Gospel of Mark

The Power and Goodness of Christ-Full Sermon Transcript

Link to Blog

PASTOR: FORREST SHORT

SCRIPTURE READING

Jesus Calms a Storm 

On that day, when evening had come, he said to them, “Let us go across to the other side.” And leaving the crowd, they took him with them in the boat, just as he was. And other boats were with him. And a great windstorm arose, and the waves were breaking into the boat, so that the boat was already filling. But he was in the stern, asleep on the cushion. And they woke him and said to him, “Teacher, do you not care that we are perishing?” And he awoke and rebuked the wind and said to the sea, “Peace! Be still!” And the wind ceased, and there was a great calm. He said to them, “Why are you so afraid? Have you still no faith?” And they were filled with great fear and said to one another, “Who then is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him?”

Jesus Heals a Man with a Demon 

They came to the other side of the sea, to the country of the Gerasenes. And when Jesus had stepped out of the boat, immediately there met him out of the tombs a man with an unclean spirit. He lived among the tombs. And no one could bind him anymore, not even with a chain, for he had often been bound with shackles and chains, but he wrenched the chains apart, and he broke the shackles in pieces. No one had the strength to subdue him. Night and day among the tombs and on the mountains he was always crying out and cutting himself with stones. And when he saw Jesus from afar, he ran and fell down before him. And crying out with a loud voice, he said, “What have you to do with me, Jesus, Son of the Most High God? I adjure you by God, do not torment me.” For he was saying to him, “Come out of the man, you unclean spirit!” And Jesus asked him, “What is your name?” He replied, “My name is Legion, for we are many.” And he begged him earnestly not to send them out of the country. Now a great herd of pigs was feeding there on the hillside, and they begged him, saying, “Send us to the pigs; let us enter them.” So he gave them permission. And the unclean spirits came out and entered the pigs; and the herd, numbering about two thousand, rushed down the steep bank into the sea and drowned in the sea.

The herdsmen fled and told it in the city and in the country. And people came to see what it was that had happened. And they came to Jesus and saw the demon-possessed man, the one who had had the legion, sitting there, clothed and in his right mind, and they were afraid. And those who had seen it described to them what had happened to the demon-possessed man and to the pigs. And they began to beg Jesus to depart from their region. As he was getting into the boat, the man who had been possessed with demons begged him that he might be with him. And he did not permit him but said to him, “Go home to your friends and tell them how much the Lord has done for you, and how he has had mercy on you.” And he went away and began to proclaim in the Decapolis how much Jesus had done for him, and everyone marveled.

—Mark 4:35 - 5:20 ESV

INTRO

Good morning, I’m Forrest, I’m one of the pastors here, and as always, it is good to be with you. Do we have any Chronicles of Narnia fans out there? Alright, a lot. Yeah, at this point it’s kind of become a part of our pop culture with the movies popularizing it, and I think one of the most well known lines from The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe encapsulates well what our text is bringing to us this morning.

If you remember in the story, we’ll kind of geek out for a second here, Mr. Beaver tells Susan that Aslan, the ruler of Narnia,is a lion. Do you remember this? And, Susan is surprised because she assumes that Aslan is a man, certainly a ruler is a man. She then tells Mr. Beaver, I shall feel rather nervous about meeting a lion. She asks Mr. Beaver then, subsequently, if Aslan is safe, to which Mr. Beaver replies … 

“Safe? Who said anything about safe? ‘Course he isn’t safe. But he’s good. He’s the King.”

—The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe

This line encapsulates our two narratives this morning. Nothing with unmanageable power is safe. And, at the same time, not everything with unmanageable power is good. I wonder if this morning, we think of Jesus in that way. I wonder, do we believe him to be powerful, and good. See, we must believe him to be both, or we will end up living anemic Christian lives at best. In every season of life, do we believe that he is both powerful and good. And so, I think in our text, in the first narrative, we have a story of Christ’s power laced with his goodness. And, I think in the second story, of the Gerasene demoniac, we have a story of Christ’s goodness, laced with his power. So, this morning, the track we’re going to walk, there’s a lot of ground to cover here, there are many layers.

So, I’d encourage you to try to track with me this morning. We’re actually going to start in apocalyptic literature. That would be the point at which you may feel like hitting the eject button. Don’t do it, track with me, otherwise you may wake up in the middle of the sermon wondering where we are, feeling like maybe I just told you you were possessed with a demon, and I promise you, that’s not the point of the sermon this morning. So, track with me, I think there’s big payoff, a lot of layers. This week in studying God’s word, I was reminded of the richness of it, that it’s so rich, that we can spend our lives plumbing its depths and never exhaust it, yet at the same time it’s so simple that a kid can grasp it and respond to it with faith in Jesus Christ.

So, the task before us this morning, then, is to see, how do we see in our text that Jesus is both good, and powerful? So, let’s pray before we jump in.

Jesus,

we are thankful for this great truth. Lord, it is easy for one of those aspects of who you are to become undermined in our own hearts, and in our own minds. Lord, as we come to your text, we are thankful that it is powerful, and it is sharp as a two-edged sword, and it cuts deeply, and we are grateful for that. Lord, reveal to us our desperate need for you this morning, in whatever season of life we find ourselves. And, we thank you in Jesus’ name, amen. 

So, the book of Daniel is an apocalyptic, hyper-political book. You may actually, what you probably know of Daniel, is - at the very least - you know the story of Shadrach, Meschach, and Abednego, which tends to be sort of the Sunday school story. But, the reality is, there’s a lot going on in the book of Daniel. It’s very apocalyptic, and it’s very political, and in the midst of it, Daniel sees a vision of four beasts coming up out of the sea, that were - it says later in verse 17 of chapter 7 of Daniel, they are identified as kings. These were kings, these were powers. And, I want to read that in Daniel … 

Daniel declared, “I saw in my vision by night, and behold, the four winds of heaven were stirring up the great sea. And four great beasts came up out of the sea, different from one another. The first was like a lion and had eagles’ wings. Then as I looked its wings were plucked off, and it was lifted up from the ground and made to stand on two feet like a man, and the mind of a man was given to it. And behold, another beast, a second one, like a bear. It was raised up on one side. It had three ribs in its mouth between its teeth; and it was told, ‘Arise, devour much flesh.’ After this I looked, and behold, another, like a leopard, with four wings of a bird on its back. And the beast had four heads, and dominion was given to it. After this I saw in the night visions, and behold, a fourth beast, terrifying and dreadful and exceedingly strong. It had great iron teeth; it devoured and broke in pieces and stamped what was left with its feet. It was different from all the beasts that were before it, and it had ten horns.

—Daniel 7:2-7 ESV

So, this vision comes. It’s identified, again, in verse 17, that these are powers, kings, these are nations that Daniel is foreseeing through this vision, that are going to come to power, and devour the world. The first one, most scholars agree, is Babylon, the Babylonian Empire a few hundred years before Jesus. The second would be the Medo Persian Empire, the third would be the Greeks and Alexander the Great, and then the fourth was the Roman Empire, which was the final climax of these world powers. The book of Mark is written some 30 odd years after the life of Jesus. And, it’s written, it’s audience is citizens of Rome, who were facing persecution and death under the brutal rule of Caesar Nero.

Mark wants his readers to make this connection, a connection between these narratives of calming the storm, and the Gerasene demoniac being delivered, he wants them to make a connection between these narratives, and their current persecuted reality under the reign of the powerful Roman empire. He wants them to see his power and goodness in the midst of the powerful evil they find themselves in, and he wants us to see the same thing this morning. No matter where we are in life, he wants us to see his power, and his goodness, and that’s what we see in the first narrative, a great power. 

I. A GREAT POWER 


So, Jesus has been teaching in parables, and on the power of the kingdom of God. I should say, remember that sea motif, that these beasts rose up out of the sea, because that’s going to come up in both narratives. There’s some connections there. Jesus has been teaching in parables. If you remember last week, Max, the last two weeks, Max has walked us through those. He’s been teaching in parables on the power of the kingdom of God, how the kingdom of God continues, that it’s this unstoppable force, it begins as a seed, a small seed, but nothing can stop it.

And, when he’s finished with this teaching, he’s teaching from the boat, kind of using the water and the embankment as an amphitheater, we’re told in verses 35 and 36, that they essentially take up the anchor, and begin to cross the sea of Galilee to the other side. And, it tells us that other boats accompany them, so they’re not by themselves, and as they’re crossing the Sea of Galilee - which was a lake on the north side of the region of Galilee, it was a lake that was seven miles wide, it was 13 miles long, so it was a large lake, it was even on the border of a sea, this lake, this sea, was also 700 feet below sea level, with mountains on both sides - not small mountains, big mountains on both sides. You can see them even today. Particularly, the eastern mountains are exceedingly tall. The tallest one is Mount Hermon, and it’s 9,200 feet above sea level. So, this means that that reality, the lake 700 feet below sea level, the mountains around it max out at around 9,200 feet, so what you get, all of you meteorologists out there like me, is the warm air rises, right, the cold air descends, and when those two meet, crazy stuff can happen. Storms can whip up really quick, and that is exactly what happens as Jesus and the disciples cross the sea of Galilee.

It should be noted, too, that the Jewish people were not seafaring people, naturally. It wasn’t in their history to be seafaring people. Now, we know they’ve adapted to some degree, because as Mark begins, Jesus is calling fishermen, people who are fishing on the sea of Galilee. So, they’ve made some adjustments, but historically, they are not vikings by any stretch of the imagination. They were 12 tribes from the desert that God brought into a home in the mediteranean.

Now, in the ancient near east, the sea had a dark symbolism, and you see this, actually, throughout scripture, from Genesis to Revelation. It had this dark symbolism, it was one of evil and chaos and demonic powers that were raging against  the creator. We see this in a few spots, some scriptures that point this out … 

“And darkness was over the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God was hovering over the face of the waters”

—Genesis 1:2 ESV

So, you get darkness and waters put together there in that text … 

Psalm 93 says, “The floods were lifted up …” We know floods are not a good thing … “Oh Lord, the Floods had lifted up their voice, the floods lift up their roaring, mightier than the thunders of many waters, mightier than the ways of the sea, the Lord on high is mighty …” 

And, what we just read …

“And four great beasts came up out of the sea, different from one another.”

—Daniel 7:3 ESV

And then finally, even at the end, even though this would not have been in view for the readers, then … 

“Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth, for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and the sea was no more.”

—Revelation 21:1 ESV

So, we get this picture throughout scripture. There are many, many more scriptures that if you were to just do kind of a biblical study of the word sea, you would see that it is fraught with chaos, and darkness. Suffice it to say, that when the Jewish people thought of the sea, they did not think of vacations, and drinks with umbrellas in them. What came to mind, was a clash of order and chaos, a place where God and evil rage against one another. Additionally, they were going to the other side, it says. They are heading into a Gentile region called Decapolis, which was basically a federation of 10 cities that was under Roman rule, and this means that they were leaving this place of covenant, this land of covenant, and coming into this - in the Jewish mind, what would have been this dark, evil place of Roman rule. 

So, you get the picture that this would have been a journey for the disciples of Jesus. And, as they’re crossing, the scripture there tells us … a  great windstorm arises … Now, we don’t know the exact boat they were in, but one of the most popular boats at the time was a 20 foot long boat, 7 feet wide, may or may not have had a sail, had oars. It could fit about 15 people. Most likely, they were traveling in something similar to that. What we need to get, is that it was not a ship, it was a boat, two very different things, especially when you’re in the midst of a hurricane. 

So, verse 37, we see that the waves begin crashing into the boat, and the boat begins to fill with water. Now, you can imagine at this moment, all of their fears are coming to be realized. The dark, ominous chaos of the water, the trip over not to the land of covenant, but the land of Roman rule, this dark place, and the darkness and the chaos comes to bear on them. And, in that moment, as their boat is filling with water and they are undoubtedly about to sink into the sea, into the chaos, in that moment they look to their teacher. They look for some comfort, for some assurance, because he’s the reason they’re out there.

Remember, they’re not  in the midst of the storm because they were disobedient. There are a lot of, actually, parallels, here, in the opposite direction, though, between Jonah and what’s happening here. A lot of scholars make that connection. But, what’s happening here is that they have followed Jesus. They haven’t run from him, they’ve followed Jesus, yet they find themselves in the midst of the storm. And, as they look to their great leader for comfort and assurance, they find him asleep on a cushion. Can you imagine that moment? Asleep on a cushion, because that’s what you do in the midst of a hurricane, when you’re in the sea. You just catch a little cat nap.

You can imagine that moment. And, often times, when we see the disciples’ interaction with Jesus, it’s easy for us in our arrogance to look at it and simply say, wow, they were really ignorant. Right? Sometimes - like an example - the sons of Zebedee go to Jesus and they’re like, Jesus, who’s going to be greatest in your kingdom? And, you’re reading it going, agh, really? You are such a knucklehead. Yet, we do it all the time, right? We do it in ways that we don’t even recognize. But, this is not one of those moments, where even in our arrogance we can look at it and go, why did they do that? 

I think this a perfectly reasonable question. Teacher, do you not care that we are perishing? Jesus is asleep in the midst of the storm, he’s gotten them into this trouble, and yet he doesn’t even seem to be concerned. Verse 39 tells us what happens … And he awoke and rebuked the wind and said to the sea, “Peace! Be still!” And the wind ceased, and there was a great calm … Jesus wakes up and he immediately rebukes the wind. He speaks to it as if it were a child, and where there once was a great storm, there is now a great calm. And, the sense is that even the water is calm, which you see Jesus’ power in that reality, if you think about a bunch of kids in a swimming pool, and they’re playing around, and then all of a sudden they get out, the water doesn’t immediately go calm, right? It says chopping. But, Jesus in his power calms the wind and he calms the waves. 

This story, in many ways, is very straight forward. We know the reality of storms, don’t we? It takes one phone call, one e-mail, one text message, one moment, and a sudden storm hits. Life can be like that, right? Evil, chaos, hits us out of nowhere. And, if you’re like the rest of us, or, I should say, if you’re like me, the disciples, the pattern of the disciples here looks very familiar. What’s the first thing we do when the storm hits? We freak out. Right? That’s the only rational thing to do, is freak out when the storm hits. What’s happening? And then, we question whether God really cares for us. I’m following you, how can you put me in the midst of this storm?

But, the story climaxes in a question. And, it climaxes in a question that feels like a cliffhanger, but it’s not because the answer is embedded in the story. It’s what Mark wants us to walk away with. As they continue, verse 40, he said to them … Why are you so afraid? Have you still no faith?” And they were filled with great fear and said to one another, “Who then is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him?” …


The opening line of Mark’s gospel reads … The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the son of God … scholars call this a messianic secret motif. All it means, is you’re in on something from the very beginning, that the rest of the players other than Christ, in the story, are not in on. You know from the get-go that this is the son of God, the one that was prophesied about in the Old Testament, that has, specifically in Isaiah, that has now come in the flesh. And, we know that, but at this point, the disciples were unaware of this reality. See, they think he’s just a rabbi, a really good teacher with an extra measure of God’s power. But, now, this is starting to look a little peculiar. They know that in the Hebrew scriptures, that only God has power over the sea. They know Psalm 107, which says … some went out into the sea in ships, and when the storm hits they cry out to Yahweh, and by his power, and his power alone, the waves are hushed … They know this. 

And, it’s also peculiar that Jesus doesn’t conjure. In other words, Jesus doesn’t call on a higher power. Like every other legend of antiquity, when they’re faced with this unmanageable, uncontrollable power, they conjure a higher power, Jesus doesn’t do that. Jesus speaks directly to the storm. See, he’s not calling on a higher power, because Mark wants us to see that he is the higher power. Remember, in the beginning in Genesis when darkness was over the face of the deep, and the spirit of God hovered over it, Jesus is saying, that was me, in the beginning, the creator. So, who then, is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him. And, the answer is, the creator of all things, with unmatched and unmanageable power, and the chaos of the sea is at my command. 

Point one … the great power. 

II. A GREAT COMPASSION

Next, we see, as we move to the next story - and then we’re going to bring these two together - is great compassion, or it might be said, a great good. Now, this next story, the Gerasene demoniac, takes place in decapolis, on the southeastern side of the sea. Again, it was a federation of 10 cities, first colonized by Alexander the Great, and during this particular time was conquered by the Roman empire. And, Jesus is unleashing the kingdom of God not just in Israel, but throughout the world. And, if you follow the trajectory of scripture, that is always the plan, that the earth will be filled with the knowledge of the glory of the Lord, which means that this gospel, this good news, this kingdom must go outside of Israel, it must go to the world, it must go to the Gentile nations. 

So, Jesus pushes through to bring his kingdom to the world, but there’s an anti-kingdom, there’s a dominion of darkness, and Jesus faces resistance from the moment he starts to go to the other side. First in the sea, and in the storm, and then in the demoniac. And, underneath this there’s a root of evil, a dark power that is at the source of this resistance. As Jesus enters into the Gentile territory, a man with an unclean spirit comes from the graveyard to meet him. Look at verses 2-6 … 

And when Jesus had stepped out of the boat, immediately there met him out of the tombs a man with an unclean spirit. He lived among the tombs. And no one could bind him anymore, not even with a chain, for he had often been bound with shackles and chains, but he wrenched the chains apart, and he broke the shackles in pieces. No one had the strength to subdue him. Night and day among the tombs and on the mountains he was always crying out and cutting himself with stones. And when he saw Jesus from afar, he ran and fell down before him. And crying out with a loud voice, he said, “What have you to do with me, Jesus, Son of the Most High God? I adjure you by God, do not torment me.” …

It’s a pretty bleak picture of this man’s existence, isn’t it? Now, I feel like we have to take a moment to do a little bit of work, because it would be very easy for us in this western culture, in this particular time, to keep this story at distance, to keep this story at arm’s length, to simply say it’s a superstitious sort of phenomenon that belongs in antiquity, that belongs in another time. When, culturally, we function as if what is real is only what can be tested and poked and prodded in a laboratory. If we say we believe in a supernatural and personal, good God, then it is no leap at all to say we believe in a personal and supernatural evil. In fact, it follows.

In the biblical worldview, the fact is, the universe is teeming with activity that cannot necessarily be tested. Listen to what Paul says here in Ephesians, and I want you to remember, Paul has been talking in this letter about how to walk in love, how wives and husbands are to love one another and lay down their lives. He’s been talking about the new life in Christ, unity in the body, some very practical things here, loving one another. And then, as he gets to the end of this letter, he brings us to what might be a strange place to us. Look here at Ephesians 6:10-16 …

“Finally, be strong in the Lord and in the strength of his might. Put on the whole armor of God, that you may be able to stand against the schemes of the devil. For we do not wrestle against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the cosmic powers over this present darkness, against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly places. Therefore take up the whole armor of God, that you may be able to withstand in the evil day, and having done all, to stand firm. Stand therefore, having fastened on the belt of truth, and having put on the breastplate of righteousness, and, as shoes for your feet, having put on the readiness given by the gospel of peace. In all circumstances … [does that include your circumstance? Yes.] … take up the shield of faith, with which you can extinguish all the flaming darts of the evil one.”

—Ephesians 6:10-16 ESV

In all circumstances. Do you hear what Paul is saying? In the midst of a letter where he has been very practical, husbands, love your wives, church, you are one body, live into that reality. He’s saying, do not lose sight that there is a world, here, teeming with spiritual forces that have schemes that are seeking to disrupt. See, what scripture tells us is that inbetween the creator God, a being with no equal and the seven billion plus people on the earth, there is an invisible world filled with spiritual beings, with angels, with demons. Some of these are in league with the creator, working to usher in God’s kingdom, but others are at war with the creator, and wreaking havoc wherever they can. 

The biblical understanding of demons, though, is not a simple one or a superstitious one, or a naive one. Rather, it’s complex, and it’s multidimensional. I know we’ve seen Poltergeist and people’s head spinning, and we have things that come to mind when we hear this stuff, but if you look at the totality of scripture and how it reveals to us the reality of sin and our struggle, it is not reductionary at all. Certain worldviews tend to be reductionary, we tend to reduce our problems to one aspect, maybe it’s physical, you’re probably is just physical. I heard the phrase this week, I guess it’s a new thing, I need to do a geographical … and what that means is, like, where I live is not working out for me, so I need to move somewhere, right? So i’m going to do a geographical. The problem is, as one really wise person said, everywhere you go, there you are. So, you can do the geographical, but you’re still there. 

But, we tend to reduce things in that way. Physical, or mental, or moralistic, your problem is just guilt and shame, you need to deal with that, or spiritual, it’s only spiritual, and we see demons everywhere. True story, when my mother first came to Christ, neither one of us were believers, later in life she was trying to find churches, and she was in deep south Louisiana, and she went to a church, and they told her she had a chocolate demon, and they tried to cast it out of her. So, talk about reductionary. I’m like … I think i have one of those, if that’s a thing … I’m going to come see you guys … 

So, we tend to be reductionistic in our worldviews, but scripture is not this way. Scripture gives weight to each one of these realities, mental, moral, physical, spiritual, all of the above, they’re all interlocking. And, therefore, there’s no one template. But, I think in our culture, what we’re the quickest to dismiss, is this particular world, this world of principalities and powers, where Paul says, you’re not wrestling against what you think you’re wrestling against. 

See, if we reject personal spiritual evil, we will be blind to a significant power at work that stirs up our struggle, and stirs up our sin, and creates chaos. See, we see demon possessed, and we go, oh, I’m good. I’m cool. There is none of me in this guy. I mean, he’s … and, when you read the description, it’s easy to put distance between us and him. What’s interesting, is that the Greek words that describe this state never actually use the word possession. It’s essentially the word for demonize, over and over and over again. So, I know there’s been a lot of debate around categories and oppression and possession, but as I dig into the text, into scripture, and there’s definitely a place for those conversations, but what I see is there’s more this influence at work that we need to be awake to.

Don’t forget, though, what Paul is saying. Essentially, he gets to … so, if we’re proud, if we’re self centered, if we’re angry, and these things are taking root in us, and there’s bitterness in us, make no mistake that there is some aspect of influence going on there. See, our struggles - this will really unsettle us - our struggles are not so much different from the demoniac in kind, but in degree. His patterns even are probably familiar. I know they are for me.

When I tend to go in a difficult place, a dark place, what do we see in the demoniac’s life, the way he was living? We see isolation. Don’t we tend to want to be left alone? We don’t want anyone talking to us, I don’t want to hear your Jesus stuff, just leave me alone, let me binge on Netflix, or put my head under the covers, right? Just leave me alone. Or, we’re in bondage, right? Perhaps there’s sin that we’ve been struggling with for years, and we find ourselves not able to see that bondage broken. Even harming himself. Now, there is a very overt way, he’s cutting himself with stones. That happens in different ways today, but there are other ways we tend to do that, right? We tend to harm ourselves through things like binge eating, or things that we run to, that we know are not good for us, but we run to those things for comfort. Make no mistake, Paul is saying in every circumstance, be on guard. There are schemes at work. So, we are not as different from the demoniac as we might like to believe.

Now, how do we see the goodness of Jesus? We said this about compassion, and it is. The goodness of Jesus is demonstrated in that he goes to the worst of the worst. He goes to a man that feels so far gone, compared to perhaps where we are, and he does that with intention, he does that with purpose, he does that because he wants us to see that we have hope, that where we, and our station in life, whatever these schemes are that are at work, that we are not too far gone, that his goodness is not present with us in the midst of it, and that his power is not strong enough to rescue us. He comes to the worst of the worst, the most vile, the most detestable, the most unclean in a graveyard, the place that a Jewish person would never go. Jesus goes to the depth with this man so that you and I might have hope from our depths.

And, there’s another layer here that’s happening. Notice he asks in verse 9 … what is your name? … and the answer is … my name is Legion, for we are many … A legion was the largest Roman military unit. It would have been about 5 or 6,000 people at this time, and they were known for their brutality and their destruction. So, we begin to see allusions and connections that would have been made for those early readers, that perhaps are lost on us. They see, okay, we’re seeing power over Rome, we’re seeing goodness in the midst of it, coming to rescue, and we’re seeing power over it, even the strange reality of the pigs, right? I mean, this is a strange story, there’s no doubt. Look what happens … 

And he begged him earnestly not to send them out of the country. Now a great herd of pigs was feeding there on the hillside, and they begged him, saying, “Send us to the pigs; let us enter them.” So he gave them permission. And the unclean spirits came out and entered the pigs; and the herd, numbering about two thousand, rushed down the steep bank into the sea and drowned in the sea … 

Do you see the connection? Do you see, in Daniel, he says this power is coming, and it is a great power, and it is going to engulf the world, and here we see Jesus coming in the midst of this power, in the midst of this legion, and he brings redemption, and he brings healing, and he brings restoration, and then he demonstrates his power. Even with the pigs, there was a Gerasen that the Roman legion had, where their actual mascot, essentially, was a wild boar, because the Jewish people called the Romans pigs, and so what they did to kind of get back at them, is they said fine, we’ll raise the flag, we’ll be your pigs. So, there’s some real connections here that would have been made that show Christ’s power over what seems to be the most unmanageable power in the world. 

And then, finally, I love towards the end the picture of the healing that happens in verse 15 … 

And they came to Jesus and saw the demon-possessed man, the one who had had the legion, sitting there, clothed and in his right mind, and they were afraid … 

Could you imagine this man that far gone, no longer able to be subdued, living among the graves, cutting himself, he is sitting - not naked - but clothed, not completely gone mentally, but present in his right mind. This is the holistic, deep healing of Jesus. This is the goodness of God at work, and if there is hope for him, there’s hope for you, there’s hope for me wherever we find ourselves.

And, finally, the man wants to go with Jesus. And, it’s interesting, Jesus doesn’t let him. Isn’t Jesus the one who says, come follow me? Yet, he says, no, actually. Look what he tells him in verse 19 … 

… And he did not permit him but said to him, “Go home to your friends and tell them how much the Lord has done for you, and how he has had mercy on you.” And he went away and began to proclaim in the Decapolis how much Jesus had done for him, and everyone marveled … 

See, Jesus is not safe, but he is good. Remember, Jesus has been run out of town. 2,000 pigs were killed. That’s no small thing. That had serious economic consequences for the people of Decapolis, and they ran him out of town because of it, and Jesus says, no, you’re not coming with me, you’re going to stay in the midst of that and declare my goodness. He is not safe, but he is good. He says, tell what the Lord - Yahweh - has done for you, and notice in verse 20, he tells how much Jesus has done for him, the creator and Jesus are one and the same. See, we are back to the power and authority of Jesus, which leads us to the last point here … a great fear. 

III. A GREAT FEAR

If you notice, throughout both narratives, there is fear woven throughout it. Notice 4:38, there’s fear of the storm, in chapter 4:41, fear of Jesus’ power to calm the storm. It’s funny, before Jesus calms the storm, they’re scared, but after they’re more scared. Fear of the demoniac is not explicit, but no one had the strength to subdue him, it says, in 4:5. The demon’s fear of Jesus’ power over them, in verse 7 … do not torment me … fear of Jesus’ power to heal the demoniac, in 5:15. They don’t rejoice when they see this man in his right man and clothed, they fear. 

Why? Why is there fear throughout both of these stories when there should be, it seems, rejoicing? Because, fear rises when we find ourselves in the midst of a power we cannot control. The difference between the power of the storm, the power of the demoniac, and the power of Christ, is that only one of those loves you, is that only one of those cares for us. See, the storm, the principalities and powers are not good, and therefore don’t have your good in mind, but the one who has power over them does. He is good, and he has your good in mind. 

Notice in verse 40 of the narrative of calming the storm, Jesus has been questioned. Jesus, don’t you care about us? Don’t you see what’s happening? But, notice that the questioned becomes the questioner, and he asks them in verse 40 … Why are you so afraid? Have you still no faith? … And, here’s where the power and goodness of God come to bear in our lives. He’s saying, essentially, if you knew I loved you, and if you knew my infinite power, you could have been calm in the storm. He’s saying, I can still care for you and allow you to go through storms. The issue is, your premise is wrong. And, I would submit to you today, that oftentimes our premise is wrong. The premise is wrong. You don’t see me for truly who I am.

Our premise tends to be, if you love us, you wouldn’t let us go through storms. But, that’s a false premise. Jesus says, I’m God, and I know better than you, and I am not safe, but I am good. So, I think part of what comes to bear for us, is when we find ourselves in the middle of the storm, wake him, ask him if he cares for you, but don’t be surprised when the questioned becomes the questioner, when God questions us. See, Mark’s invitation for us is to turn from questioning God, to answering God’s question. In light of such authority and power, and care, why are you so afraid? Why do you still have no faith? Do you see how Jesus is demonstrating both his authority and his goodness?

See, in the Gerasene demoniac, Jesus goes to the worst of the worst, and when he was done, he was clothed and in his right mind. But, Jesus goes one step further, so that we might have an immovable reminder of his power and his goodness. When we get to the end of the book of Mark, we see that Jesus exchanges places with this man. Jesus, as he goes to the cross, is now naked. Jesus, as he goes to the cross, is now crying out and bleeding. Jesus is driven to the tomb. That’s how Jesus dealt with evil, that’s how Jesus deals with evil today, not with the sword, but by taking evil upon himself, so that he could wipe out evil without wiping out us.

In the cross of Christ, we have a fixed and perpetual reminder of his power and his goodness. See, if Jesus were not powerful, the cross would have no efficacy. It would have no effect in our lives. If he were not good, he never would have gone to the cross in the first place. And, here is where it all comes to bear for us, this morning, as God’s people in light of his word. See, if we believe he is powerful, but not good, we are driven away from him. If we believe he is good, but not powerful, we are driven to pity him. But, if we believe he is good and powerful, we are driven to trust him in any and every season of life, and that is the invitation of our text this morning, and that’s the thrust of the invitation as we come to the communion table. Let’s pray. 

Jesus,

We are grateful that in every season of life, we have a fixed and perpetual reminder of your goodness to us, of your power that is unmatched and unmanageable. Lord, I know there are many storms brewing in each of our lives today. Really, there’s never a season where there’s not some kind of storm, whether it’s a great one or a mild one, Lord, in the midst of this fallen world, sudden storms are normal. So, Lord, we ask this morning in the midst of our storms, Lord, we ask that we would see your great power, and your great goodness. Lord, may we never see our circumstances are more powerful than you, and may we never see our circumstances as undermining your goodness. Lord, we are grateful this morning for this beauty, we are grateful this morning for this truth. Lord, as we come to the table, Lord, may we come believing, trusting, renewing our faith by your Spirit, that you are good, and you are all powerful. I pray that every heart in this room would find rest in that truth. We ask in Jesus’ name, amen.


A New Kind of Day-Full Sermon Transcript

Link to Blog

PASTOR: FORREST SHORT

SCRIPTURE READING

“And rising very early in the morning, while it was still dark, he departed and went out to a desolate place, and there he prayed. And Simon and those who were with him searched for him, and they found him and said to him, “Everyone is looking for you.” And he said to them, “Let us go on to the next towns, that I may preach there also, for that is why I came out.” And he went throughout all Galilee, preaching in their synagogues and casting out demons. And a leper came to him, imploring him, and kneeling said to him, “If you will, you can make me clean.” Moved with pity, he stretched out his hand and touched him and said to him, “I will; be clean.” And immediately the leprosy left him, and he was made clean. And Jesus sternly charged him and sent him away at once, and said to him, “See that you say nothing to anyone, but go, show yourself to the priest and offer for your cleansing what Moses commanded, for a proof to them.” But he went out and began to talk freely about it, and to spread the news, so that Jesus could no longer openly enter a town, but was out in desolate places, and people were coming to him from every quarter.” 

—Mark 1:35–45 ESV

INTRO

Well, good morning. Good to see you all, good to be with you. My name’s Forrest, and I’m one of the pastors here at Emmaus. And, what we want to do this morning is pray right off the bat, and then we’re going to jump into our text and continue in our series in the book of Mark. So, let’s pray. 

Jesus,
We are grateful this morning for your goodness towards us. Lord, we recognize that we are weak, needful people, and that you are an all-sufficient God who meets us in our weakness. Lord, we’re grateful for that truth this morning, we’re grateful for the power and the strength of your word that comes to bear in the hearts of your people by your Spirit. And, I pray this morning that that work would be happening in each of our hearts. Lord, we ask for those this morning that may not know you as savior, Lord, we ask that you would draw them to yourself. For those of that do, Lord, we pray the same prayer. Draw us to yourself again. We ask in Jesus’ name, Amen. 

Well, again, it’s good to see you this morning. As I was studying this week, I read a modern day parable that I think sets our text up pretty well. It’s pretty short, but here’s what it says … 

There once was a man who cared so much about trees that he traveled constantly on their behalf. But, while he educated everywhere and tended personally to infected arbors far and wide, storms and swarms came through the man’s hometown from time to time. Gusts blew down the pine and oak in his own neighborhood. Their local roots, it turns out, had hollowed and weakened with weakened with rot. While he was busy and respected dispensing wisdom for bark and leaf, trees were falling in the man’s own yard. No one was there to tend them.

I think this sets our text up well. It’s easy for us to live like the arborist, isn’t it? It’s easy for us to live in the midst of the busyness and the pacing of life, to the degree that the roots in our heart and home are weakened with rot. And, what we see in the life of Jesus this morning, is that he gives us another way. And, we are in the midst of a world and culture that - quite honestly - has never been busier, has never been more inundated with requests to serve, with requests to get busy, to get about work. And, with technology today, it’s very hard to get away from those things. So, what we see with Jesus, I think, is very lifegiving. And, I think it actually is foundational to the life of believers in the modern day 21st century in the West. 

So, we’re going to look at three things here in the text. Surprise, surprise. There’s always three things in the text. Isn’t it amazing how God set up scripture so there was three point sermons throughout it? So, first … being before doing. And then, secondly … being before doing … produces word and deed living … and third … which results in holistic healing.

This is a way of life, and the way we want to look at this text this morning, is this is a new kind of day. It’s a new way to go about your day so that our work produces fruit, and not just busyness. If you remember from last week, we talked about the difference between service and busyness. They’re two very different things. And so, this, I think, digs down a little bit more into how we do that in the midst of our lives.

I. BEING BEFORE DOING…(vv35-37)

So first, being before doing. Notice verses 35-37 … And rising very early in the morning, while it was still dark, he departed and went out to a desolate place, and there he prayed. And Simon and those who were with him searched for him, and they found him and said to him, “Everyone is looking for you.” … You ever feel like that? Everyone is looking … what are you doing in the desolate place? Everyone is looking for you! They need you! From last week’s text, we learned that because of his authority and the healing that resulted from his authority, everybody, it says, in Capernaum, desired an audience with Jesus. We see that in verse 33 … and the whole city was gathered together at the door … and Jesus, it seems, worked well early into the morning healing people, meeting the physical needs.

Remember last week? We said, matter matters. Jesus created it, and he cares about it, and so the physical world is being redeemed as well. But, we see that this dynamic continues into this week’s text, this dynamic of everyone desiring an audience with him. And, it says that everybody wants you, everyone desires you. Now, what’s interesting here, is Jesus has - in this moment - what many of us long for. Jesus has, in this moment, popularity, opportunity for greatness, opportunity for mass productivity. All of you administrators out there, you’re like, oh, I get to organize this mess into something. Right? All of this opportunity is right there before him. Opportunity that, quite honestly, few of us will ever get the chance to experience. 

But, if we’re honest, isn’t it true that even when we begin to experience this, even in the smallest measure, the first thing that we lay aside is solitude, and prayer, and communion with the Father. Isn’t that often the first thing to go in the midst of busyness? In the midst of everyone desiring us, everyone needing us. But, what we see with Jesus, is that the busier he gets, the more intentional he is about prayer, the more intense he is about communion with the Father. In the midst of what seems like an incredible opportunity to capitalize on, Jesus goes out into a desolate place, into an eremos, is the word there in Greek. It’s the same word used earlier in verse 12, the same word used for wilderness in the book of Mark.

And, he most likely spent hours there, going out very early in the morning, and praying until Simon and the other disciples found him. We don’t know how long that was, but it probably wasn’t a 10 minute jaunt into the desert. He was probably out there for hours, while all of these people sought him, while he knew there were physical needs that he was not meeting. It doesn’t say that everyone was healed, it says that some were healed, so there were things left undone, and he was okay with it. In fact, essentially what he’s saying in his action is, my soul, my life depends on this communion with the Father, not on meeting needs. 

So, we don’t know how long he was out there, but he was out there for a long time, and in the midst of this opportunity even to change history, communion with the Father was too vital for Jesus, for it to be squeezed out. And, listen, if the Son of God, completely and perfectly united with the Father, recognizes in the midst of the hairy pace of life, if he recognizes his need for communion with the Father, how much more do we, as weak and easily distracted people, need that communion with the Father?

Anyone else identify with weak and easily distracted? Alright, sweet, I’m in good company this morning. We are. We are weak and easily distracted people. Now, Mark doesn’t tell us the substance of Jesus’ prayer, but if you zoom out and look at Jesus’ prayer life and look at some specific instances, I think we begin to get ahold of the substance of the prayer life of Jesus. In Mark 14, when Jesus is in Gethsemane, you remember he’s facing the reality of the cross. And, it says … he began to be greatly distressed and troubled at the work that was before him … And, he begins his prayer in Mark 14:36 with … Abba Father … 

Abba Father. When the disciples in Luke 11 ask Jesus to teach them to pray, do you remember how he starts? … Our Father … In studying this week, I read about a German scholar who was doing research in New Testament literature, and he discovered that in the entire history of Judaism, in all of these existing books of the Old Testament, and all the existing, extra-biblical Jewish writings dating from the beginning of Judaism until the 10th century A.D., there is not one single reference of a Jewish person addressing God directly in the first person as Father. Not one. The appropriate forms of address for the Jewish people were terms of respect, which is good. But, Jesus is the first Jewish rabbi to call God Father. The first in history. In fact, every recorded prayer of Jesus - except one - he calls God Father. Every single one. 

What’s going on here? Do we see what this is? Do we see what prayer is, then, for Jesus, and therefore what prayer should be for us? Our prayer life is, then, reorientation around who we are, not what we do. This is everything. When we do not work out of this reality, when we do not work out of being, but we work out of doing, we completely get the cart before the horse, and it’s just a matter of time before things go badly. Our attitude, our relationships, the culture of the very place we’re trying to dig in and do work, our prayer life is reorientation around who we are, not what we do.  

If you remember in the early part of chapter 1, in Jesus’ baptism, the Father spoke in verse 11 … you are my beloved Son, with you I am well pleased … You know what prayer is? Prayer is coming back to that again, and again, and again, and reorienting our lives around this foundational truth. This is what Paul says in Galatians 4:6 … and because you are sons, God has sent the Spirit of the Son into our hearts, crying “Abba, Father” … But, we cannot know this in our busyness, and hurry, and longing for the fast and for the famous, rather than the faithful and fruitful. 

There’s a quote from Matthew Henry, you may be familiar with him. He’s a Puritan commentator, wrote a commentary set that’s probably one of the most popular out there. He said this … 

We must study to be quiet…The most of men are ambitious of the honor of great business, and power and preferment; they covet it, they court it, they compass sea and land to obtain it; but the ambition of a Christian should be carried towards quietness. 

—Matthew Henry

To the degree that you and I know the unconditional, Fatherly love of God, is the degree that we do not need power, and comfort, and control, and approval. But, if we go to doing first, we will be operating out of one of those four source idols. Right? When we hear Jesus’ opportunity, the power and control in us says, man, what are you doing? The entire city of Capernaum is longing for you! But, we see Jesus operates out of something deeper. To the degree that you know the Fatherly love of God, is the degree that you do not need power, comfort, control, and approval, and we are not enslaved by them. We live out the freedom we have in Christ through prayer, through communion with the Father. 

Let me ask you this … How many times this past week, did you begin your day with Abba, Father? How many times this past week did you and I - before the pressures and the pace of the day hit full force - begin the day with being, not doing? I can’t tell you how many mornings I wake up, and immediately - my wife will call me on this often - why is your hair on fire? Why can’t you take 10 minutes, slow down, eat a biscuit, and drink some coffee? But, I wake up, my eyes open, and I immediately think what I have to do, what I have to get done, and the amount of time in the week I have to get it, and there’s not enough time in the week to do it. And, it doesn’t drive me to the wilderness for communion with the Father, it drives me to doing before being. But, the call of Christ and the rest of Christ, is that we are called to Abba Father every day, before the pace of the day hits.

So, I want to challenge everyone of us here, this week, see if this week everyone of us can begin the day with Abba, Father. However that looks. I know our lives are crazy, I know some of you have 37 children, all under the age of 1 that you’re trying to wrangle in your house. I know how difficult it is. I hear you. I know you don’t even get bathroom time, but lock the door, five minutes, pretend like you have to go to the bathroom, and commune with the Father. Tie the kids, put them in the closet, whatever you have to do. 

We have to fight for that in the midst of the harried pace of our lives. So, I’m going to challenge you this week, to see if you can do that. To, commit to every morning, I’m going to begin the day with Abba Father. Now, it may feel like detox, because we don’t do this, right? I actually listened to a podcast this week about this guy whose business actually goes into the most remote places he can find in the western United States, and he sets up a mic, and he records it. He just records whatever sounds he hears out there. He looks for the most silent place he can find. And, he says it’s actually very hard to find a place that’s far enough away from a highway, and not in the midst of a flight path, so that you don’t get airplane noise. 

It was very telling, in that it’s really, really hard. He actually said there’s only 9 places in the U.S. he can find where he can literally get silence for a long period of time. And so, the reporter - or, the guy who was producing the podcast - went out with him, and they sat in this place for hours in complete silence. They set up a mic, and they recorded it all. And, when the guy came out - the guy that’s producing the podcast - he came out, and he said, I’m really emotional. He’s like, I began to think about a broken relationship I had. And, essentially what he was saying, is I’ve not been silent, so I never deal with those things. See, what silence does, what solitude does, is it forces what’s deeply in there, that we can’t see in the midst of the harried pace of life, it comes to the surface. And, in the midst of that, we can remind ourselves that we are the Father’s, that we belong to him. Right?

That’s why we are human beings, not human doings. We are beings, right? It’s about who we are, not about what we do. What we do flows out of that. But, that then sets the trajectory for your day. I don’t know if you’ve noticed, but I have. That, in my life when I don’t start with that, when I don’t start with the communion with the Father, it sets the trajectory of my day, and frustration rises easily, trying to prove myself through my doing rises very easily in me. And, I like the term I heard someone use … gospel chill. He said, the older I get, the more gospel chill I have. He’s just experienced life, and he’s seen that God is good, and sovereign, and providential, and that he works in all these things, and it’s not about what I do at the end of the day, though he uses that. But, when it’s all said and done … deep breathe, Abba Father, I’m yours. Nothing can take that from me. 

So, I would encourage you in that this week. See, this is one of the aspects of the fruitfulness of Jesus’ life. It’s the joy of his sonship, and it’s what gives him joy and purpose in the midst of his ministry, in the midst of doing. And so, we must begin there.

II. …PRODUCES WORD AND DEED LIVING…(vv38-39)

So, if we begin there, being before doing produces word and deed living. It’s not being without doing, it’s being before doing, right? The doing comes afterwards. So, it produces word and deed living.

What Jesus is facing, and the people looking for him, is given a little bit more teeth in the parallel in Luke 4. Luke adds … and they urged him not to leave … So, when he’s decided to leave to go preach, they tell him no, don’t do that. So, the totality of what Jesus is facing, is that he has a large throng of people who want him to stay put, and meet their needs through his miracles. But, notice what he says in verses 38 and 39 … And he said to them, “Let us go on to the next towns, that I may preach there also, for that is why I came out.” And he went throughout all Galilee, preaching in their synagogues and casting out demons … Preaching. Jesus essentially says, I’m not just going to stay here and meet the physical needs that you know you have through miracles, but I’m going to meet he need underneath the physical needs that you don’t know you have. 

Jesus says, I have to preach. Now, we know what he’s preaching. We’ve been told that in verse 15, if you remember from a couple weeks ago … the time is fulfilled and the kingdom of God is at hand. Repent and believe the gospel … this is what he was preaching. The call, here, is to repent, to turn from self, and to turn, ultimately, to God for ultimate healing. See, when we as God’s people meet physical needs, we are responding to the needs people know they have. But, people also have spiritual needs that they don’t see as readily, and Jesus is saying, it would be unloving of me not to also preach so that those spiritual needs are met. What they need is to be reconciled to God. It’s what we all need. It’s our greatest need. 

This is the wholeness of kingdom living. Jesus calls the sinner to repent, to turn to himself, and he calls the righteous to serve. Now, believe it or not, there’s debate in the church about this. I know, it’s hard to believe that there’s debate in the church. But, there’s debate around word and deed. What do we do with that? Some people would say, hey, we just preach the gospel and that’s the most important thing, and that’s all that matters. And, as soon as you go into deeds, you’re going into works that undermine the gospel. And, there are those who would say, hey, the people have heard it, we don’t need to preach. Let’s just do it, let’s just do good things, right?

I think, on one side, you have sort of sectarian, by that we mean, set apart from the culture, sectarian fundamentalism. And, on the other side, you have what would be more syncretist, becoming one with the culture, liberalism. It’s less about doctrine, doesn’t matter that much, it’s more about embodying this reality in the midst of the culture. Fundamentalism, on one hand, is about heavy conversion, right? And, we’re all about conversion and people coming to Christ and being born again. But, fundamentalism says it wants heavy conversion, because they want to go there, but it has little emphasis on meeting people’s needs regardless of what they believe. 

Because legalism does not produce compassion, but pride, that camp or that stream, or that ditch you can fall into, from there we end up saying, I’m good and that’s why God loves me, but those people out there, they’re not. Those people are evil. And, we see, in that, we’re missing the grace that’s been shown us as God’s people.

And then, on the other side, there’s syncretist liberalism. They meet all the needs they can, but there’s no call to repentance. There’s no call to coming to faith. And, I’ve talked with actually pastors that would fall more into that camp, and they’ve told me, yeah, we don’t call people to Jesus, we just let them respond however they see fit.

And so, you’ve got these two sides that we tend to lean towards, but here’s what happens. The true gospel, the fullness of the gospel, the whole gospel, produces people who don’t despise the world or reflect the world, but they are utterly different from the world. We, as God’s people, should be utterly different in that we are word and deed people. You cannot read the epistles and the book of James, and not arrive at that conclusion. We are word and deed people.. And so, we as a church are committed to that. We’re not going to debate that. We are about meeting physical needs in our community, and the surrounding communities, and we are about preaching the good news of the gospel, so that the need underneath the need can be met in Christ. We are about both of those things, and we’re not going to fudge on either one. 

That’s why I’m super thankful for Raymond Moorhouse here. If you guys haven’t met him yet, he’s the outreach chaplain here at Emmaus, and he does a lot of work among the population of Redlands with homelessness, and meeting physical needs. And, he thinks really well about it, too. If you haven’t had a conversation with him, I would encourage you to do it. But also, the helping humans workshops that he does, it fleshes that out for us biblically, because we often don’t know what to do in the physical realm, right? It’s either bleeding heart, give people a sack lunch, or on the other hand, it’s like … it’s too messy, they want to be there, we’re not going to do anything, we’re going to leave them alone. 

I think the gospel calls us to a third way. And so, we at Emmaus church are thinking through, praying through, getting input into how we flesh out for us, how we become a word and deed church, and continue to be a word and deed church. 

So, this being before doing produces word and deed … finally … which results in holistic healing.

III. …WHICH RESULTS IN HOLISTIC HEALING (vv40-45)

 Now, are you seeing the trajectory of your day? You begin with Abba Father, this is who I am, then as you go throughout your day, you’re going throughout it as word and deed people. And, ultimately, what we see, is by God’s grace, we’re joining God in his work, and it results in holistic healing. It results in a comprehensive salvation. 

Look at verses 40-42 … And a leper came to him, imploring him, and kneeling said to him, “If you will, you can make me clean.” Moved with pity, he stretched out his hand and touched him and said to him, “I will; be clean.” And immediately the leprosy left him, and he was made clean. Leprosy had all of life implications. Leprosy was not just a physical issue, it was physical, social, and spiritual. It meant that if you had leprosy, you were an outcast, you were a social pariah. It meant that you had to stay in a desolate place without touch, and it meant that if a leper came near to an inhabited place, what they would hear is cries of people crying out … unclean! Unclean! They couldn’t be touched. 

Imagine you, this afternoon, head over to Citrus Plaza, and as you’re walking through the food court, everyone starts crying out .... unclean! And, they part the way for you, and no one will touch you. Imagine the reality of that in life, everywhere you went. If someone who was not lepers came into contact with a leper, he or she was now unclean. In fact, there’s a rabinical writing of the time that says, if a leper stands under a tree and a clean person passes under the shadow of the tree, the clean is made unclean. And then, the person who passes under the shadow of the tree is now ceremonially unclean, and they have to go through a whole ritualistic ceremony to become clean again, so they can engage their community, and engage in worship. 

And, of course, for the leper, it meant no temple worship. They couldn’t enter the temple as unclean people. See, what’s going on here is not just physical healing, but a comprehensive, holistic salvation. And, you and I are that leper. You and I need comprehensive, holistic salvation, and when we place our faith in Jesus and we find the spirit of sonship that cries Abba, Father in us, from there we join God in his work to proclaim this good news, this holistic salvation in word and in deed. 

What may be lost on us, as well, as we read this text, is that the leper, here, has made a mad dash for life. The leper comes to Jesus in an inhabited place, it seems, and bows to Jesus, throws himself at the feet of Jesus. He breaks all the laws, all the societal norms that lepers were supposed to adhere to, and throws himself completely upon Jesus’ mercy. Notice he says … if you will … make me clean. If you will, make me clean. He doesn’t say, you have to make me clean, I’ve risked everything for you. Don’t you see what I’ve done? Don’t you see what I’ve risked to come into your presence in the midst of this inhabited place? I could be beaten, I could be killed for breaking all of these social taboos and laws. Here I am, at your feet, Jesus. Don’t you see what I’ve done? You have to heal me. 

Notice there’s none of that in the language. He says, if you will. This is not a conditional appeal based upon his own work. He doesn’t say, look what I’ve done, look how I’ve risked for you. He drops all his conditions, and he says, if you are the authority - as we looked at last week, the author of life - if that is you, I give up all my rights, and place my life at your mercy, and I do it gladly, and I do it willingly. 

See, if the leper were Greek or Roman, he would have said, if you will, you can make me well. But he doesn’t. He says, if you will, you can make me clean. Clean physically, clean to my community, clean before God. And, Jesus gives it to him. Verse 41 says he was … moved with pity … some versions say, moved with compassion. Now, this reality doesn’t happen if he is not living out of Abba, Father. Think about how inconvenient this is. And, how do we view people who have needs in our midst? In the midst of our busy days, are people simply an interruption? We can’t meet everyone’s need, that is true. But, we all have people that are right before us, in our spheres of work and our spheres of influence, in our neighborhoods. We have people right in front of us, that God says are placed there by him, Acts 17:26, are placed there by him to move towards God. 

We can’t do everything, but we are called to be moved for compassion for those who are right in front of us, all of us. But, if we’re not living out of Abba, Father it’s simply an interruption to what is fast and famous.  This is our call as God’s people. Our world, our community - and we know this ourselves - desperately needs holistic healing. See, this is why Jesus reaches out, and he touches him. Did you catch that? The untouchable is touched by the author of life. The untouched is touched. Did he have to do that to heal? No, we see that Jesus heals in many different ways. He can heal with a command, or he can heal with a thought at times. Jesus touches him, because his soul is starving for it, because he was made for God and deep community, and what he’s known is isolation and abandonment, and desolate places. Jesus is giving holistic salvation the leper needs, and that you and I need.

Finally, let’s look at the rest of the text, verses 43-45, to see clearly what’s happening … And Jesus sternly charged him and sent him away at once, and said to him, “See that you say nothing to anyone, but go, show yourself to the priest and offer for your cleansing what Moses commanded, for a proof to them.” But he went out and began to talk freely about it, and to spread the news, so that Jesus could no longer openly enter a town, but was out in desolate places, and people were coming to him from every quarter.” … Up to this point in history, whenever something unclean came in contact with something clean, what was clean was defiled. What was clean, was made unclean. But, here, Jesus tells the leper to go to the priest, so he can certify your healing and declare publicly what is now true of you, that you are clean. 

For the first time in history, the clean touches the unclean, and the unclean is made clean. The unclean is made well. And, by Jesus not going to the priest for ceremonial washing after touching the leper, he’s declaring, I am cleanliness. I am what cleanses the defiled. I am savior. No matter what you’ve done, or what’s been done to you, if you come to me, and I touch you, you will be made clean. That is the kingdom that Jesus ushered in, in his incarnation, and what we see lived out in his ministry. 

Now, Jesus tells the leper, don’t tell anyone what I did. But, the leper does exactly what Jesus says not to. He does the exact opposite. And, notice the result … the leper and Jesus have exchanged places. The leper who used to have to be in desolate places now goes into the city, and Jesus who was in the city among the inhabited, now goes into the desolate places, and this foreshadows for us how the uncleaner made clean. In Hebrews 13:12, we’re told that Jesus was crucified outside the gate. He was crucified in the desolate places, taken out of the place of the leper, he becomes unclean so that we can become forever clean, taken out to the place of the leper, he becomes unclean, so that we can become clean.

This foreshadows for us the ultimate work of the cross. See, and this is where this sort of transformational cycle happens, that at the foot of the cross, we receive the spirit of sonship that cries out Abba, Father. That reality leads us into word and deed living, where we join in God’s work to see holistic healing come, which brings us back, again, to the foot of the cross. This is kingdom living for the life of the believer.

Do you want this prayer, this communion with the Father, this word and deed life that the kingdom produces? Here, is where it begins, knowing that Jesus has substituted himself for you, and for me. See, when Peter tells Jesus, everyone is looking for you, this was far truer than he knew. One of the realities that we know as God’s people, is that whether people realize it or not, everyone is looking for him. And, this morning, we are invited, and every one of you here is invited to place your faith, whether it’s for the first time, or whether it’s to renew your faith and once again place your faith in the one who went to desolate places for you, so that we could be made clean. It begins there, again, and the Lord invites us to the foot of the cross. Let’s pray.

Jesus, 

We are grateful for this beautiful reality. Lord, we are people who are unclean in and of our own deeds. Lord, we ask this morning that your Spirit would awaken us to our desperate need for you. Lord, that we would once again live into the reality of the sonship we have, and that our spirits would cry out Abba, Father, as we come, once again, to the table and remember and live into, and receive the grace of the cross of Jesus Christ. Lord, would you make Emmaus church, a people who are rooted in Abba, Father, who live out the word and deed reality of the kingdom, so that we can see holistic salvation, complete salvation come to the Inland Empire. Lord, it is far more work than we can do, but at the end of the day it is not our work, it is yours. And Lord, we rest in that truth and all the complexity that is this world, and the work of seeing your kingdom come to bear in this world, Lord, may we never lose sight of the cross of Christ, and our good Father, our Abba, Father, as we go about our work. We ask this, Lord, in Jesus’ name, Amen.

Kingdom Authority-Full Sermon Transcript

Link to Blog

PASTOR: FORREST SHORT

SCRIPTURE READING

“And they went into Capernaum, and immediately on the Sabbath he entered the synagogue and was teaching. And they were astonished at his teaching, for he taught them as one who had authority, and not as the scribes. And immediately there was in their synagogue a man with an unclean spirit. And he cried out, “What have you to do with us, Jesus of Nazareth? Have you come to destroy us? I know who you are—the Holy One of God.” But Jesus rebuked him, saying, “Be silent, and come out of him!” And the unclean spirit, convulsing him and crying out with a loud voice, came out of him. And they were all amazed, so that they questioned among themselves, saying, “What is this? A new teaching with authority! He commands even the unclean spirits, and they obey him.” And at once his fame spread everywhere throughout all the surrounding region of Galilee. And immediately he left the synagogue and entered the house of Simon and Andrew, with James and John. Now Simon’s mother-in-law lay ill with a fever, and immediately they told him about her. And he came and took her by the hand and lifted her up, and the fever left her, and she began to serve them. That evening at sundown they brought to him all who were sick or oppressed by demons. And the whole city was gathered together at the door. And he healed many who were sick with various diseases, and cast out many demons. And he would not permit the demons to speak, because they knew him.”

—Mark 1:21–34 ESV

INTRO (v21)

My name is Forrest, I’m one of the pastors here, and it is great to be with you on this Father’s Day. We are in our third week in a series on the book of Mark that we’ll be journeying in throughout the summer. And, last week we looked at the reality of the kingdom, that this kingdom is at hand, but that this kingdom is now, and not yet. That, it is here, it is within reach, and we get glimpses of it and tastes of it, and the reality of the kingdom breaks into our lives in different ways, but it is not yet. We have not yet experienced it in its fullness.

And so, from there, to this text this morning - starting at verse 21 - we see what that kingdom looks like. We see how that kingdom authority comes to bear in our lives, and how it’s fleshed out. So, we want to look first at the setting. This is a 24 hour period, actually from verse 21 through the end of the chapter. This is a 24 hour period, and we’re going to spend the next two weeks looking at this 24 hours, this day in the life of Jesus. But, there are four words in verse 21 that I think will give us our setting for the day, and our setting for our text this morning.

The first word is Capernaum. So, we see there in verse 21 … And they went into Capernaum, and immediately on the Sabbath he entered the synagogue and was teaching … So, Capernaum was on the northwest shore of the Sea of Galilee. All of this is taking place in the book of Mark all the way up to chapter 8, in this region of Galilee. And, Capernaum was a city of, it seems like, about 1500 people on the northwest shore of the sea of Galilee. Jesus grew up a few miles southwest of Galilee in a little town called Nazareth. But, Capernaum can be thought of as Jesus’ homebase during his few short years of ministry. In fact, in one point in the book of Mark, it says that Jesus went home there, was most likely the home of Simon Peter. But, it was essentially his base for the few years of public ministry that Jesus was engaged in.

And then, we see sabbath. He comes into Capernaum on the sabbath. Now,  sabbath was the Jewish day for rest and worship, as many of us know, that ran from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday. And, this was central to Jewish life, the whole life of the Jewish people, God’s people, revolved around this sabbath day. And, he comes to Cappernaum on the sabbath, and he goes into a synagogue. Synagogue was the hub of Jewish life. During the week, children would be educated in the synagogue and they would learn the Torah, the first five books of the Old Testament. And, they would study it, and then on the sabbath the village would come together for, essentially, a time of worship and teaching during the first part of Saturday morning.

And, they would do this in four parts. There would be prayer, then there would be the reading of the Torah, then there would be the teaching, and then there would be some kind of blessing of benediction for God’s people. So, Jesus comes into the center of Jewish life, and it says that he comes into it and he is teaching. Now, the synagogue gathering was very teaching-focused. That took up the majority of the time of worship. And, there was a ruler, normally, in towns where there was a synagogue, there was a ruler who oversaw the synagogue, but it was volunteer, he wasn’t paid, and he may or may not be someone who taught in the synagogue. So, he wasn’t necessarily a teacher. So, what would happen, often, is that visiting rabbis would come through, and these visiting rabbis would teach in the synagogue.

So, this is what Jesus is doing. He’s coming to the center of God’s people, the hub of the life of God’s people to begin his public ministry. So, that’s the setting. And, what we’re going to see as it unfolds, as we see what happens in that setting, is authority is the umbrella under which the rest of this chapter unfolds. And, what we’re going to see first, is there is an undeniable authority.

I. AN UNDENIABLE AUTHORITY (vv22-28)

So, it comes into this setting, and in verse 22 it says … And they were astonished at his teaching, for he taught them as one who had authority, and not as the scribes. And immediately there was in their synagogue a man with an unclean spirit. And he cried out … Now, as we look at that, something may pop out to you like it did to me. On one hand, you have teaching that is so powerful, that is so authoritative that they are - it says - astonished at what they’re hearing. They’re astonished at his teaching. On the other hand, we’re not told anything about what he actually teaches. Do you notice that? They don’t unpack the content of his teaching. They don’t tell us anything about how impressive it was, or brilliant, or eloquent, or persuasive. It’s not even mentioned. You would think if the teaching is that authoritative, well tell me what he’s teaching! Cause, I want that content.

Instead, the text moves on immediately to the man with the unclean spirit. Which, is an impressive event - no doubt - but, at first glance, it’s not clear how this has anything to do with his teaching. Please, unpack his teaching for me. But, they’re saying the authority - it’s not that his content was not authoritative - it was - it’s just that the authority was not located in the content itself. Notice it says he … had authority, and not as the scribes … and, this sort of juxtaposition of Christ’s teaching and the scribes, helps bring to the surface a little bit for us what’s going on here.

The scribes were scholars. They were experts in the Torah, the first five books of the Old Testament. I mean, they had the first five books memorized. They had spent decades studying. And, what they would do often, is their form of teaching would be to quote other rabbis as sort of the basis for their authority. So, in other words, they teach this content, and then they would say … Rabbi so-and-so, I learned this from them … or, quote another rabbi, to give their teaching some authority, some power. Which, to be honest, is usually a means of becoming an impressive teacher, right? If we’re going to be an impressive teacher, you teach from your area of expertise. Perhaps you point others to your years of study, your experience and how you came to expertise in this particular area. You might even point to … I studied under this particular person who was greatly influential and mentored me. Those are all good things. But, that’s the authority that the scribes had, and they’re saying … Jesus’ authority is different. This is not the same kind of authority that we usually hear, even from perhaps the best teachers that come through.

And, the difference is found in this word authority

Authority (exousia) = rule, power, dominion

In Greek, it’s the word exousia, and it’s not authority in an academic sense. It means rule, it means power, it means dominion. Notice the breadth of this authority. And, this is why, rather than expanding on these specifics of Jesus’ teaching, the narrative goes immediately to the man with the unclean spirit. Look at what happens starting in verse 23 … And immediately there was in their synagogue a man with an unclean spirit. And he cried out, “What have you to do with us, Jesus of Nazareth? Have you come to destroy us? I know who you are—the Holy One of God.” But Jesus rebuked him, saying, “Be silent, and come out of him!” And the unclean spirit, convulsing him and crying out with a loud voice, came out of him. And they were all amazed, so that they questioned among themselves, saying, “What is this? … [again] … A new teaching with authority! [exousia] ... He commands even the unclean spirits, and they obey him.”

Mark is demonstrating that this is someone with real power. Notice that commanding the demon wasn’t done with hocus-pocus, or, you know, Harry Potter-type stuff, however we think of exorcisms or someone coming and having power over a demon. None of those things are happening here. All that happens is Jesus simply speaks, be silent, and come out of him. And, the man is delivered. The unclean spirit obeys.

What kind of authority is this? This is authority those in the synagogue have never seen. This isn’t, like, the typical authority of the scribes. This is a different kind of authority. And, I think the idea even underneath this power and dominion is that he teaches out of the original. In other words, as an author teaches. Right? We can talk about - speaking of Harry Potter - we can talk about Harry Potter all day, but if you go to the author, they’re going to be able to speak on it with a kind of authority that you and I cannot. That’s what’s happening here. The author of all creation is speaking out of that kind of authority. There is nothing in this world that is not subjecting him. And, while they cannot articulate it, they’re experiencing that kind of authority.

Now, this is the authority of an author, the one who we go all the way back to creation, Christ is creating. So, what are the implications, then, of this new authority? What are the implications, if this is truly an authority? That’s great, that’s powerful, but how does that come to bear in our life? What does that mean for us on a day to day basis?

So, the first thing we see is an undeniable authority, which leads to a healing authority.

II. A HEALING AUTHORITY (vv29-34)
We see this in verses 29 through 34 … And immediately he left the synagogue and entered the house of Simon and Andrew, with James and John … remember, he’s just called them earlier in the chapter … Now Simon’s mother-in-law lay ill with a fever, and immediately they told him about her. And he came and took her by the hand and lifted her up, and the fever left her, and she began to serve them … The fever left her. He lifted her up. This is healing authority.

So, this is not just a new and different teaching. The authority doesn’t just come because he’s bringing a different aspect of teaching, though he is doing that. This authority expresses itself in healing, and in mending, and in renewing. This is the reality of the kingdom come to bear in our lives, in the lives of those who are his people. It is an authority that brings healing. That is what happens as the kingdom is fleshed out, is that the brokenness, it is the balm for brokenness. And, this is not just spiritual, though it does - a little later, I think it’s in the next chapter where it says he has the same authority, power - exousia - to forgive sins. It also comes to bear in the physical. This is not just spiritual healing, it’s healing that comes into his creation, into what is being created, his good creation. It’s physical, as well.

And, we can find great hope in this. I think one of the ways Christianity distinguishes itself from all other religious systems, is that it says stuff matters. The physical matters, or as people have put it in the past, matter matters. The physical is not just something to be done away with. And, this thinking - which, honestly, the roots of it kind of go back to something called gnosticism, which was really the first real heresy to gain traction in the early church and challenge the doctrine of the early church. It essentially said that material stuff is evil, it’s not good, and so it’s to be done away with. And so, we gain this spiritual sort of gnosis, secret knowledge to overcome and do away with this evil. I’m reducing it quite a bit, but that’s the idea there. It said that physical stuff doesn’t matter.

And, somehow, this has crept its way into the thinking of the church. That, somehow, we believe - I’ve heard it said in the church, I’ve had people tell me - oh, it doesn’t matter, it’s all going to burn in the end. Well, guess what? It’s not. It’s not all going to burn in the end. That’s not what scripture teaches. I mean, the reality is, what we do day to day life in the physical, it matters. That, in some grand, mysterious, beautiful way, that the work we engage in now, to join God, and seeing this healing happen, that as we join him, that there is - in some sense - this carries over, in some way, into the new creation. We don’t have all the lines and boundaries of that, but we do know that God is redeeming all things, and as we join him in his work of doing the physical things, that it matters.

The idea that the world will be done away with, that we’ll somehow, one day, be left floating away into this disembodied spiritual reality, is just not in scripture. It’s just not biblical, which is why Jesus’ authority is not just limited to his teaching, but it comes to bear in the physical realm. It comes to bear in healing.

C.S. Lewis has a good quote on this …

There is no good trying to be more spiritual than God. God never meant man to be a purely spiritual creature. That is why He uses material things like bread and wine to put the new life into us. We may think this rather crude and unspiritual. God does not: …He likes matter. He invented it.”

—C.S. Lewis

That’s great, isn’t it? He likes matter. He invented it. It’s good, it’s creation, and good. Yes, it’s been marred by the Fall and our sinfulness and the result of sin is brokenness that all of us experience. But, this matter matters. This is why there’s physical healing as he begins his ministry. He goes right to the physical. Matter is so important to God that his kingdom is marked, and his authority is marked by healing sick bodies. The death hear, the blind see, the lame walk, other gospels tell us very explicitly. We’re told in scripture to take care of the widow and the orphan, these very physical, broken realities that we’re to engage.

Sin has broken in to this world, though, and it’s left the world broken, right? And, we’re all touched by this. We know that. Author Zach Eswine includes these physical, broken realities that we experience, in something he calls inconsolable things. And, we all live with the measure, in the now and the not yet, or inconsolable things, and here’s what he says …

““Inconsolable things” are the sins and miseries that will not be eradicated until heaven comes home, the things that only Jesus, and no one of us, can overcome. We cannot expect to change what Jesus has left unfixed for the moment. The presence of inconsolable things does not mean the absence of Jesus’ power, however. Rather, it establishes the context for it. There in the midst of what is inconsolable to us, the true unique nature and quality of Jesus’s power shows itself to be unlike any other power we have seen.”

—Zack Eswine

That’s what they see in the synagogue. This authority, this healing authority. Who does this? We’ve never met anyone like him. And, it is true today. We can say the same thing, that Jesus, in the midst of the inconsolable things of life, has healing power that comes to bear in our lives. And, while not everything will be fixed here and now, it is coming one day. And, he is present with us here and now, in the midst of the inconsolable things.

So, is Jesus’ authority demonstrated in the midst of inconsolable things? We all have them, we can all name those things, can’t we? I’m 47, which for some of you, that’s really old. For my children, apparently, who call me an old man now, that’s like … dad has left, and old man has replaced him. I’m feeling my body do things it's never done. I’ve always been active, so I spent a half day, literally 6 months ago on a chain saw, and my shoulder is now just recovering, from four hours of a chain saw. I’ve run since I was in high school, and I’m having some crazy achilles tendonitis, that I’m limping for, like, three days every time I run. So, I’m not running anymore. So, I started riding a bike, but I kept lifting weights, and then last Friday I’m with my daughter lifting weights, and I’m doing deadlifts, and I went to pick it up, and my back went - pop! And, I went down to my knees and my daughter was like … what’s wrong with you!? I’m like, I can’t stand up, honey. Seriously. So, I walked out of the gym visibly injured, and the lady at the front door, she had the audacity to say ... I hope you had a good workout. Do you see me? No, I didn’t have a good workout. I want my $10 a month back.

This is the reality of inconsolable things. You know, I’ve probably played my last game of touch football in the park, because things start snapping and popping at my age when you try to go do that stuff. These things are true, and they’re not changing. I’m not going to go back to the physical way that I was at 25 years old - that’s not happening. That’s kind of a lighthearted thing, some of us have experienced inconsolable things and ways that, at times, feel unbearable.

So, how is Jesus’ authority demonstrated in the midst of inconsolable things? There’s a lot of debate in the church, oftentimes it’s between different camps. Like, if God’s kingdom is to come to bear now, then it’s God’s desire for everyone to be healed, 100% of the time. And so, it’s faith and sin are the only reasons that people aren’t healed. But, that has issues, because what do you do with … precious in the eyes of the Lord are the death of his saints … right? So, what we’re battling around is this reality of the now and the not yet.So, how does this healing authority come to bear in our lives, in the midst of inconsolable things?

First, there is a time coming - which goes back to the now and the not yet - when all sin will be done away with, and brokenness in every form will be healed. Where, everything that is wrong will be made right, and in some sense, all the wrongs of this world will be undone. I don’t know how, but Jesus in his healing authority will do that. So, it comes to bear in the now and not yet, that one day all things will be made right.

Second, his healing authority comes to bear in this … I think we should ask God for healing. And, I don’t just mean physical, bodily healing, though I do include that. We should ask God for healing, we should look for it. We should be grateful for it when he gives it, because I believe at times, in his authority and his wisdom, he gives it. So, let’s ask for it, and let’s be grateful when he gives it, because in doing so, we’re joining with Jesus and his prayer for the kingdom of God to come to earth, for it to be on earth as it is in heaven. And, we trust his wisdom in the midst of inconsolable things, as we ask for what seems best to us in the midst of it, informed by his word.

And, third, in the midst of inconsolable things, his healing power comes to bear in that the broken aspects of our lives are not defeats. Now, how do I turn to that? What do I turn to for the proof of that? Romans 8:35-39, and it’s all throughout scripture, but I think it really focuses on where our hope lines in the midst of things that feel like defeats …

“Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? … [listen to these inconsolable things] … Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or danger, or sword? As it is written,

“For your sake we are being killed all the day long;

we are regarded as sheep to be slaughtered.”

No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us. For I am sure that neither death nor life, nor angels nor rulers, nor things present nor things to come, nor powers, nor height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.”

—Romans 8:35-39 ESV

That’s how his healing authority comes to bear. There is no power, no ruler that is greater, that can undermine his authority, and his healing power that comes to bear in your life, his love for you is unshakeable. And so, in the midst of inconsolable things, where we can’t fix them, the physical brokenness of this world is coming to bear, the sinfulness of our own hearts is coming to bear in our lives, and is having ripple effects that we cannot seem to fix. We’re reminded that even in these things, we are more than conquerors. That, his love for us in these things is unshakeable, and it is bringing about our good, whether we can see it, or not. See, there are things in life that we can neither change nor soothe, but Jesus can, and Jesus does. And, we can trust him because of his healing authority.

So, his healing authority comes to bear in our life, but also we see - I think - another aspect. There’s much overlap here, but we also see his resurrecting authority.

III. A RESURRECTING AUTHORITY (vv30-31)

Inverses 30 and 31 …  Now Simon’s mother-in-law lay ill with a fever, and immediately they told him about her. And he came and took her by the hand and lifted her up, and the fever left her, and she began to serve them … Now, we don’t know what happens to the demon-oppressed man, but we do know what happens to Simon’s mother-in-law. We see that she had this fever, and that Jesus literally lifted her up. Literally translated, he raised her. It means that he raised her. Everywhere in the book of Mark where someone is healed, this same word is used. In the next chapter, chapter 2, the paralytic is raised. In Mark chapter 5, Jairus’ daughter is raised. A boy with an unclean spirit is raised in Mark 9. Blind Bartimaeus, the beggar, in Mark 10. The same word is used in all of these instances, that they are raised. It’s the idea that they are going from death to life. The same word is used to describe Jesus being raised, his resurrection.

See, when Jesus demonstrates his undeniable authority of the kingdom, it doesn’t subjugate as our kingdoms of this world do. It doesn’t destroy as the kings of this world tend to do. It resurrects, it revives, it brings life. And, that’s what we see in Simon’s mother-in-law. Fever at that time was life threatening. It wasn’t like today, where you pop a couple pills and monitor it a little bit, and put a rag on your head. It was life threatening, it was no small thing. Notice what she does, though, what this resurrection looks like in the life of his people. When she is raised, when she is lifted up, it says at the end of verse 31 … and she began to serve them … Does that strike you?

We don’t know how sick she was, but it was bad enough that they told Jesus about it. She’s in bed, with fever, potentially deathbed. She goes from that, to immediately serving. Do you see the holistic reality of Jesus’ healing and resurrection life? It’s holistic. She didn’t just go about her own business. She didn’t just do what she wanted to do. She didn’t just think like I do when my back is out, about all the things that I could be doing, but I can’t because I can’t stand up straight. She didn’t go do those things. She immediately began to serve. She began to show hospitality, generosity. She began to serve the one with resurrecting authority in her midst, and in a sense, build this life-giving community right where she was.

When Jesus’ authority comes to bear in our lives, it gives us a new set of priorities. We’re drawn to hospitality, generosity, to meeting the needs of others before ourselves. These things are so unnatural to us, right? We, in life, tend to think life is about dominating. I use the example, oftentimes, of pro-sports. Our high school football coach used to say, when you score a touchdown, act like you’ve been there before. I think we’ve kind of lost that, right? Now we score a touchdown, and we’re flexing … I mean, I don’t score any touchdowns. They score a touchdown. They dunk on people - I still do that - not really, I don’t. They dunk on people, and what do they do? They stand over them and flex, right? They dominate. They want you to know that I have subjected you, that this life of Jesus, this rule of the kingdom is very different.

We get a new set of priorities, as Jesus raises us from death to life. We’re drawn to these things, and not because the resurrection has to be paid back. How do you pay back death to life? You can’t, you don’t. It’s not to pay anything back, it’s because it’s what we desire to do, because we have before us what our Savior has done for us. We begin to serve in the midst of inconsolable things because Christ has served us in the midst of our inconsolable things. And, that overflows into the life of one another, and the life of Emmaus church should be overflowing to the life of those that are outside of us. That’s the authority of the kingdom, and the resurrection of the kingdom.

But, here’s what’s crucial: In the midst of the inconsolable things of life, where Jesus has resurrected us, and we turn and we look, and we recognize the unbelievable amount of inconsolable things, we can begin to serve in ways that are less than God-honoring, and perhaps even less than effective. In the midst of the inconsolable things of life, we have to distinguish between busyness, and service. Because, busyness often masquerades as service. We can look like servants, we can look really busy, and actually not be serving the way we’re called to. I think immediately, of Mary and Martha in Luke 10:38-42 …

“Now as they went on their way, Jesus entered a village. And a woman named Martha welcomed him into her house. And she had a sister called Mary, who sat at the Lord's feet and listened to his teaching. But Martha was distracted with much serving. And she went up to him and said, “Lord, do you not care that my sister has left me to serve alone? Tell her then to help me.” But the Lord answered her, “Martha, Martha, you are anxious and troubled about many things, but one thing is necessary. Mary has chosen the good portion, which will not be taken away from her.”

—Luke 10:38-42 ESV

So, here is Martha, probably looking to all appearances, a gracious servant. But, Jesus discerned differently, and gives her a gentle rebuke in the midst of it. He saw that Martha’s apparent service was actually anxious busyness. Anyone else ever feel that? Man, how often do I trade true, Christ honoring service for anxious busyness. I’m guilty.

I recently read a description of a busy pastor, but I think it can be applied to busy Christians, in general. It said that, actually, those terms should not go with one another. Because, she said, a busy Christian is a blasphemous anxiety to do God’s work for him. This anxious busyness is a blasphemous desire to do God’s work for him. And, to kind of dig down on this, we go about our busyness rather than service, I think, for a couple reasons.


Now, I have to give a nod, too. Sometimes we look around at the inconsolable things in the world, and we become apathetic, because there’s just so much, we don’t even know what to do. And, that undermines our service. But, to busyness, specifically, which I think - culturally - the more we grow in the ability to office wherever we are, and to have access to anything and everything all the time, I think we’re more prone to anxious busyness, rather than just apathy, though I think both of them come to bear.

We go about busyness rather than service, I think, because of two main reasons. One, we become busy in our vanity. And, it may be hidden from us. Unless we’re asking the Lord to search us, we just begin operating in this way. We live in a culture where overflowing schedules and frantic pacing communicates significance, right? We say, oh look at that person. Man, they’re so busy. They’re just overwhelmed, they just can’t get it done. And, what’s underneath that a lot of times is just a little bit of, kind of, admiration and awe, right? Man, they just work so hard. And, hard work is biblical. Don’t get me wrong, we should be hard workers, and if we’re going to serve well, it’s going to mean hard work. So, busyness and hard work are not synonyms, right? Busyness is this anxious busyness that does not honor the Lord.

So, when we go by a restaurant and we see a line outside, and we see the waiters and waitresses and chefs running around like chickens with their heads cut off, we go, man, that’s probably a good place to eat. Look at the line, right? When you go by Caroline’s Cafe, and everyone’ sitting outside at noon waiting for that gigantic cinnamon bun or whatever it is … coffee cake? Sorry. Man, I can’t be in Redlands and not know that. Coffee cake! Right? That’s, like, twice the size of my head. Everyone’s waiting for that. We assume, immediately, that’s a place of significance, because there’s activity. But, activity - props to the coffee cake - it doesn’t necessarily mean that what’s happening there is significant.


So, what we do if frantic pacing and overflowing schedules communicate importance, in my vanity, I’m tempted to follow suit, because it communicates, somehow, my significance. Our lives should be full, they should not be full of anxious busyness. They should be full of service. Or, secondly, we go about busyness rather than service because of two reasons. We become busy in our laziness. Eugene Peterson says this …

“By lazily abdicating the essential work of deciding and directing, establishing values and setting goals, other people do it for us; then we find ourselves frantically, at the last minute, trying to satisfy a half dozen different demands on our time, none of which is essential to our vocation, to stave off the disaster of disappointing someone”

—Eugene Peterson


What he’s saying here, is that if we do not have a focus for our service in the midst of inconsolable things, if we are not planned out, if we do not have a goal and then work back from there on how we are going to hem in our service so that we can reach that, he’s saying, if you don’t plan your life, everyone else will plan it for you, and you will end up being an anxiously busy person rather than a servant-hearted person. See, true service is doing the right things for the right reasons, right? It’s this overflow of heart out of what Christ has done for us, out of his healing and resurrection, out of that we serve, and we work.

So, perhaps this morning, you hear that and you think … man, anxiously busy describes me. I would encourage you to dig down on what you’re doing, and why you’re doing it, and maybe ask yourself some questions. What do I desire to do? What do I really desire to do in the midst of life’s inconsolable things? What do I desire to do? What am I good at? What do I have an opportunity to do, and what do I have the character to do? That, I go in the midst of it, and it doesn’t destroy me, it doesn’t wreck me. Think about those things, and then we begin to get some banks for the river that is our life of service and response to what the Lord has done.

So, this word here for serve … it’s the word used for deacon. And, it’s used in the New Testament to describe a broad range of acts and service. It’s one of the marks of the family of God, that we are to be deaconing one another, we are to be serving one another, and this is a telltale sign of the authority of God’s kingdom coming to bear in the life of his people. That, each member serves one another cheerfully and sacrificially.

So, it’s a service that is sourced in, and an overflow of Jesus’ sacrifice for us. So, in that sense, we’re all called to be deacons. There’s the office that’s distinguished in scripture, but there is the reality of us being deacons in the midst of a world full of inconsolable things. It’s a service that’s sourced in and an overflow of Jesus’ sacrifice for us. In Matthew 20:28, Jesus said he came to serve, not to be served. Man, doesn’t that - the Jesus, the one with this authority, the author, he came to serve. He came to deacon us, to serve, not to be served.

There’s something that comes to the surface, the language of verse 26, as we bring this home … And the unclean spirit, convulsing him and crying out with a loud voice, came out of him … If you think about where else you’ve heard that, your mind would immediately go to the cross. Mark 15 describes the moment of the death of Jesus in almost the same words. In 15 verse 37, it says … and Jesus uttered a loud cry, and breathed his last … Literally means, there, breathed his last means his spirit was expelled. The only way Jesus would ever silence the demons and the inconsolable things of life was to be silenced, himself, for us. The way Jesus’ authority is experienced for us, is that Jesus gave up his authority. And, the authority of Christ means that those who are his can resist adding to the broken list of inconsolable things and resist hastily trying to do what only Jesus can, and instead join God in his work of healing and resurrection.

That’s the invitation for us, from this text this morning. Will we join God in this service, this deaconing of one another, overflowing to Redlands and the surrounding communities? That’s the invitation for us today, and so, we respond at Emmaus every week by coming to the table, to this very physical reality that the Lord has given us in his wisdom and his grace and his goodness, so that we can taste and touch and smell and experience this reality of the kingdom that comes to bear in the midst of matter, in the midst of this physical world.

And so, we come and as we receive it together, we experience grace. God meets us in this meal, and we once again - I would challenge us this morning - let’s come to the table, as we come once again, let’s coming saying, we gladly and willfully submit ourselves to your authority, that brings healing and resurrection. Let’s pray …

Jesus,

We are thankful for the body and blood of Christ. Lord, you came to serve. That is a mind boggling thing, that the one who created all would humble himself and take on flesh, come in the midst of this physical reality to bring healing and resurrection. Lord, to weave redemption throughout our work, God, what a beautiful thing that is. I prayed this morning for all of us who may be in the midst of anxious busyness rather than true service, centered upon you. Lord, would you remind us that there are things in this life that we cannot fix, that we cannot soothe. But, Lord, there is nothing like that in this world that you cannot fix, or you cannot sooth. Lord, I pray this morning we would once again come to you, and willfully and gladly submit ourselves to your authority, that you might raise us, again, to life so that the world may know that Christ has come, as we serve one another and serve the world around us. We thank you, in Jesus’ name, amen.


The Call to Follow-Full Sermon Transcript

Link to Blog

PASTOR: FORREST SHORT

SCRIPTURE READING

“Now after John was arrested, Jesus came into Galilee, proclaiming the gospel of God, and saying, “The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand; repent and believe in the gospel.” Passing alongside the Sea of Galilee, he saw Simon and Andrew the brother of Simon casting a net into the sea, for they were fishermen. And Jesus said to them, “Follow me, and I will make you become fishers of men.” And immediately they left their nets and followed him. And going on a little farther, he saw James the son of Zebedee and John his brother, who were in their boat mending the nets. And immediately he called them, and they left their father Zebedee in the boat with the hired servants and followed him.”

—Mark 1:14–20 ESV

INTRO
Well, good morning. My name’s Forrest, and I’m one of the pastors here, and as always, it’s good to be with you. Man, it’s been a good morning already, hasn’t it? The music team, I looked over on that third song they were doing - which is an incredible version. My wife’s crying, she’s like … what’s happening right now? This is incredible! They did a great job, didn’t they? Leading us in singing this morning. I’m grateful for that.

See if any of this sounds familiar to you. You have a really good friend that, perhaps, this friend is single and you value the relationship, and this friend comes to you and tells you, I’ve met someone. And, your first thought is not rejoicing, but your first thought is how it’s going to affect you. It’s going to affect how your relationship has played out. It’s going to affect the time that you have together. Or, let’s say you have a teacher, your kid’s in school, your child has a teacher that you love, and that teacher announces that they’re pregnant, and you immediately don’t think … oh, how great, a new life is coming into the home. You think … they better have thought through who the substitute is, cause we’re not going to suffer for this. Or, maybe you’ve invited some friends for an evening out, and just before you are headed out, you get a phone call, and one of them is sick and they’re not going to make it. And, rather than in the moment, really, feeling bad for them and perhaps praying for them, you immediately think … what are we going to do now? These people are lame. She couldn’t have thrown up some other time? Why does she have to do it now?

What this reveals to us, and I think we can all identify with this on a different level. In moments where, perhaps, we should be rejoicing at some good news that we’re receiving, we immediately think about how it’s going to affect us. It reveals to us something that I think our text is addressing. It reveals to us that we are all prone to a kingdom of self. We are all prone to think about self first, and think about self foremost, which is why we do that in the midst of good news. And, what we see here in the book of Mark - this is our second week in the book of Mark, which is our summer series - and, we come to the first words of Jesus in the book of Mark, the first words of Jesus there in verse 15 … the time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand; repent and believe the gospel …

So, this is a summary that Mark is laying out for us, of the message of Christ. So, we’re going to spend some time unpacking that this morning, because just as this last week and the connections that were made to Isaiah sets up the rest of the book of Mark, so does this proclamation. We need to understand what’s being said here, because this is foundational to what we’re going to be digging into, into Mark, throughout the summer. So, we’re going to look this morning at kingdom contrast, then we’re going to look at kingdom entrance, and then we’re going to look at kingdom life. What is the life of the kingdom and how do we live in step, and in rhythm with the life of this kingdom? So, with that, let’s pray.

Jesus,

We are thankful for your word. Lord, we’re grateful for the grace that we experience as your people who gather under your word, and we ask that your Spirit would be at work in us. Lord, we ask that we would hear clearly the call of the gospel into the life of the kingdom. And, Lord, this morning that by your grace, we would dethrone self, so that we can come under the kingship of the true king, Jesus Christ, that we might live. We ask this in Jesus’ name, amen.

I. KINGDOM CONTRAST (vv14-15)


So, kingdom contrast. Notice how this particular passage starts in verse 15 .. Now after John was arrested, Jesus came into Galilee, proclaiming the gospel of God … After John was arrested  … it’s the kind of phrase that we just kind of skip over, but Mark is very intentional here. Mark is intentionally, for us, placing two kingdoms side by side, two kingdoms that are very different. One is the kingdom of this world, the kingdom which, ultimately if you keep reading Mark and you get to Mark chapter 6, you see that his arrest leads, ultimately, to his beheading. He is beheaded by Herod. And, piecing this story together from the story in Matthew 14 and Mark chapter 6 where we get the story of Herod and John the Baptist … John the Baptist was beheaded for challenging the validity of Herod’s marriage to Herodius, his wife, who was previously married to Herod’s brother, Phillip. Are you following that? It’s a lot of drama. Sin leads to a lot of drama, by the way, and we see that here. There is a lot of drama.

And, Herod, then, ultimately has John killed after his daughter in law is dancing for him - more drama - and he’s so mesmerized with her dancing that he basically says, ask whatever you want, and I’ll give it to you. Well, she goes to Herod’s wife - her mother, Herodius - and says, what should I ask for? And, Herodius said, asks for John’s head, cause, John has come against our marriage. Ask for his head. So, she does, and though Mark tells us that Herod was sorrowful to do it, he ultimately beheads John to - if you read between the lines - you see that there is something deeper at work. He does it to save his throne, because going back on his public promise would undermine his authority as a leader, as a ruler.

So, what we see, what Mark very intentionally wants us to see here, is the juxtaposition of these two kingdoms. He wants us to see that this kingdom - the one that had John the Baptist, the prophet, arrested - this kingdom is a broken kingdom. It’s a kingdom of self. And, there is no doubt that Mark intends us to make this connection. See, Herod was living for self, and in the midst of living for self, we tend to suck everyone else’s lives into the blackhole of self. Right? Everyone is there for us, to serve us, our best friends, the people we invite to dinner, our child’s teacher, they’re all there for us. That’s what the kingdom of self tells us, and that’s the way the kingdom of self works.

But, by contrast, he also means for us to see a truer and better kingdom, the kingdom of God, the kingdom not of death, but the kingdom of life - the kingdom where the true king is enthroned. It says right after John the Baptist is in prison, Jesus comes on the scene in Galilee - which, is this backwater corner of the empire, not a place where you’d think the true king would show up. Nevertheless, he does. And, he comes saying … The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand; repent and believe in the gospel … So, let’s break down what he’s saying here because, again, it matters. This is foundational to the rest of the book of Mark, and it’s important for us to grasp this morning.

So, what’s he saying there? First, he says ... the time is fulfilled … Now, it’s important to remember - and we heard a little of this last week - that, the Jews were longing for this coming kingdom, the Jewish people, God’s people were longing for this coming kingdom for centuries. It had been 400 plus years of oppression by the Babylonians, the Medo-Persians, the Greeks under Alexander, and then finally, the Roman Empire - which, in the book of Mark, that is who is ruling at that time. By this time, them, you can imagine centuries on, by this time when Jesus shows up and says … the time is fulfilled … Christians are being thrown to animals as spectacle. This is part of the reality that God’s people are living under. So, you can imagine God’s people awaiting, longing for their freedom. When is this going to happen? When is this king coming that we’ve been hearing about for centuries? We long for him, we desire him, we need him. And, Jesus shows up and he says … it’s here. He says, the time is fulfilled.

Now, there’s two words for time in Greek …

Chronos = Chronological or sequential time

Kairos = Opportune time for action

There’s chronos, which is chronological of sequential time, and that would be, you know … it’s 11:00 a.m. That’s chronos. But, there’s also kairos. Kairos is an opportune time for action. This is when your pregnant wife looks at you and says … it’s time. That’s very different than, it’s 11:00 a.m., right? You realize it is time for action. It’s a unique moment, a longed-for moment that is at hand, that is waited for, for some time. And, that’s the word that’s used here. The time is fulfilled, the kairos is fulfilled. It’s here, it’s now. So, this was - you can imagine, and we we’ll see the ripple effects of this, this was shocking, this was a shocking statement that Jesus made. It was incendiary to some people, it was an explosive proclamation that after all the centuries of longing and waiting and desiring, Jesus shows up in this little corner of the empire and says … the time is fulfilled. It’s here.

He says, the time is fulfilled and … the kingdom of God is at hand. Now, what is the kingdom of God? There’s a lot of confusion around the kingdom of God. There’s a lot of misunderstanding, I think, around the kingdom of God. But, simply put, I think we could say that the kingdom of God is God’s rulership, God’s rightful rule and reign. It’s the active, exercising of God’s power and authority. You might think of it, and it’s spoken of in Old Testament language at times, as government. It’s this righteous, perfect government with the rightful king enthroned. So, Jesus’ proclamation says, there’s a new king in power, and this king will usher in the healing of the world in a whole new way, even beyond what they realized. See, God’s people in the prophecies didn’t get everything that Jesus was coming to do. They didn’t get the degree to which he was coming to change things, to free them. Their freedom was far more than just freedom from oppression from another ruling people, another ruling empire. It’s far greater than that.

So, when he comes, he says that the kingdom of God is at hand. He says that he will usher in the healing of the world, a whole new way of life. And, this comes to bear for all of us. We know from Genesis 1, 2, and 3 that we were built to live in a perfect world where all the relationships were holy, right? Relationship to self, relationship to God, relationship to one another, relationship to his creation. All of those things were right, all of those things were good. There was flourishing in the garden.

And, in Genesis 3, what we see is that we have chosen in the midst of that perfect reality, to enthrone ourselves, rather than God. In our hearts, we’ve displaced the rightful ruler of our lives, and we’ve put ourselves there, which is why in the midst of life, we think about ourselves first. Because, we are all born into that reality. Through Adam’s sin, death came into the world, Paul tells us in Romans. And so, we all know the reality of enthroning self. And, let’s be honest … few things make us more miserable than self absorption. Few things make us more functionally miserable, day to day, create more havok in our lives, than being self absorbed.

Because, what does self absorption do? The spotlight is always on us, and so we think about everything that happens in our lives, and everything that happens in the world in relation to us. So, we’re constantly thinking, how am I feeling? How am I doing in the midst of this? How am I being treated? Am I being treated justly? Do people appreciate me? Do people love me? Do people see what I’m doing? The reason it makes us miserable is because we live before everyone else. And, I don’t know if you’ve tried that very long, but it’s horrible. Because, everyone is not going to love you the way you want them to. Everyone is not going to see you as you desire to be seen. In fact, very few people are.

And so, there are very few things that actually make us more miserable, that create more chaos, and lead to death. But, this is the reality post-Fall, in the kingdom of this world where we’ve enthroned ourselves. Eugene Peterson, in his book The Contemplative Pastor, he writes this …

“The Kingdom of self is heavily defended territory. Post-Eden Adams and Eves are willing to pay their respects to God, but they don’t want him invading their turf. Most sin, far from being a mere lapse of morals or a weak will, is an energetically and expensively erected defense against God.”

—Eugene Peterson, The Contemplative Pastor, pp. 31-32

Mark Sayer’s, in his book The Disappearing Church, he brings in to bear specifically in our increasing secular, western culture. And, this is a really good book, I’d encourage you guys to read, that just talks about our cultural moment as the church in the West, what’s happening. And, here’s what he says …

“What we are experiencing is not the eradication of God from the Western mind, but rather the enthroning of self as the greatest authority. God is increasingly relegated to the role of servant, and massager of the personal will.”

—Mark Sayers, Disappearing Church, pg. 11

This is what secularization looks like in the West. It is not a dethroning of self, it is an entrenchment in enthroning the self. But, the gospel of the kingdom is that Jesus - the true king - has come in weakness to die for us, and will come again in strength to put everything right, so that all that was lost will be restored, and even beyond restoration, to consummation. See, when we come into this kingdom, and back under the kingship of Jesus, all of the relational brokenness, the relational brokenness to self, to others, to creation, and to God, they begin to be healed. They begin to be restored. And, the dethroning of self begins to happen so that Christ takes up his rightful rule in our lives. And, it is a freeing thing, it is a beautiful thing, and it is what God desires for us. It is what God desire for Emmaus Church.

In Jesus, God’s kingdom is at hand. Now, what does he mean by that? His kingdom is at hand. It means, essentially, it is within reach. It’s kind of like on a road trip, especially you that have little ones that have been on roadtrips, right? What are they saying the whole time? Are we there yet, are we there yet … and then, as soon as you can say you’re there, as soon as you can see the city, it still may be 15 miles off, but you see the glimpse of the skyscraper, you tell the kids … we’re there. It’s within reach! We’re basically there, right?

So, to calm them down, we let them know that we’re there. Are we actually there? No, But, it is within reach. I think this is what is meant by the kingdom of God. Are we there fully? No, but it’s within reach, and we can experience glimpses of it and some of the realities of it in our lives. So, this is the kingdom contrast, these two kingdoms that Mark wants us to clearly see. One, the kingdom of self and the other, the kingdom of God - the kingdom of life.

But, how do we - in light of that, this kingdom that’s at hand, this kingdom that’s near - how do we enter that kingdom? What does it look like to come into that kingdom? Because, the truth is, if this is true … this message that Jesus has put forth, it demands a response. It’s not something that we can just be passive about, or apathetic about. It demands a response. It says that there are two kingdoms, and everyone is a part of one of those two kingdoms. But, the time has come, the time is fulfilled, the kingdom of God is at hand. What are you going to do with it?

KINGDOM ENTRANCE

So, if the kingdom is here, and the king has come, this reality demands a response. And, we’re given the response in verse 15 … repent, and believe in the gospel …  The word repent, there, is metanoia …

Repent (Gr: metanoia): meta = renew, noia = to think

Meta means to renew, noia means to think. So, we hear that oftentimes it means to change your mind, which I don’t think is bad, but I think it’s more than that. I think it’s more than simply changing your mind, though it is that. I think it is to rethink everything. It’s to rethink everything. It’s to think about the world in a whole new way. See, when we’re in the midst of kingdom of self, we’re thinking about the world in one way, and all of the world terminates in us, and on us. And so, to repent from that means we now think about the world in a whole new way, where it terminates in and upon the true King, Jesus. So, one scholar translates it this way, a paraphrase. He says … give up your agenda and trust me for mine …

Can we just say his agenda is better than ours? It’s good for us, it’s life giving, it’s good for the world. And so, what we’re hearing here in … repent and believe in the gospel … is that if your agenda and my agenda does not fit God’s good rule, then give it up. Give it up, don’t squander your time, don’t squander your money, your talent, don’t waste your brokenness and your difficulty. Don’t waste your past. Get a bigger dream than outpacing your neighbor in their material goods.

You ever feel that? I feel it. I’ve been wanting a trailer for a long time, because I haul stuff three times a year, so I need a trailer. And, my neighbor always rented one, and I felt good about that, cause I’m like, yeah, I rent a trailer too. And, you know what I immediately thought? I’ve got to buy a trailer. And, I want to go measure his to see how big it is, cause I want it to be a little bit bigger. But, that’s what we do, right, with that kingdom. My agenda is not what’s best for me. Right? When my wife asks … why’d you spend $2,000 on a trailer? And I’m like … cause I haul wood twice a year, honey. Don’t you get that? That’s what my agenda does, right? It’s a waste. Don’t waste your life. We’re hearing, repent and believe the gospel. Turn to Christ.

He says repent, and then he says … believe … Now, we think the mind, with believe - oftentimes immediately. And, it certainly includes that. It is the mind. Believing is the mind, it is believing these truths about God. But, it’s more than that. It’s not less than that, but it is more than that. I think a better understanding is trust. The idea of leaning your weight onto the true king. Trust him fully, trust this good news. He says what? Believe what? … the gospel … The word for that is the euangelion, the good news. It’s an announcement of literally joyful news. Believe, trust, turn, give up your agenda for mine, trust the joyful news that I now, here and now, have come to bring.

See, we’re all trusting something. We’re all trusting someone who we believe is bringing us good news, joyful news. When you think about your life, when I think about my life, where do we look for our source of good news? And, I’m talking about ultimate good news, the good news that drives us in life. Where do we go to for that? What are we trusting in? What are we leaning upon for what we think matters most in this life? For joy? What are we leaning on?

Jesus says, if you’re leaning on anything other than me, it is another form of trusting yourself, and enthroning yourself. So, Jesus’s invitation is to trust him. See, believing is acting on what we know to be true. It’s acting on what we know to be true, and let me just say this as an aside. One of the things I read in studying this week, is that it seems like this was part of a catechism that they would read over baptism candidates in the early centuries of the church. And, I was just reminded that that is acting on what we know to be true. And so, I want to say this … maybe you’ve been at Emmaus for a while, maybe you haven’t placed your faith in Christ, you’ve been hearing, you’ve been thinking, you’ve been processing the scriptures and what you’ve been hearing as you’ve been a part of a body. And, maybe the Lord is drawing you. And, the way to respond is through baptism. Some scholars say that this summer was actually read at the time of baptism.

What the wedding is to marriage, baptism is to the kingdom. Right? It is this way of coming in to the kingdom. It is not what saves us, but it’s our first act of obedience. We come into the kingdom. It’s the entrance into the life of the kingdom, and the waters are always open. So, at the end today, maybe when you hear the call and we respond through communion, and your desire is to respond, let me know. I’m going to be at the front, and I would love to talk to you about what that means to take that next step.

So, this call to respond, to repent and believe, is an invitation, but even more accurately, it’s a command. It’s present and perfect tense in the Greek, which means it’s an ongoing act, not a one-time event. It is not only the entrance into the kingdom, it’s the way we continue in the life of the kingdom. It’s not something that happened in your life, it’s something that should be happening in your life today, and tomorrow, and the day after. This should be something that’s normal for us. There’s a Martin Luther quote that we have up on the screen from his 95 Theses that he nailed to the Wittenberg door …

“our Lord and Master Jesus Christ…willed the entire life of believers to be one of repentance.”

—Martin Luther, Thesis 1

It’s not only entrance into the kingdom. It is the way we continue in the kingdom. See, repentance puts us in step with this life, with this true king. Ongoing repentance puts us in step with him. So, repentance looks like, on a daily basis, when we have those moments where self rises to the surface, when we hear some joyful news and the first thing we think is not, let’s rejoice with our brother and sister, let’s lament what we’re losing in the midst of this good news … that is a call to repent. To turn from self, from our agenda to Christ’s agenda for us, which is that in that moment, we would rejoice with those who are rejoicing, and we would pray with them, and we would enter into that rejoicing.

I talk often about how prayer is something that should be always below the surface, ready to pop out at any moment. I think it’s true of repentance as well. That, repentance should always be just below the surface. We should be realigning our agenda with the true king throughout our days, again, and again, and again.

So, you might be thinking at this point … how can this actually be true? This kingdom of God at hand, the true king coming and taking his rightful place among his creation, 2,000 years later and the kingdom of God is here? Really? In the midst of school shootings, and war, and injustice, which seems to be rampant and growing, the world is getting better, really? I don’t see it. How is it here?

You may have heard this phrase before. It is good to think about the kingdom of God as now, and not yet. See, sometimes Jesus talks about the kingdom of God in the present tense, and sometimes it’s in the future tense. So, which is true? Both. They’re both true. Right? It is here, but it is not yet come in fullness. All four gospels teach two comings of Jesus. Jesus, the son of God, the incarnation, and Jesus the resurrected one who will come again in power to put everything back together again, perfectly. The first coming inaugurated the king, the second coming will usher in this kingdom for all of creation.

In theology, they call this inaugurated eschatology. So, when someone asks you how was church today, you’ll be like, great, we talked about inaugurated eschatology. It’ll be impressive. But, this is the reality of the kingdom. Eschatology is the study of the future, the end times. And, an inaugurated eschatology says that in Jesus’ first coming, he inaugurated God’s future rule over all the earth. We find ourselves in the midst, in between the now and the not yet. And, the kingdom of God being at hand, in some sense, it’s as if he has dragged the aspects of future kingdom into the present. It’s like an appetizer before the main course. Right? You’re at the table, and you get the appetizer, and it’s good, but you’re really thinking about the main course. That’s what the kingdom of God is at hand, that’s what it means.

See, the kingdom of God is coming. Because the kingdom of God is coming, there’s still sickness and death. But, because the kingdom of God is here, we pray for healing, and we pray for peace. Sometimes we experience that healing. We can certainly experience that peace. But, because the kingdom of God is coming, even if we receive healing, we are at best postponing the inevitable. Because, one day we will die. The kingdom is now and not yet. The kingdom of God is coming, because it’s coming, there are 200 million - roughly - orphans in the world today. Because the kingdom of God is here, we have a church full of people who have made outsiders, insiders, who have adopted orphans into the family, into their family, into the family of God.

This is the reality of the now and not yet, and it’s a difficult place at times, but it is always a hopeful place. We don’t mourn in the midst of death the way others mourn. We do mourn, we do miss people. Jesus, himself, cried at the death of Lazarus, right? So, we do mourn, but we don’t mourn as those without hope. We have hope. Why do we have hope? Because the kingdom of God is coming. See, we get glimpses and tastes of God’s brand new world here and now, and the church is where that comes to bear.

I was thinking about that book The Disappearing Church, where he talks about the secularization of the West. And, what he talks about some, in there, is it can be tempting for us to make … I’m very much paraphrasing here … but, the idea is that it can be tempting for us in the midst of a quickly secularizing culture for the church to try to make the gospel of the kingdom palatable. We think that, somehow, what we need to do is, let’s remove some of the offense around the hot button issues so that we can make the gospel more palatable. But, what we actually do in that, is we strip the gospel of its power when we proclaim that.

See, we don’t need a more palatable gospel, we need a more powerful gospel. We need the fullness of the gospel to come to bear. We need a sharp distinction between what the world is experiencing, and what they experience when they come into the midst of us. And, if that’s not happening, if the lines become blurred there, we no longer have the powerful gospel of the kingdom.

See, our call is to bring glimpses and tastes of God’s brand new world that is coming, here, and now, in this place, on this campus, in this physical reality. Right? This kingdom is coming. It’s not disappearing somewhere else for the kingdom. That kingdom is coming, here, to earth. And so, this place, this campus, this particular church building, maybe it’s not the most important thing, but the most important thing isn’t the only thing that matters. This place matters. And, what people need to experience here, is an outpost of the kingdom of God, in the midst of a world that operates by the kingdom of self. That is our call.

And then, finally, we have Kingdom life in verses 16-20.

KINGDOM LIFE

So, we see Jesus, this is the call to follow him. And, this is unique in Jewish tradition, what’s happening here, where Jesus shows up and he sees Simon and Andrew. We’ll read it. Verse 16 … Passing alongside the Sea of Galilee, he saw Simon and Andrew the brother of Simon casting a net into the sea, for they were fishermen. And Jesus said to them, “Follow me, and I will make you become fishers of men.” And immediately they left their nets and followed him. And going on a little farther, he saw James the son of Zebedee and John his brother, who were in their boat mending the nets. And immediately he called them, and they left their father Zebedee in the boat … That is a funny picture to me … with the hired servants and followed him.

So, this is unique what’s happening here. The call to follow him is unique in Jewish tradition. rabbi’s did not choose their students. Students would have to go to the rabbis, to the teacher, and they’d have to request and essentially earn the right ot be able to follow a rabbi. But, these men are sought out and called. They are sought out and called. See, we can’t come to know the king, we can’t come to know Jesus apart from his gracious call. He must call us, and he graciously does. So, he goes to Simon - we know his name is later changed to Peter - and Andrew, and he says … follow me … And, they left.

Now, we’ve heard this so much, we kind of lose how shocking it was that they just left everything in the midst of their work. Then, he goes to James and John, and they leave as well, and it’s even more shocking because they leave their father in the boat, and I have this picture of James and John just walking away and going … we’ll see you, pops. Sorry, I know we were going to inherit the business. You got it, though, you’ve got some servants. We’re going with this guy. Right? They’re leaving family, and they’re leaving career, the two most important aspects of their life, they’re being called to give up.

Now, these days, we say goodbye to family more readily, because we are more individualistic, more career oriented. And, in that time, if the family’s business was fishing, you knew what you were going to do with your life, you were going to fish. If your family’s business was farming, you already had your career in place, you were going to farm. So, saying goodbye to their career was is felt much more deeply by us. For them, they felt both, honestly. To follow me, means … and here’s what it’s saying … we know from the gospels that they actually do come back and they’re, in some way, united with family. We do know that they continue to fish at some point. What’s really being called here is not that you just up your career, but that to follow Jesus means that knowing him because the supreme passion of your life. That’s the call to follow Him.

Now, I know culturally, that can sound a little over the top, right? Can we be a little more moderate with this stuff? I mean, that’s heavy. The supreme passion of my life? Yes. That is the call of Jesus. And, you think that’s over the top, listen to this … Jesus, in Luke 14 verse 25, now great crowds accompanied him, and he turned and said to them … if anyone comes to me and does not hate his own father, and mother, and wife, and children, and brothers, and sisters, yes and even his own life, he cannot be my disciple. Whoever does not bear his own cross and come after me cannot be my disciple … Jesus doubles down. Jesus does not make this more palatable. He brings the reality, the powerful call of the kingdom that you must die to self to come into the kingdom.

Now, what is Jesus saying there? Now, I think he’s using hyperbole, or I think maybe more accurately, a hyperbole would be intentional exaggeration to make a point, but I think what he’s doing - because we're also called, we know, to honor our father and mother, right? It’s a commandment we have - so, he’s not calling us to hate actively, he’s calling us to hate comparatively. He’s saying, follow me so fully, so completely, that all other attachments pale in comparison. That, your passion and love for me is so great that all other passions and all other loves pale in comparison.

He’s saying, don’t come to me because I’m relevant, don’t come to me because I make you happy, don’t come to me because you feel better, come to me for me. Come to me because you desire me, because you see that I am everything that you long for. And then, in that, yes. Happiness, joy, peace, it follows it. But, if we come to him for that, we’re missing the point. We’re not actually coming to him for him. He is the prize, he is the goal. And then, he says … as you come, I will make you fishers of men …

And, we’ll end with this. He doesn’t say, come learn about me and I’ll give you information. Again, that is part of the Christian life, to know things about the Lord. But, it’s more than that. He says, follow me and along the way, I will make you become. Transformation will happen so that you become fishers of men. Notice what he’s saying there. He’s taking these men, their life, and he’s saying … you are not just a fisherman, you will become fishers of men. Two different things. In the midst of being fishermen, you become fishers of men. In the midst of your job, my job, what God has called us to, we become fishers of men.

So, to follow Christ is active. It’s moving. It is discipleship that happens on mission, as we’re going. Jesus is with the disciples on mission, and he’s pointing to all of these realities of the world, and calling people to himself, and in that, they are growing and being transformed into the image of Christ. It’s not stagnant pew sitting, though you’re all sitting in pews and it’s a good thing, and I’m grateful for it. But, this is not the summation of the life of the kingdom. This is fuel for the mission. This is, in fact, it’s part of the mission as well. See, God has called us not to a stagnant call, but a process of growth and Christ-likeness.

And, to be honest - just if I can speak honestly, pastorally for one second - it’s one of our biggest weaknesses as a body. Our mission. We are people who love to study God’s word, we love theology, we love one another, and I am incredibly grateful for that. But, if we’re not careful, this becomes about information rather than transformation. God has called us to be on mission, to be moving, which means every Sunday, we should have those who do not know Christ in our midst, a watching world. Paul says that you need to think about the watching world that’s in your midst, in Corinthians. And, here’s from our GC guide. It says this …

“As a disciple, Jesus wants to align our goals and ambitions with His kingdom so they don’t destroy us. Chief among these is His kingdom ambition: to save the lost. Like these fishermen, Jesus wants to reorient our careers, talents, and personalities to serve a glorious and eternal end, transforming us into fishers of men”

—Mark GC Guide, Emmaus Church

That is a great summation of the call to follow Jesus. In biblical imagery, the sea is a place of coldness, of darkness, and chaos. It represents the kingdom of self, the kingdom of this world. And, what makes it chaotic is this self kingship, and self kingship is what makes us full of self pity. It’s a thing that erodes us psychologically and spiritually. But, have you ever come into the presence of someone who is satisfied internally, so fully emotionally, so well adjusted that they are not thinking about themselves, but they’re thinking about you?

I can think of a couple of people, here in this church, that every time I see them, I just have a gut reaction of happiness. Like, man, it’s so good to see you. Why? Because, they draw you out. They are so healthy, they’re so fixed upon the king, and have gone through the process of dethroning self by God’s grace and God’s Spirit, that they want to draw you out. They want to hear from you. They want to embrace you, to serve you emotionally and practically. It feels like coming out of the darkness. That is a fisher of men. That is someone who is so satisfied in Christ, so fixed upon Christ, that it overflows to love of neighbor. That is what it is to be a fisher of men, and that is what it means to follow Christ.

See, Jesus has already done all that he calls us to do. In calling James and John to leave their father’s boat, he had already left his Father’s throne. And, he would later be ripped from his Father’s presence on the cross. Jesus went down into death for us, so that we could die to ourselves, and come alive to Christ and his kingdom. And, that’s the call to us this morning. Let’s pray.

Jesus,

We are grateful that the King has come, that the kingdom of God is at hand. We are grateful for the truth of your word that we’ve encountered this morning. And God, we confess we are people who tend to operate by enthroning ourselves, thinking of ourselves first. But, God, we are grateful for the call to follow you, that you would make us fishers of men. And Lord, as we come to the table this morning, we respond with a yes. We see the good king, we see his life-giving kingdom, and we repent and we believe as we come to the table. We change our agenda, Lord, to take up yours, under your lordship. We lean fully upon you, trust you fully, and our joy is found in you, and you alone. Lord, may that be true of us as we come to receive the elements. Lord, I pray for those who may not know you, who may not have placed their faith in you. Would you, this morning, draw them by your Spirit. Lord, we all know the reality of living for self and how that erodes us internally, how it leads to deep bitterness and anger and frustration. Lord, may we this morning look up to you. May those who are here that have not placed their faith in you, may they look to the true king this morning. We ask this, Lord, in Jesus’ name, Amen.