Essence of Faith-Full Sermon Transcript

The Essence of Faith-Full Sermon Transcript

Link to Blog

MARK 5:21 - 5:43

PASTOR: FORREST SHORT

SCRIPTURE READING

Jesus Heals a Woman and Jairus’s Daughter 

And when Jesus had crossed again in the boat to the other side, a great crowd gathered about him, and he was beside the sea. Then came one of the rulers of the synagogue, Jairus by name, and seeing him, he fell at his feet and implored him earnestly, saying, “My little daughter is at the point of death. Come and lay your hands on her, so that she may be made well and live.” And he went with him.

And a great crowd followed him and thronged about him. And there was a woman who had had a discharge of blood for twelve years, and who had suffered much under many physicians, and had spent all that she had, and was no better but rather grew worse. She had heard the reports about Jesus and came up behind him in the crowd and touched his garment. For she said, “If I touch even his garments, I will be made well.” And immediately the flow of blood dried up, and she felt in her body that she was healed of her disease. And Jesus, perceiving in himself that power had gone out from him, immediately turned about in the crowd and said, “Who touched my garments?” And his disciples said to him, “You see the crowd pressing around you, and yet you say, ‘Who touched me?’” And he looked around to see who had done it. But the woman, knowing what had happened to her, came in fear and trembling and fell down before him and told him the whole truth. And he said to her, “Daughter, your faith has made you well; go in peace, and be healed of your disease.”

While he was still speaking, there came from the ruler’s house some who said, “Your daughter is dead. Why trouble the Teacher any further?” But overhearing what they said, Jesus said to the ruler of the synagogue, “Do not fear, only believe.” And he allowed no one to follow him except Peter and James and John the brother of James. They came to the house of the ruler of the synagogue, and Jesus saw a commotion, people weeping and wailing loudly. And when he had entered, he said to them, “Why are you making a commotion and weeping? The child is not dead but sleeping.” And they laughed at him. But he put them all outside and took the child’s father and mother and those who were with him and went in where the child was. Taking her by the hand he said to her, “Talitha cumi,” which means, “Little girl, I say to you, arise.” And immediately the girl got up and began walking (for she was twelve years of age), and they were immediately overcome with amazement. And he strictly charged them that no one should know this, and told them to give her something to eat.

—Mark 5:21-43 ESV

INTRO

Well, good morning. How is everyone? Good. Mark’s great, anyway. Good to see you guys. My name’s Forrest, I’m one of the pastors here at Emmaus. And, this morning we’re going to be looking at this text, and we’re going to be basically answering the question, what does it mean, or what does it look like, to live a life of faith? 

There’s a lot of ambiguity around the idea of faith. There’s a lot, honestly, of really bad teaching around what faith actually is. You may have experienced some of that, that faith is somehow opposed to the mind, that it’s somehow opposed to logical thinking, or that somehow if you have enough faith, you can get whatever you want from God. Sometimes known as, “name it, claim it”, or, “blab it and grab it.” We’ve heard these teachings, that if we just have enough faith, we can have whatever we want, or that if we truly believe Christ, if we truly have faith in him, then we don’t need to plan, we don’t need to think about the future, we just trust him day by day. And, it’s a very reductionistic, and quite honestly, oftentimes just a flat out wrong understanding of biblical faith. 

So, what does it look like to have a life of faith? This morning, we’re looking at the essence of faith. What is the essence of faith, or the life of faith? We’re going to walk through three aspects of faith that I think flesh out for us what the essence of faith is. First, we see desperation. Next, we see delay. Now, you might wonder, what does that have to do with faith? It actually has a lot to do with faith. And, finally, dependency. What does it look like to live dependent upon Christ? So, let’s pray and then we’re going to go right into the text. It’s rich and it’s full this morning, so I’m excited to jump in. 

Lord, thank you for your goodness. Thank you that even faith is a gift from you, because every good and perfect gift comes from the father, the father of lights, in whom there is no shadow of change, no turning. Lord, we are grateful this morning that your spirit is at work in and through your people, in and through your Word. We ask that your Spirit would open our eyes to the beauty, to the truth of this scripture, and that your Spirit would drop these truths deeply into our hearts, and into our minds that they may bear fruit. We ask this in Jesus’ name, amen. 

I. DESPERATE FOR JESUS (How we come to Him)

So, first we see a desperation for Jesus. That’s our first point. A life of faith looks like being desperate for Jesus. Or, desperate for Jesus, how we come to him. So, what we see in our story is that Jesus is approached by a man named Jairus, who was one of the rulers of the synagogue, it says in verse 22, which means that he would have been responsible for the general oversight of the synagogue. He was a layperson, he wasn’t a full time person that was paid, per se, but he would decide who would do the readings on the Sabbath, what readings there would be, the particulars of the readings, and he would decide who would teach and explain the Torah. So, general oversight. This means, also, because this synagogue was the hub of Jewish culture, this means that he would have been a prominent public figure, highly respected, normally upright, most likely very wealthy. 

But, it’s interesting, here, that culturally, the behavior that we see in the text does not demonstrate his standing. In fact, he does something in this text he probably has never done in his life. In verse 22, he comes to Jesus, and he falls at his feet. This man of wealth, this man of power, this man of prominence and position, in the midst of a crowd of people, he comes and falls at the feed of Jesus. He’s desperate. And, he’s desperate for a good reason. He’s desperate because, unless Jesus heals his daughter, her death is certain. Jesus is the hope for one of the people he loves most in the world. It’s not hard for us to understand where he’s coming from. All of us, to some degree or another, have experienced death. We’ve experienced people that we know, and people that we’ve loved, dying. And so, we get this desperation.

Now, it’s interesting here, as well, that Jesus hasn’t had the best relationships with the synagogues. Jesus tended to get into some trouble at times in the synagogue, because he was a threat to the religious status quo. He came in with these incredible claims of being the fulfillment of scripture, and on a practical level, what this meant for Jairus, is that it would have been best for his position, it would have been wise for him to stay out of entanglements with Jesus, at the very least, to remain neutral. Because, this meant that his position would have been scrutinized. He was coming to Jesus and falling at his feet, this man that caused so much chaos in the synagogues. 

So, he doesn’t stay out of this entanglement, though. His desperation overrides his personal concerns for position, and his personal concerns for safety. And, that’s what desperation does. Let’s look at verses 23 and 24. So, he comes, he sees Jesus, he falls at his feet, and it says … and implored him earnestly, saying, “My little daughter is at the point of death. Come and lay your hands on her so that she may be made well and live,” and he went with him … Jesus, notice, responds to this desperate plea. Jesus responds. See, there’s no questioning, there’s simply … and he goes with him. Jesus responds and the crowd follows at it continues in verse 24 … and a great crowd followed him and thronged about him … They wanted to see this miracle. They knew that he was a miracle worker, so they were following, because they wanted to see another one. 

Now, imagine for a moment the mix of emotions Jairus must have had at this point. Imagine the mix of nervousness and excitement. The mix of anxiety, and hope. This may actually happen, he said yes, he’s coming with me! Maybe there is hope for my daughter. And, you can picture Jairus sort of leading Jesus, or at least I can picture myself leading Jesus with these fast paced steps on the way to get to his daughter, and then occasionally looking back over his shoulder to see if Jesus was still coming, if the hope was still there, and picture that. This mix of anxiety and hope. 

And, in one moment, he looks back over his shoulder, and Jesus isn’t there. Jairus looks over his shoulder, and Jesus has stopped, and he’s scanning the crowd. It seems to be he’s looking for something. He stopped. Look at verses 25-30 … And there was a woman who had had a discharge of blood for twelve years, and who had suffered much under many physicians, and had spent all that she had, and was no better but rather grew worse. She had heard the reports about Jesus and came up behind him in the crowd and touched his garment. For she said, “If I touch even his garments, I will be made well.” And immediately the flow of blood dried up, and she felt in her body that she was healed of her disease. And Jesus, perceiving in himself that power had gone out from him, immediately turned about in the crowd and said, “Who touched my garments?” … This is why he stopped. This is why, in the march to the deathbed, he stops, and he turns, and he scans the crowd. A woman has touched the hem of his garment, and this woman, here, is inserted into this story because she is the antithesis of Jairus. 

She was a complete and total outcast, socially. Leviticus 15 gives us details about what this woman would have been enduring. Because, it tells us that a woman during her menstrual flow is unclean for seven days, but that if it’s an ongoing blood flow, that she was unclean as long as the blood flowed. Do you remember how long the blood flowed for this woman? 12 years. 12 years of being unclean. Now, clean versus unclean is alien to us today. We’ve touched on it, some, in the book of Mark. But, we need to understand that she was untouchable. We need to understand that when she went into public, even though she was not supposed to go in the midst of crowds, if she did meander into the midst of a crowd, there would be cries of “unclean!” that would go before her, so that the sea of people would part and give her a wide space. She was untouchable. Could you imagine going, today, to Citrus Plaza, and as you walk into Citrus Plaza, people begin to cry out, “unclean!”? Could you imagine what that would do to your soul, to your mind, to your sense of worth? Could you imagine how that would shrivel you inwardly?

She was cut off from society, and she was cut off from the temple. She was cut off from worship. She had suffered much, it says, under physicians, and had spent everything she has. And, it says that she was actually worse off for it. Now, physicians during that time were - as you read about their specific practices - they were more like magicians, than anything. The Talmud, which is a Jewish commentary on the law and the prophets, gives us some of the cures for this type of ailment. And, undoubtedly, some of the cures that this woman would have tried. I’ll give you a few of them, here. One of them is to take a kind of resin - which you get from a tree, a kind of gum - and, you mix it with wine, and you drink it. Another, is to boil some onions, and mix it with wine, and as they drink it, say, “Arise from thy flux.” It sounds like Harry Potter stuff, right? Another one is you go to an intersection of roads, where you have to decide to go one way or another, and, again with a cup of wine in your right hand - obviously, wine was the go-to medicine of the day - with a cup of wine in your right hand, have someone come up behind the person and scare them, and again, you say, “Arise from thy flux.” It’s a miracle she wasn’t healed, right? 

This is the kind of stuff that, apparently, she spent all her money on, in a desperate attempt to go from unclean to clean. And, she is left worse off than she was. It says that she suffered. The word, suffered, there, really is most akin to the word torment. This woman has been tormented. She is suffering as much from the cures as she is from the disease. And, so, she is desperate. She is desperate, and she throws herself at his feet, as well. So, we get in this two people, in desperate situations, coming to Jesus. 

What does a life of faith look like? It looks like being desperate for Jesus. Thomas Watson, who was a 17th century pastor, he said … Faith can make use of the waters of affliction, to swim faster to Christ … Do you find yourself in the midst of affliction this morning? In the midst of sin, in the midst of suffering? The imagine of Psalm 130, is of drowning in the depths of suffering and sinfulness, and I want to read that this morning … 

Out of the depths I cry to you, O Lord!

 O Lord, hear my voice!

Let your ears be attentive

    to the voice of my pleas for mercy!

If you, O Lord, should mark iniquities,

    O Lord, who could stand?

But with you there is forgiveness,

    that you may be feared.

I wait for the Lord, my soul waits,

    and in his word I hope;

my soul waits for the Lord

    more than watchmen for the morning,

    more than watchmen for the morning.

O Israel, hope in the Lord!

    For with the Lord there is steadfast love,

    and with him is plentiful redemption.

And he will redeem Israel

    from all his iniquities.

  • Psalm 130, ESV

 

In the midst of drowning in our sin and our suffering, the Psalmist says, we don’t look in, we look up. We look up desperately, cause there’s only one who rescues us in the midst of that. This morning, do we see our need for him? And, it’s not just sin and suffering that drive us to Christ. It is meant that, even in the good times, that we should be driven to Christ. If we’re honest, if the testimony that we see from scripture is true, that it often takes affliction to help us see our desperate need for Christ. It’s in the midst of that, that we recognize that we can’t fix it ourselves, that our hope must be in another. We don’t look in, we look up. But, you may find yourself, not in the midst of this deep kind of affliction. Even in the midst of that, our prayer should be, Lord, make me desperate for you.

It’s one of the great challenges, I think, of the church in the west, is, in the midst of our prosperity, in the midst of how much we have to thank God for it, it can lull us to sleep. It can make us less than desperate for God. So, a life of faith means a life of desperation for God. We don’t look in, we look up. Are you desperate this morning? If not, ask the Lord, Lord, make me desperate for you. Help me to see my need for you, whether I’m in the midst of good times or difficult affliction. Lord, help me to see my need for you. This is how we come to Christ.

 

II. DELAYED BY JESUS (How we grow to trust Him)

See, without desperation, we never come to him. And, we’re called to come to him again, and again, and again. Are we desperate for him? And from there, as we come to him desperately, what can be difficult is in the midst of our desperation, Lord, we come to you, we experience delay. Any of you guys ever experienced that with the Lord? You go to him, you’re praying, you’re wondering, how long is this going to take? What is the deal with this delay, I don’t understand it. We see that, deeply, in our text. Delayed by Jesus. Delay is how we grow to trust him. So, we come to him desperately, and as we come to him, no doubt in the midst of it, his timeline will be different than ours.

So, as we come, what we see is that there is a problem here from the lady that she’s bringing to Jesus, that is chronic. The issue of blood has been going on for 12 years, and then there’s a problem that is acute. There is this young girl, 12 years old, who has a fever and she is on the verge of death. So, we have this chronic problem, and we have this acute problem that could lead to death. And, notice what Jesus does. Jesus chooses to stop and deal with what seems to be the less urgent of the two problems. Think about it in this way. Think about a doctor’s office. If two people show up at the same time, and they go see the doctor, and one has a chronic issue that’s been going on for a number of years, and one has an acute issue that could result in death, there’s no question about which one you go see first, right? I heard one person say that Jesus would have had a malpractice lawsuit, right? You don’t do that. It doesn’t make sense to us. What’s he doing here? What is this delay about?

The great physician, here, chooses to give his attention to the chronic issue, the one that doesn’t seem pressing. Now, again, can you imagine Jairus at this point? Quickly walking, Jesus is following, looking over his shoulder, he’s stopped, and he sees exactly what he’s dealing with, what Jesus has stopped for. Not a woman who seems to be on the verge of death, but a woman who is unclean, a woman who is not welcome in his synagogue, a woman he would never be around. Jesus has stopped for her. Can you imagine the frustration and angst? Doesn't Jesus know that this is urgent? Doesn’t Jesus know that time is of the essence? What is he doing? He’s clearly not thinking well. Does he recognize what’s happening?

And then, it intensifies. Jairus’ worst fear is realized. Look at verse 35 … While he was still speaking, there came from the ruler’s house some who said, “Your daughter is dead. Why trouble the Teacher any further?” … We’ve just gone to a whole other level. Now this delay has resulted in the death of my daughter, the very reason I desperately came to you. It’s easy, very easy to get Jairus’ perspective on this. Because, it’s easy for us to believe we know what the best move is in a given situation, don’t we? We think we know Jesus well enough to be able to discern what his next move is going to be. Certainly, he’s going to do this, because it’s obvious. Obviously, this is the right move, Jesus, just listen to me. I’ll point you in the right direction, Jesus, just listen to me.

And then, in the midst of that, in the midst of our desperation, in the midst of praying, in the midst of going to Christ, he does something that makes no sense at all. He does something that frustrates us, that angers us. Some of us are dealing with that this morning. We’re in the midst of that. We’ve prayed, we’ve asked, we’ve gone to Christ desperately, yet it doesn’t seem to be going the way we think it should. Some of us are struggling with the synecism in the face of that reality.

I think one thing that’s important for us to grasp as we, in the midst of our desperation, seek to live a life of faith, and for our faith to grow, our trust to grow in Christ, is that the opposite of faith isn’t doubt, the opposite of faith is control. The opposite of faith is, “I know what needs to be done,” and that whether we give voice to it or not, whether we articulate it or not, we expect God to somehow be subservient to that. The opposite of faith isn’t doubt, it’s control. And, precisely because in the delay Jesus is bringing about our good, precisely for that reason, he will not be controlled by what we think he should do. He loves us too much. He cares for us too much.

And so, what we see in this, is that with Jesus, delayed does not mean denied. Delayed, for your situation, does not mean denied. It may not becoming like you expect or as quickly as you expect, but because of who Jesus is, remember last week we looked at Jesus was both good and powerful, and we have to believe both of those. If we don’t, we will live a very angsty Christian life. He is good and powerful, he is both of those things. And, if we believe that, we have to trust that if we are experiencing a delay, it’s because there’s something at play in the situation that God knows, and we don’t. And, man, that’s hard for us. Isn’t it? It’s hard for us. It’s hard for us, people who love calendars and scheduling and planning, and we love to be able to look at everything and go, that fits there, and that fits there, and then we look at our week, and we go, oh, yes. I’m in control. And then, we go to God and he blows it all up. Yes. it’s because, if he is good and powerful, there’s something at play in the delay that God knows, and we don’t. 

I know when I look back at the frustrating delays of my life, and I’m just speaking of me, I’m sure this isn’t you, I see a level of arrogance and control, that I know better than God knows. Listen, if God would have let me and my wife leave the church we were at, plant Emmaus Church, all this awesome stuff that’s happening now wouldn’t have happened in 11 years, it would have happened the first year. Right? If it was up to me, it all would have been happening like this, but that’s not the way God works, and in the midst of Emmaus Church being planted, the gospel was being planted in me, and it was being planted in you, and it was not my timeline. I mean, if I could go back and show you the initial timeline of, this is what Emmaus Church was going to be in three years, it would be hilarious. You’d go, wow, I don’t know if it was faith or if you were just a naive knucklehead.

And, it’s true. I was. One of the things, the older I get, as I look back on my life, it becomes more and more clear that there is one God, and I am not him. He knows better than me. The stuff he worked in me over this long period, and my wife, and my family, I’m so grateful for it, which brings us to the good news about delays. We saw last week that his grace, and his love are compatible with storms, with the anti-kingdom that comes against us, and in this week’s text we see that his grace and his love are compatible with delays.

See, the delays of God are bringing about our good. I don’t tell you that based upon my own experience, I tell you that based upon the powerful and good God that is revealed in scripture, and the purposes that he has for his people. The delays of God are bringing about our good. In fact, listen to this, the delays of God mean that we will sacrifice more than we thought, and we will gain more than we hoped. This is clear in the next. The woman with the issue of blood comes to Jesus in faith, at great risk to herself, she’s not supposed to be in the midst of this crowd of people, she pushes through the crowd, touches the hem of Jesus’ garment, a woman who is unclean touching a rabbi, major no-no. And, immediately receives the healing. And, when she receives it, she goes right back into the crowd. She wants this healing, she is desperate for Jesus, but she wants it incognito. She wants it without anyone knowing. 

But, notice what Jesus does. He calls her out in front of the crowd. Again, you might question his wisdom, hey, who knows, they could stone this lady, they could beat her, no telling what they could do. It doesn’t seem wise to us, but Jesus has her good in mind. He calls her out in front of the crowd, he forces her to go public. See, the desperate faith that brought her to Jesus is now requiring more of her than she thought. But, look at what happens in verse 33 … But the woman, knowing what had happened to her, came in fear and trembling and fell down before him and told him the whole truth … Jesus, it was me that touched you, she’s saying. I know I shouldn’t have, it was me, she’s fearful. And, he said to her … “Daughter, … this term of endearment … your faith has made you well; go in peace, and be healed of your disease.” …

Go in peace. We’ve talked about that word before, that word shalom, it’s this idea of perfect harmony with God. It’s not just physical healing, this is a deep restoration of harmony with God, which results in restoration of relationship with self, and with creation, and with others. This is this holistic, beautiful healing. She comes to Jesus to do a touch and run, and Jesus doesn’t let her. He says, not so fast. We’re going to make this thing public, and you’re going to get a far greater healing than you came for. That’s the redemption of Christ. She comes to Jesus to touch and run, and Jesus asks more of her than she thought, and he gives her more than she came for. That is at work in the delays. That is at work, but we have to trust that that is at work, and we have to have faith, believe, because he is powerful and good, that that is at work.

See, what Jairus can’t see in the delay, what he cannot see, is that Jesus takes a woman with an almost superstitious faith, it seems, who came for a bodily healing, and makes her a transformed disciple for all eternity, and he says, Jesus is saying, that has to be acted upon now. I have to do that now. The opportunity is now. So, your delay is this woman’s eternal security, this woman’s holistic healing. It’s the same for Jairus, though. He comes to Jesus, and Jesus asks more of him. He comes to Jesus to cure a fever, and when it’s over with, he gets a resurrection. Jesus asks him to believe. Look at what Jairus upon the news that his daughter has died, in verse 36 … While he was still speaking, there came from the ruler’s house some who said, “Your daughter is dead. Why trouble the Teacher any further?” But overhearing what they said, Jesus said to the ruler of the synagogue, “Do not fear, only believe.” … 

Now, Jairus comes to Jesus trusting only that Jesus would come with him so that his daughter might be healed. And now, he’s being asked to trust Jesus in the midst of his daughter’s death. It’s more than he asked for. But, what we see is that he also gets more than he hoped. He comes to Jesus to cure a fever, and he gets a resurrection. See, Jesus tells him in the midst of that news, he says, believe in me, trust me. And, when Jesus asks Jairus to trust him, I sort of get this picture of him looking around Jairus, straight at me, and telling me the same thing. Believe me. Trust me. In the midst of affliction, in the midst of your desperation, in the midst of the delay, trust me. 

See, the delays force us with our weak faith, to trust in a great Christ. We’re asked to believe based upon the character of Christ, and that’s what it means to be dependent. A life of faith means that we come to him desperately, that in the midst of the delay, our faith grows, we continue to believe in him, even though his timeline is not the same as ours, even though he’s working in a way that we don’t believe is perhaps the best, we believe, we trust, our faith grows in the midst of that, so that we become people we are dependent upon him, in every season of life.

III. DEPENDENT UPON JESUS (How we remain in Him)

The final point, how we remain in him. So, a life of faith means we see our need for Jesus, we come to him desperately, but we also must see something of his character, right? We only depend upon that which we find dependable. And so, if we are not consistently depending upon Christ, then it means there’s something we’re not seeing about the character and nature of Christ, who he truly is. And so, there are three things, real quick, I want to hit that we see. 

One, what we need to see to live dependent upon him is that his grace is for you. His grace is for you, unqualified you … whoever would come to me … his grace is for you. We see this in the juxtaposition, which we mention, of Jairus and the woman with the issue of blood. Jairus is a male. In that culture, with all the power. She’s a female with no power. He’s a synagogue ruler, she’s ceremonially unclean, can’t enter the synagogue. He’s wealthy, she spent all of her money to try to get well. He’s at the top of the social hierarchy, she’s at the bottom. Yet, in the midst of that, Jesus turns to the woman and gives her his full attention, treating her as if there is nothing else in the world happening here, but you. In the midst of this crowd of people, when he asks, who touched me? Remember the disciples? What did they say? What do you mean who touched you? Everybody’s touching you! This is a crazy scene, but in the midst of that, he looks at her as if she is the only person in the world, his grace is for you. He turns to a woman with zero status and power, and makes a religious leader wait in the moment of his greatest need. His grace is for you.

This isn’t unusual for Jesus to do. We see it over and over in the gospels. You have an insider and an outsider, and Jesus turns quickly to the outsider. Right? You have someone who’s really messed up, you have someone who is an outcast, and they’re drawn in by Jesus again and again. See, the kingdom of God reverses the values of the world. Jesus doesn’t come to people on the basis of pedigree, on the basis of status, on the basis of anything else. He comes to them because of his grace. And, he comes to us because of his grace.

Listen, this morning it doesn’t matter who you are, it doesn’t matter what you’ve done. Jesus’ grace is for you. Paul tells us he’s chosen the foolish things of the world to shame the wise, so that no one could boast in his presence. We have nothing to bring before him to boast of, and that’s how we can know his grace is for us. So, we have this juxtaposition, this interweaving of these two stories from two radically different places. It’s meant to tell us the greatest to the least and everything in between, his grace is for you. 

Secondly, his power is for you. Again, we saw that last week. But, at this point, the plot has thickened. The report is that the girl is dead, but Jesus says he’s going anyway. And, Jesus shows up, and everybody’s wailing, and actually during that time, at funerals they would hire professional mourners, and they would come, and there would be loud weeping, and there would be dirt on head, and there would be torn clothes, and it would have been a very chaotic scene that Jesus would have walked into. And so, what we’ve seen leading up to this, last week, we’ve seen Jesus’ power over creation, in the storm. We’ve seen Jesus’ power over the anti-kingdom, and the daemoniac. Now, we see his kingdom over our greatest enemy, death. 

When we talk about sin, sin and death are bed fellows, right? And, they have a lot of friends, and we experience all of those. We all experience some aspect of the fallenness of this world, the sin and death of this world. And so, what we’re seeing is that Jesus, in his power that is for us, that it conquers our greatest enemy, death. It’s confusing, though, that Jesus says, she’s just sleeping. Did you catch that? What does he mean there? Many people have questioned, so is this a resuscitation or a resurrection? Was she just sleeping? But, when we look at the other accounts, Luke 8:22, which treats this narrative, he says her spirit returned to her. She was dead. That’s biblical language for she had died. Everyone knew she was dead. So why does he say this? I think, in one sense, in light of Christ’s power, it’s because death, for the believer, is like waking up after a good sleep. And, you might go, what? What are you talking about? But, look at the language. I think it unpacks it a little more.

He goes in to see this little girl, 12 years old, and it says he takes her by the hand, and he says … talitha … meaning, little girl, or perhaps, a deeper meaning might be little lady, or one translator said it could mean, today, it would have been an expression like honey. This is a deep term of endearment for this little girl, and it’s a name a parent would use for their little girl. And he says, talitha koum, koum means wake up, honey, daughter, wake up. See, Jesus, here, is facing a greater foe than a hurricane or demons that we’ve looked at in previous weeks. He’s facing death, a most feared enemy of the human race. And, Jesus, the creator, the same hands that scattered the stars and formed the mountains, grabs this little girl by the hand, and he raises her up through death as if it’s nothing to him. That’s the power of Christ, and that power is for you. 

Jesus says, essentially, if i have you by the hand, death is nothing more than a good night’s sleep. It’s like a good night’s sleep when you’re a kid, and you wake up and you realize you’re going to Disneyland. That’s what death is. Do you remember feelings like that? Maybe it was something else, maybe Disneyland wasn’t your thing. But, when your mom or your dad would wake you up, and you’d realize, oh, today’s the day. That’s death for the believer. Wake up, today’s the day. I get to be with him. He gently lifts her through it. That is his power. And, how does that power come to bear in our life? 

Finally, he became weak for you. It’s interesting that he notices power goes out from him when the woman with the issue of blood touches the hem of his garment. Because, that doesn’t happen, you notice, when he speaks to the hurricane on the sea. He speaks as if it’s a little child. There’s no sense of power going out from him, that’s not mentioned. But, here, it’s almost in his humanity, we see a weakness. We see this power goes out from him, so she might receive shalom true peace. And, I think it’s foreshadowing the cross of Christ. 

How can he hold us by hand, despite our weakness, despite our evil? The answer is, because he became weak for us. 2 Corinthians 13:4 speaks about this … For he was crucified in weakness, but lives by the power of God. For, we also are weak in him, but in dealing with you, we will live with him by the power of God … Crucified in weakness, that we could live in God’s power. Crucified in weakness, that we could live a life of faith. 

See, Jesus, in a sense, lost his Father’s hand on the cross, so that we could take hold of his hand, and went into the tomb so that we could be raised out of it, and he went and was crucified, cast out, outside the camp he became unclean so that we could be brought in and made clean. This is the Christ that we desperately long for. This is the Christ, because of his power and goodness, because his grace is for you and his power is for you, and he became weak for you, no matter your station in life, you can live a life of faith knowing that though it will cost you more than you imagine, you will receive more than you hoped. Let’s pray. 

Jesus, 

We are grateful this morning for this truth, for this beautiful reality that because of the work of Jesus Christ, because of the incarnation of Christ, because of the gift of Christ becoming weak for us, we can live lives of faith. People that are desperate for Christ, that recognize we have no hope apart from him, and yet at the same time, Lord, we are people who in the midst of delay, recognize that God’s good is at work in our lives, even if we can’t understand it. And, Lord, that leads us to being a dependent people, because God, you are dependable. Lord, as we come to the table this morning, may we come as people who are transferring trust from ourselves, to you. Lord, I know there are people here in the midst of serious sin and suffering and difficulty and the fallenness of this world. God, I pray that in the midst of the delay they may be experiencing, that you would bring to their heart and mind in this meal your goodness, that your grace is for them, your power is for them, that you became weak for them, that they might live in the resurrection power. God, may we live into that reality this morning. We ask in Jesus’ name, amen.