person of this credentials, of this background, of this pedigree, is that he’s doing miracles because Satan is at work within him. They can’t even fathom the category that God might actually be using this no-name person from a no-name city to do these things. And, notice one thing, too, that they do not question the veracity of the miracles. They don’t say the miracles didn’t happen, they question the fact that this man does them by another power other than God. 

And then, the next question … isn’t this the carpenter, the son of Mary, the brother of James, Joseph, Judas, and Simon? Again, we’ve already talked, he was a carpenter. This is not a prestigious job. It’s better translated, a laborer. He was just someone who worked with his hands, he was a day laborer. He was the kind of guy you would just hire, like a handyman for the day. He’s not a rabbi. See, he’s not trafficking in the circles that the religious leaders trafficked in. Even though he shows up to his hometown and he’s got disciples in tow like a rabbi would, even though he comes with authority and a deep knowledge of the scriptures, and performing miracles, he’s not seen as a rabbi. They’re saying, he’s just a carpenter. He’s just a laborer. He’s not a rabbi like you or me.

And then, they say, maybe perhaps the most scandalous thing, is that he says, is this not the son of Mary? Now, for us, it doesn’t strike us immediately when we hear, he’s the son of Mary. Of course he’s the son of Mary, we know that. But, in that culture, to say that you were the son of your mom … when everyone else was always referred to as the son of your father. Why would they say that? They said that, because they knew who his mother was, but there was question about who his father was, right? They’re saying, is this not the illegitimate son of Mary? Yu would never refer to someone as the son of the mother. You always referred to them as the on of the father. It should be Jesus barr Joseph, right? Son of Joseph. I mean, it’s kind of a backhanded slap. And, we know there’s some implications there, because other places in the gospel, say John chapter 8, Jesus is running up against religious leaders again, and the accusation they make against Jesus, they say, we know who our father is! Right? That’s what they say to Jesus. We know who our father is, implying what? You don’t. And, Jesus comes back and says, if you knew who my father was, you would submit to me, you would follow me, because my father … is Yahweh. And, they go to kill him over that. 

And then, the last question, are not his sisters with us? I think it just kind of is a capstone on kind of everything that’s here. It might be a little bit of a reach, but I was thinking about it, and the idea that in that culture, as a woman, you would be married off, right? And, you would go be a part of another man’s family. And so, the fact that Jesus’ sisters are still with us, in their hometown with his family still, means that them, as a family, are not prestigious enough for their daughters to be desirable. There was no benefit for them. Because, marriages, then, were alliances between family. So, I think it’s not too far of a stretch to say that the fact that his sisters are still with his other family members, probably means that they have not been married. And, why wouldn’t they be married in that culture, where marriage was one of the highest institutions? It was because the family of Jesus had nothing to offer. They had no money. There was no benefit to align with that family, to share resources or to build out. Their sisters had been ignored. 

And, underneath all of these questions, is the assumption that the people of Nazareth knew who Jesus was, and more than that, they assumed that they knew how God was going to bring in his kingdom. They knew, in their minds, what the messiah would be like. It had a certain flavor, it had a certain shape, and it would come from a certain place, and it would look a certain way. And, Jesus, you do not fit any of it. His hometown did not deny any of the works and the teachings of Jesus, they don’t deny it, but they cannot bring themselves to change their beliefs or assumptions. See, Nazareth, as I’ve already said, is a small town. It’s probably, honestly, if you include our children, it’s probably about the size of Emmaus. So, you can imagine that out of a town that size, the rumors about Jesus … everyone knew who Jesus was, at some point. The rumors would start to spread quickly. And, just like a family reunion or a class reunion when someone comes back and has a position or a story about what’s taken place over those last 10, 15, 20 years of their life, if you’re like me, we hear it, and we go … yeah … prove it? Right? 

See, and the context here, is not just a conflict with his hometown. It’s not just a conflict with his family. It’s a conflict with the religious leaders, and we’ve already heard earlier on in Mark that the Herodians and the Pharisees who would represent both, kind of, the left and the right, the conservative, and the liberal sides of the religious leaders, both wanted him dead. They didn’t get along about anything. They hated each other, yet both the Herodians and the Pharisees agreed on one thing, and that was that Jesus had to go. So, how can these people be amazed by Jesus, yet still hate him? 

II. WE NEED TO BE OFFENDED BY JESUS

See, we need to be amazed by Jesus, but being amazed by Jesus, being astonished by Jesus, being intrigued by Jesus, being willing to sit down and read Jesus’ new book, is not enough for us. It’s not enough to just be amazed by Jesus. I would say that you have to actually be offended by Jesus. Look at Mark 6, we’re going to read it again, starting at the end of verse 3 … And they took offense at him. 4 And Jesus said to them, “A prophet is not without honor, except in his hometown and among his relatives and in his own household.” 5 And he could do no mighty work there, except that he laid his hands on a few sick people and healed them. 6 And he marveled because of their unbelief.

And he went about among the villages teaching … See, both the left and the right, his hometown, his family, they all were offended. They could not bear the claims of Jesus, because to them, Jesus was nothing more than an illegitimate bastard child. So, for him to come saying that the kingdom of God is near, the kingdom of God is at hand, I am the king of the kingdom, I am the messiah, they could not handle it. They were scandalized by it. That word offense, is scandal. It’s a scandal, and they took offense. 

Now, I think it’s important, here, to stop for a second and say, they took offense … does that mean that as followers of Jesus, we should be offensive? Well, I think it’s important to make a distinction, here, between taking offense, verses giving offense, alright? Let’s just stop for a second. It says … they took offense. There is a difference between someone who wants to be offended, who will find a reason to be offended, versus someone who is speaking truth, and using tact. There is a difference between someone who wants to take offense, versus someone purposefully making it hard for someone to hear. And, Jesus does not do that. We’ve seen Jesus’ miracles, and why we should be amazed by Jesus. But, if you go back and you read those accounts over and over again, people are astonished with the compassion of Jesus, with the wisdom of Jesus. He does not go after people and just rile them up for no reason. He does not goad them, he does not shame them. He speaks the truth with grace. And, the testimony, here, is that they hated him. They were offended by him, yet they all want to be around him. 

See, that should be the mark for us. We should not measure, as Christians, as followers of Jesus … our measure of success is not, do we offend people, how much we offend people. That’s not the measure of success. We should not go about our lives and say, well, I offended a lot of people today, I’m doing Jesus’ work. We should approach and come to our measure of success and saying, do I love people the way Jesus loved them? Do I have compassion like Jesus did? Do people not like what we say, but still want to be around us? That’s a good measurement. Do people know where we stand and know what we will say, and know what we will preach, but yet still want to be around us? Still can’t pull themselves away from us? That’s our measurement, is it not? 

 

See, Jesus did not give offense, but people took offense. And, we’re in good company, because Jesus said in John 15, that if the world hates you, know that they hated me first. They took offense, and they could not see that Jesus as actually giving and offering them exactly what they needed. Jesus did not go with the intention of pushing people away, or stirring them to anger. He had tact, he had wisdom, but yet Jesus is constantly evoking this reaction from the people. All of his teaching is met with hostility and offense, and if we claim to be his followers, to some extent, we will also receive that. We cannot control whether people will actually take offense, but we do not have the luxury of changing the message to make it less offensive. 

 

So, why did they take offense? What is it about Jesus’ message, about his gospel, that causes offense? See, I think that the questions that were just laid out there in Mark, indicate that the reason why they were taking offense, is that Jesus is just too ordinary. He’s too ordinary. It’s his ordinariness that trips them up. We know him. We know what the kingdom is supposed to be like. We know what the messiah is supposed to be like. You don’t fit. You’re too ordinary. See, we are in need of a kingdom that’s not out there, but that is a kingdom come near. And, that’s exactly what Jesus’ message is. He’s going around and telling people, the kingdom of God is at hand. The kingdom of God is near, because what we need is not a kingdom out there, we need a kingdom that comes into our ordinariness, to our ordinary life. 

 

We need God to interject into our normal life. And, I think it’s the ordinariness of Jesus that trips those people up, and I think it does it in two ways. I think it’s the goal of salvation, and the cost of salvation that trips people up. I think it’s the ordinariness of Jesus in the goal of salvation - basically, like, the trajectory of salvation that he’s talking about, and the cost of salvation, the freeness of it. Let me tell you what I mean, here. I think it’s the goal, because, again, we often think that when we think about God making things right in the world, it means that the world needs to end, and we need to go there to escape, to make God’s plans come about, to make things right, we need to leave. But, the whole Bible and all of the new testament, and all of Jesus’ teachings, is that we don’t need to go there, God needs to come here. The Bible starts, saying that he will restore the earth, not remove it. He will redeem it.

 

The new heavens and the new earth are coming. The Bible starts with a garden, where God is close with his people, and walks with them, and it ends with a city that comes out from heaven, and makes its place with man on earth. It is not us going to God, it is God coming to us, and that does not land well with the people who hear Jesus teach. And, here’s the thing. If we need to be offended by Jesus, we need to be offended for the right reason. See, if Jesus is real, and if he is actually God incarnate, in the flesh, come from outside of our world, to our world, who actually lived, who actually taught, who actually died, then every single place, every single culture, every single association, mindset, nation, and person will - at some point - be offended by Jesus. Because, he is from outside. He’s coming to the inside, to the ordinary,  and he’s coming, saying, what you have needs to change. What you have, needs to be redeemed. What you have needs to be restored. So, if that’s who he is, if that’s his mission, than every single one of us is going to be offended by Jesus, at some point. 

 

See, for some cultures, Jesus teaching on family is radical. And, to others, its shameful. Right? We’ve already heard in Mark 3, who is my mother?  Who are my brothers? They come to Jesus, and they said, your mother and your brothers are outside! And, he says … who is my mother, who is my brother? It’s the one who does the will of God, that’s my mother, that’s my brother. See, in that culture, to turn your back on your family was shameful. We’ve heard in Mark 2, when Jesus talks about forgiveness with the paralyzed man, to most of those hearers, it was unthinkable to say that this man is going around, granting forgiveness to people. That’s not how you give forgiveness. That’s not what forgiveness is. And then, in other cultures, Jesus teaching on money … it cuts right to your heart. Later on in Mark 12, Jesus has the account of the widow and her penny, you remember? The two mites? And, he says, the woman who gave the little bit, gave way more than the man who gave all. And, in some cultures, that talk, that speech, that teaching of Jesus about money, it doesn’t land well with us. It offends us.

 

See, at every point, Jesus is going to offend us. And, let me stop and I want you to hear this. If you get nothing else this morning, I want you to hear this, that being a disciple of Jesus is about being uncomfortable. It’s about allowing Jesus to offend us. It’s allowing him to command us. The difference between being a disciple of Jesus, and simply a bystander, is that we stick around to obey him. Think about it. You’ve probably all seen it, a man on the corner who’s maybe a little bit, couple screws loose. He’s holding a sign, saying the end is near, you need to repent. Have you seen that ever? What’s the difference between him and Jesus? Their message is the same. The difference between a disciple of Jesus and just being a bystander, is that when we hear Jesus say the same thing, we say, he’s talking about us.  He’s talking about me. See, we can ignore the crazy guy on the corner who has the same message of Jesus, because we do the same thing the people in Nazareth did. They were like, I know what that guy’s about. I’ve seen him before. He doesn’t fit the type of person, he doesn’t have the credentials that I’ll listen to. 

 

We need to stop and realize that when we say that we’re a disciple of Jesus, to be a Christian means that we allow Jesus to offend us, but we don’t run away. See, Jesus says he’s the king, and if he is the king, that means that he has authority. And, if he has authority, it means that we have to surrender. We have to let him say, and do the things that offend us to our core. See, Jesus says that that sense of comfort that you seek with your possessions, you need to find me your ultimate rest. That lust you hide from your friends and your family, you need to see me as beautiful. That anger that you have towards your brother, you need to forgive like I forgive you. That nagging lack of forgiveness that you harbor, it’s because you feel superior, but I am the only righteous one. That hopeless fear of the future, I know the end from the beginning. That secret cutting corners at work, I am the true servant who came to redeem you. That abuse that you suffered from someone who should have protected you, I am the good shepherd who lays down his life for his sheep. The manipulation of the numbers in your finances, I will give you all the resources that you need. The power and the control that you crave, I am your savior king. You cannot add one day to your life by worrying. And, the prominence and the influence that you desire, know that all of the scriptures, and all of creation, point to my goodness, and my preeminence. See, if Jesus is those things, he will offend you.

 

All of these things are offensive, they all strike us deeply. We want to ignore them, we want to justify ourselves, we want to run away. But, the grace of God, the Holy Spirit says, no, I’m going to plant you at the feet of Jesus, and you will listen. And, maybe you’re like me, and you’re like, I don’t know how to obey. Help me. Distil your grace in me, I need it. It reminds me of Lucy in the Chronicles of Narnia, when she first hears about Aslan, right? Do you remember the question she asks? Is Aslan safe? And, what does Mr. Beaver say? No he’s not safe. He’s not safe at all! But, he’s good. See, that’s the posture of a Christian. We don’t expect that when we become a Christian, that all of a sudden everything that Jesus says, somehow we agree with. When we become a Christian, we are set on a trajectory of the ordinary, where Jesus comes and he speaks truth up unto the ordinary places of our life, and points out where we are incongruent with his kingdom. 

 

And, that’s why we gather every week, right? We gather every week, because we believe that it is the ordinary means of grace. That is what we’re talking about, the ordinary means of grace, preaching the word, receiving communion, baptism, all three of those things are constantly pointing us to the ordinariness of Jesus, and how he brings about his gospel into life, and the lives of his people. They all point to it. We preach the word, because in them, we find life. We receive the table, because we say our only hope is to receive from Jesus, not bring something to Jesus, and we do baptism because we say it symbolizes that we are completely dead, and we have been made alive. We have nothing to offer. It is only by his grace that we are made alive, and that’s the ordinary means that Jesus uses, week in, and week out, to shape his people. 

 

So, what does he send his disciples out to do? He sends them out to preach the gospel … nope, actually it doesn’t say that. What does it say that they did? He sent them out to do what? To preach repentance. See, if Jesus is actually the king, then he goes out and sends his people out to preach repentance, which is basically saying, you need to repent in the areas where Jesus is not your king. You’re not living like Jesus is king. You need to turn. That’s what repentance is.

 

See, the second way that Jesus offends us is not just in the trajectory of salvation, the second way is the cost of salvation, and the freeness of it, the grace of it. See, Jesus’ gospel is so counterintuitive to us, because we know somewhere deep in our souls, that we believe that we need to escape this world in order for it to be saved. That, in order for us to be saved, we need to leave it. It’s too far gone. But, Jesus says, no. I’m coming to you, and my kingdom is coming near, and it’s here, and the world will be renewed, you will be renewed, and even if we can catch a glimpse of that reality, if you’re like me, my first reaction is … okay, it’s coming here … what do I need to do? The cost must be too large. There must be something significant I need to do for a salvation that’s fitting of that magnitude. But, Jesus says no, it’s grace. It’s not your work, it’s mine. It’s free. 

 

You know, just this week I was sitting with my youngest son, Elliot, in his bed. We just changed his bed, he’s not sleeping in a crib anymore, now he’s sleeping underneath a bunk bed, so he’s kind of adjusting to that, so we’ve been needing to kind of lay down with him to get him to get used to that. And, we’ve been listening to the Jesus Storybook Bible on CD, it’s great. I highly recommend it. But, it’s interesting because I was laying there with him, listening, and as with most children’s Bibles, they don’t go through the entire Bible. It’s one of the liabilities of children’s Bibles. But, the Jesus Storybook Bible hones in on one story that just struck me this week, that was kind of fitting this topic. It’s the story of Naman. And, why Sally Lloyd-Jones, the author of the Jesus Storybook Bible, decided to include that in the storybook, I don’t know. I would love to find out why she decided to include it. Because, it captures this ordinariness of salvation really well. 

 

If you don’t know the story of Naman, I’ll just try to summarize it for you. Naman, you can find this in 2 Kings 5, Naman is a Syrian Gentile general, and Elisha, one of the prophets of God, has been doing miracles, and preaching and proclaiming repentance to God’s people. And, these stories of miracles, much like Jesus, kind of come through the ear of Naman, and hears that Elisha can do mighty works, but Naman has leprosy, and in that day, leprosy was basically incurable, and he has it, apparently, pretty bad. And, Naman comes to Elisha and he’s met with - not Elisha - but with Elisha’s servant. And, Elisha’s servant says, Elisha’s not going to see you today, but Elisha knew that you were coming because Yahweh had talked to him and told him you were coming, and he’s telling you to go wash in the Jordan river. And, Naman is furious. And, I was listening to that story, again, and it reminded me … why was Naman so furious? Naman was mad about this, because Elisha didn’t come out to meet him. He thought, I’m a big, important guy, and I’m an important general. The least he could do is meet me in person, and now you’re telling me that the thing I have to do is just go wash in the Jordan river? I came expecting to pay you for this miracle, and now you’re telling me I’ve just got to go wash? It offended Naman, because he assumed that something was required of him, in order to receive salvation, in order to receive wholeness. But, Elisha is telling him … no. It’s faith, it’s trust. 

 

See, Naman had an expectation, that because he was important because he was a man of means, because he had status, that he needed to leverage that in order to get God to notice him. And, God says, no. That’s not what’s going to do it. Think about the story from just last week, the woman who was bleeding and Jairus. Jairus was a prominent man, this woman was a nobody, an outcast. And, what does Jesus do? He stops and gives his attention to the woman at the expense of Jairus, right? He sees people on the outside, and he gives attention to people on the outside and the prestigious the same, because it is not based on their excellence or their actions, it’s based on his compassion. See, Jesus offends us, but it’s exactly what we need. And, this is why Jesus sends people out to call them to repentance, because the irony here, is that the people who should have known Jesus the best, his hometown, failed to respond to him, even though they are amazed. And, what we see here is that Jesus is actually amazed by them. 

 

III. IT IS NOT GOOD TO BE AMAZING TO JESUS

It says that he’s astonished by their lack of trust. So, that’s the third thing, is we do not want to be amazing to Jesus. See, how is it possible for someone who knew Jesus that way, who would know him more intimately because they saw him grow up, and had heard of his miracles, and even saw him themselves, yet reject him. It comes down, I think, to the fact that these people had Jesus in their presence, but just as if being amazed is not enough, presence is not enough. And, it’s not just about proximity. It’s about our posture. See, Jesus, here, is known by these people, and it’s that very fact that he’s known that keeps them far from him. It is not the closest in proximity to Jesus, it’s about the posture of our hearts. 

And, I would say that - to play with this passage just a little bit - that Jesus being amazed by their lack of unbelief, is not something that we should aim for. Just like we should not aim to just offend people, to use that as the measure of our success, our fruitfulness, we should probably not use whether or not we’re an amazing church, as a measure of whether or not we are doing Jesus’ mission, right? See, Emmaus does not want to be an amazing church. I don’t know if you know that. We don’t want to be amazing. We want to be faithful, right? We want to be disciples. We want to be people who stay near Jesus, even when we’re challenged deeply, and offended by what he says, because we submit to him, because it’s his work. See, we want to be a faithful church through the ordinary means that Jesus prescribes. And, we’ve already heard in the parables of Jesus that that kingdom growth is slow, it’s often unseen, unnoticed, unremarkable, but steady. And, eventually, has the power to grow large, where all people, all nations find rest in it. 

See, being a faithful church means we do take seriously what Jesus teaches here, and I think he’s teaching something very important that we need to be reminded of, and I’ll just end on this, here, with you. That, unbelief is not simply a matter of a lack of information. What do I mean by that? What I mean, is that sin causes a rebellious heart that’s sick, and refuses to kneel, refuses to see. And, it is not the position of a human being to God that we just need a little bit more knowledge, we just need a couple more miracles, we need a couple more teachings of Jesus, and that’s all we need. We need a new heart. We need Jesus to seek us out. These passages should be familiar to you … Luke 19 … the son of man came to seek and save the lost … John 6:44 … no one can come to me unless the Father draws him … Romans 3 … none is righteous, no not one. Noone seeks after God, they have all turned aside … this passage should remind us that we do not just need more information, we need a new heart.

And, if Jesus is the king, then what is it we’re supposed to do? Well, this is where having gospel communities is helpful. Cause, this is where we go to do and think hard about this. What’s our job, then? Well, there’s two things I’ll just say here about the rest of this passage in chapter 6, and that is this. That, Jesus sends out his disciples to do the very same ministry, and have the very same message as Jesus. He sends them out, and he says, I want you to go preach repentance, he doesn’t tell you to preach something else, he says preach repentance, and they go, and they do the same miracles that we’ve already seen in chapters 1-5. The disciples go out, and they do the very works, and say the very message of Jesus, and that’s what we need to do as a church. We need to do nothing else besides that.

The other thing, is that I don’t know if you were reading this passage, if you didn’t read it in the scripture this morning, but in chapter 14, all of a sudden we’re talking about Jesus, and Nazareth, and all of these things, and all of a sudden it cuts to Jerusalem and we’re talking about John the Baptist. Why does it do that? It seems so out of place, it’s like a jump scene change. Isn’t it intriguing? Why is that what happens? Because, I think John the Baptist is an object lesson for what that looks like, because John the Baptist was a follower of Jesus, and he was uncompromising in his message, and what happened to him? He was killed. And, like Jesus, it said Herod enjoyed hearing John the Baptist preach, and yet he killed him. Why? See, Jesus says if you’re going to be sent out with my message, and do my works, this is how you’re going to be received. You’re going to be received the same way I am, where people might like you, but they don’t want anything to do with you. 

See, and here’s the thing I want to encourage you, lastly, with, is that John the Baptist - who Jesus says is the greatest man born of a woman, he’s one of us, because in Luke 7, we have an account of John the Baptist in prison, and John the Baptist sends some of his disciples to Jesus and says this … the disciples of John reported all of these things that Jesus was doing to him, and John called his disciples to him, and sent them to the Lord, saying, are you the one who is to come, or shall we look for another? When the men had come to him, they said, John the Baptist has sent us to you, saying, are you the one who has come, or shall we look for another? … See, John the Baptist was like you and me. He was striving to be faithful to Jesus, but when he got put in prison, he started meeting resistance, and he started to become persecuted, he said, is Jesus really the one? He had doubts. Is Jesus really the king? Is he really the one who’s going to come, or should we wait for another? 

We’re in good company with John, because we know that this is what Jesus’ kingdom is like. We need to be offended by it. We need to be sent out with the same message of Jesus, and we know we’re going to both encounter resistance in our own souls, and we’re going to encounter resistance out there. And, as such, we’re about to come to the king’s table, and we come to the king’s table without cost to ourselves, but with infinite cost to him. We come to a small, ordinary meal to remind us that we need to allow Jesus to reign, and to speak deeply into our lives, even if it offends us, and even if it makes us what to run away, because as Peter rightly said to Jesus, to whom else will we go? Where else will we go? You have the words of eternal life. 

Let’s pray,

Father, 

We thank you for your kingdom, that it comes in an unassuming way, but that it comes with power. That it comes into the ordinary, and that you come with both grace, and truth, that you come with both love and offense. Thank you that that offense is exactly what we need. We need to hear that our only hope is you. So, as we come and prepare our hearts, to come to recieve your table, would you help us to have that in our minds, and we come to you offended. We come to you at war with ourselves, and you are our only hope, to make us whole, to make us citizens of your kingdom. We love you, we ask that you would be honored as we come as your family to share this meal. In Jesus’ good name, amen.