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The Importance of Confession-Full Sermon Transcript

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PASTOR: MATT DENNINGS

SCRIPTURE READING

Philippians 3:12-16

12 Not that I have already obtained this or am already perfect, but I press on to make it my own, because Christ Jesus has made me his own. 13 Brothers, I do not consider that I have made it my own. But one thing I do: forgetting what lies behind and straining forward to what lies ahead, 14 I press on toward the goal for the prize of the upward call of God in Christ Jesus. 15 Let those of us who are mature think this way, and if in anything you think otherwise, God will reveal that also to you. 16 Only let us hold true to what we have attained.

INTRO

Well, good morning. My name is Matt, I’m the Pastor for Equipping here at Emmaus, and this morning we are continuing our series in Philippians. And, last week, if you didn’t catch it, we turned a corner, kind of heading into the final part of Philippians. And, we saw that in this final part of Philippians, Paul is turning his attention to how we experience and know life in Jesus Christ.

And, so, last week in verses 1-11 of chapter 3, we saw Paul’s desire to what he says, he describes as gaining Christ, to be found in Christ, to know Christ. It’s Paul’s way of saying, I want to tangibly experience life in Christ. And, of course, as good church people, last week, we should say amen when we hear that, right? Yet, today, in verses 12-16, Paul says, before I go any further, let me clarify something. He says in verse 12, and I’m paraphrasing here, he says, listen, I haven’t obtained this life fully. The it, in verse 12, is pointing back to verses 8-11, when Paul describes as being found in Christ, in knowing Christ, in living in Christ, and Paul is saying, before I go any further, listen, I haven’t obtained this life fully. I’m not a finished product, I am not perfect.

In other words, Paul says, left to myself, even though I desire to live in Christ, I find over and over again, I fall short of that. And yet, Paul says, the reason why he keeps fighting, pressing, training, is because Jesus Christ has made him his own. And so, therefore, he has this hope that as he presses forward, he will find this life.

Now, as I’ve meditated on this text, I’ve thought, often, why does Paul say this? Why does he go here? Because, this is a bit of an aside from his main argument here. And, part of why I wonder this, is because it’s somewhat repetitive in the language of what he’s just said, one, and two, as I think of that, I think, why do I need to hear this? Why do I need to hear these words from Paul? And, I realize, because even though Paul says that he lives and fights past this reality that day to day, he falls short of the glory of God, that day to day he sins, day to day he fails, the hope that he has in the midst of that is the fact that he belongs to Jesus Christ.

And, I realize when thinking through that phrase, that practically I often live, not as if I belong to Christ, but as if I belong to my failure, as if I belong to my sin, as if I belong to my shortcoming. Like Paul, I desire to live out verses 1-11, to be found in Christ, to have this life in Christ, to know Christ. Yet, like Paul, I also know what it’s like to fall short of that desire. And so, instead of living with this sense that I belong to Christ, I feel more and more like I belong to my sin. Anyone else know what that’s like?  I’m not sure if I’m just alone here, doing a monologue.

Today, we’ll call this tension, the human tension, the human tension that we live with. The universally experienced tension between who we long to be, and we really are, if we’re honest. Like Paul, if we are to know Christ, we have to deal with this tension that we all have deep down. Because, often, it seems like, as Christians, the only way that we can grow, the only way that we can progress, the only way that we can kind of ascend, however you want to describe it, that we can go on deeper into our faith when we live with this nagging reality that, do I really belong to Christ, or do I really belong to my sin?

It seems that the only options on the table, are to either live hypocritically and to pretend that I have it all together, or on the other hand to live hopelessly, and to just give up altogether. But, what Paul says in these five verses unlocks a third way, a better way, a gospel way, a way of hope found in Jesus Christ, that we can live with confidence that we belong not to our sin, but belong to Jesus Christ, wholly.

So, what we’ll look at first is the human tension, we’ll unpack it a little bit further, then the mistaken ways of resolving that tension that we often turn to, and then, lastly, the gospel key to resolving that tension, between who we desire to be, and who we find ourselves to be. But first, let’s pray.

Heavenly Father, we thank you for the truths found in this text. We thank you that here, we see Paul saying things like us, when we’re honest with ourselves, that we have not obtained, fully, this life that we desire. That, we cannot, in and of ourselves, perfect ourselves, but underneath all of this, we belong to Jesus. Lord, we thank you for this truth. Help us to grasp this and the importance of it, and to bring it home to our hearts, so this isn’t just a mere intellectual exercise, but that we would walk away from here knowing that we are your beloved children, if we are in Christ Jesus. And, it is in his name that we pray, amen.

THE HUMAN TENSION

Well, the human tension. Paul puts his finger, again on a tension that is at the center of the Christian life, and human experience. But, there is a gap between who we long to be, and who we are. And, I think in some ways, we know this already. If I just bring up, hey, January 1st until now, how are you doing on that new diet, right? How are you doing on that new exercise routine, how are you doing on your finances? Right? We could go on and on, we know that this is a human reality. That, there are all these areas that, who we long to be, we desire to be, and honestly, we know we should be. But, then, we keep falling short of it. It could be ways that we parent, it could be ways that we interact with others. But, how often do we slow down to think about that dynamic in relation to our spiritual life and our growth?

We sense we should want to know God and live accordingly, and yet, while I feel I want it, I fail to obtain it, Paul says. I’m not already perfect, Paul says. It probably sounds like your journal entry, doesn’t it? God, I want to be patient with others, but they keep … being people. Right? God, I want to stop giving into temptation, but I give in. Here I go again. I’ve given in again. God, I want to start investing my time and energy into blank, whatever initiative, whatever good thing. But, but, but … And, there it is.

While we have these desires, then there is this, I desire this, but … And, if you go long enough in trying to live out this tension, what seems more true of us, is what comes after the but. But, I failed again, I’m a failure. But, I’ve fallen short again, I fall short. But, I blow up again. Yet, Paul says, the way we address the tension, is not by looking to something within ourselves. Rather, to the work of Jesus Christ. He says, Jesus has made me his own. Right after saying, I’ve not lived up to this, I have not perfected myself. And, remember, this is after verses 1-11, where he says, isn’t this great? We have this salvation in Jesus, and we can grab onto this, and we can live this way. And then, he comes to verse 12, and says, let’s just be honest for a moment. And, I want to clarify, this is not something that you are going to, in this life, 100% perfectly attain.

It reminds me of an old story of, there’s a Victorian age preacher in London named Charles Spurgeon, many of you may have heard of him, he’s called the Prince of Preachers. Isn’t that an amazing title? What, me? But, Charles Spurgeon, the Prince of Preachers, and he was at this conference, and this man came up to him, and he said, Charles Spurgeon was preaching on this fact that, of what it means to grow in holiness. And, this man said, no, no, no, we should reach perfection. And, it was this thing called the perfectionist movement. And, Spurgeon kind of debated with him for a minute, and he saw it wasn’t going anywhere.

And so, it was at this conference, and so, the next day, all the individuals are in this conference center, and they’re eating their breakfast. And, Spurgeon sneaks up behind the man, and he takes a cup of milk and just pours it over his head. And, the man jumps out of his seat, and all these expletives come out, and he starts yelling at Spurgeon. And, Spurgeon goes, there’s the old man! Right? And, what he’s drawing out there, is he’s saying, we have this reality that Christ has made us his own. And, we are not going to reach perfection this side of being fully perfected in Christ, and the new kingdom.

It’s God’s grace, given to us by Jesus Christ, that we receive by faith, and trust in that grace, that allows us to grow in holiness, that allows us to grow in Christ’s likeness. We relate to God as sinners who have been made holy, not by our work, but by his.

You know, it looks something like this. I like visuals, and so this is a chart we’ve used before in sermons, but it looks something like this, that the gospel tells us that no matter the depth of our sin, and the gap it creates between us and God, Jesus has bridged the gap in his life, death, and resurrection. And so, after we come to Christ at this time of conversion, what begins to happen, is God’s spirit works within us, he’s made us a new man, he’s made us a new creation. And so, now he’s doing this work. And, as we grow in our awareness of God’s holiness, and we grow in our awareness of our flesh and our sinfulness, our dependency on the cross enlarges, and Jesus gets bigger, Jesus gets better, Jesus gets more and more beautiful. We depend on the grace of God more and more, and we breathe it in, and we breathe it out like oxygen.

So, yes, we sin, we fail, we fall short of the glory of God. But, the gospel says something else about me comes after the but now. What is most true of us in Jesus Christ. Yes, I have done shameful things, yes, I have sinned. But, because of Jesus Christ, I am now a beloved child of God. What comes after the but now? I am a beloved child of God. The gospel gives us hope to press on, because there’s no sin we might commit, or become aware of, that God’s grace cannot cover. Neither height nor depth, Paul says. No matter how far down that arrow goes, the cross goes, and bridges us right back up to God’s holiness. By God’s grace, Christ makes us his own. We belong to him.

Now, this all sounds good, right? The question is, how do we live this? Okay, this sounds great theoretically. Pastor, how do I begin to enter into this, take hold of it, to live it? We’re going to go there. What I want to do first is – cause I think we know this better – which is, the mistaken ways that we attempt to resolve this very tension, this very gap between us and God. This very tension between who we desire to be, and who we find ourselves to be. So, the second point is looking at the mistaken ways of resolving the tension.

THE MISTAKEN WAYS OF RESOLVING THE TENSION

Paul ends this section, verses 12-16, with a very revealing statement. He says this, after saying all these things, he says …

Only let us hold true to what we have attained ...

So, he says all these things, that we are going to grow into Christ’s likeness, and after, he says, but only let us hold onto what we have attained. Hold those things true. Now, why does he have to say this? Well, I think if we’ve lived a little, we know exactly why he has to say this. He has to say it because we’re constantly trying to claim that we are where we are not yet. We’re constantly trying to claim that something is true of us, that frankly is not true of us yet. Rather than resolving the tension of our sin, that process of seeing the cross get bigger day by day in our life, we try to microwave it. Instead of God’s transformative grace, we try to do it quickly, and we resolve the tension of our sin by what comes naturally to us.

Let me illustrate this, because I think this will be helpful, before unpacking this further. In college, I made the regrettable decision of living in one house with 10 guys. And, one night … I’m a little bit of a neat freak, and 10 guys in a house is not a healthy place for a neat freak to live. And so, one night, though, I come down in the middle of the night, and I turn on the lights to the kitchen as I go in to get something, and there are cockroaches everywhere, everywhere. They’re having a little fiesta, right on my kitchen floors. The counter, everything, they’re everywhere.

So, I turn on the light, and what do they do? They … you know, they go and hide. So, I did what any sensible person does when they see that kind of infestation. I turned off the lights, and I tried to forget I ever saw it, right? And, I tried to go back to bed and had nightmares. In fact, even though I knew there was a hidden infestation, when people came over, I would actually … Because, I was actually insecure about it, when I cleaned the house, I would actually be standing in the kitchen talking, and I would actually bring up, like, isn’t it crazy how clean this house is with 10 guys? And they’d be like, yeah, this is amazing. Look at these countertops, right? And, this went on for about a year, until one morning somebody poured out a bowl of cereal and they got, you know, like, a special little prize in their cereal. And, I said, yeah, that’s been going on for a while.

Now, this illustrates more than probably why the CDC should not allow 10 20-year-old men to live together in one place, without supervision. But, it illustrates what we tend to do with our sin. At some point, you see, the light’s going to be turned on. And, I don’t know if you know that moment, but you see the infestation for what it is. And, of course, as soon as the light goes on, everything in you just kind of recoils and hides, right?

The light could come through a relationship. This is why it’s so tough that first year of marriage, right? Cause, you’ve been able to just kind of avoid it, and all of a sudden, now someone’s right there with you, and they’re like … did you know you have a massive infestation? Right? The light could come on through a circumstance that stirs up ungodly attitudes, just kind of, like, speak that comes out of you, that you’re like, where did that come from?

An illustration that we’ve use before, is that it’s like you have water that’s kind of all dirty. Like you have all this stuff polluting you, clouding you, this sin that’s in you. And, when life is kind of nice and stable, the water, if it sits there long enough, and it’s not disruptive, just kind of settles to the bottom. And, if you look at that water from the side, you go, wow … look how pure that person is, right? But, what happen when something comes along and bumps that table? All of a sudden, it stirs it all up. Something stirs your life, and it just makes a mess, and you go, where did this all come from?

Relationships, situations, or it could just be, simply, that God’s spirit turns the lights on in your heart, and you see for the first time. And, when that happens, we feel the tension of our sin. We feel this human tension. We feel this tension between, this is not who I want to be, but yet, this is coming out of me, this is who I am. And, it’s a tension we want to escape, it’s a tension we want to avoid, it’s a tension that we desperately want to silence. Because, we are seeing what we are really like. And, frankly, we’re seeing what the Bible has already told us we are, that we’re sinners in need of grace.

But, seeing our sin, we tend to resolve the tension the way I solved my infestation problem. And, these are the two mistaken ways we tend to resolve sin. The first is pretending, and the other is by performing. And, they both cut us off from experiencing the power of God’s grace. And these, by the way, this is another chart – like the last one. These charts, by the way, come from a book called The Gospel Centered Life, it’s linked in the sermon notes. I’d highly recommend it, if you’d like, about an 8-week study, kind of going deeper into the gospel, again, the gospel centered life.

But, by pretending, here’s what I mean. When I turned off the lights and pretended my sin wasn’t there, and I pretended like it would go away, we also tend to hide our sin from God and others, by pretending everything is okay, by just pretending it’s all okay. It may look like lying, it probably means that there are habits of, kind of, avoiding and withdrawing, especially from other people who might hold you accountable, or who know you best … isolating yourself. Honestly, a sign, often, of pretending, is actually exhaustion. And, the reason for that is because, if you’re pretending, what we tend to have, is we tend to start living, almost, two lives.

There’s kind of, like, your good church life, I’m around Christian life. And then, there’s this other life, which you may actually, in your heart of hearts, feel like, here’s my real life. Here’s when I really am who I am. And, we tend to split those, because we’re pretending, and we’re dealing with that tension by separating them, and it’s exhausting. Because, what happens, is after a while, you’re constantly trying to remember, was I there, or was there … I’m trying to tell this story, where was I, what was I doing? And, it’s exhausting because you can never really remember, how was I acting, how should I act now, where was I, what was I doing? What was the story? Do I have it straight?

There’s a line that captures this by Mark Twain, that’s really well said. He says, “If you tell the truth, you don’t have to remember anything.” Man, there’s no exhaustion in that. It just comes out. If you tell the truth, you don’t have to remember anything. But, when we pretend, the result is that we think by pressing on, and catch this, we often think that by pressing on, what Paul actually means here, is to pretend. Functionally, what we think, is Paul means to pretend. We could call this fake it until you make it spirituality. And, it leads to burnout. It leads to hopelessness, as if life in Christ is only available to the spiritual elite.

But, pretending we do not have sin will not solve our tension. It will not clear out the infestation, but rather it makes us feel more hopelessly like we belong to our sin. Now, the second way, we have pretending, and we also have performing.

And, by performing, I mean, like when I cleaned the counters, without cleaning the infestation. It’s performing for everyone. Everyone expects a clean house, and no bugs, and no filth, and so I’m trying to perform to live up to that expectation. And so, I constantly scrub the house, and do everything but deal with the actual cockroaches, because that was just nasty.

But, we tend to bury our sin in busyness, to impress God and others, as if by pressing on, again, Paul means to perform, to put on our best moral performance. If perform well enough, and busy enough, and if we meet everyone’s expectations, then we expect that that tension that we feel deep down, will go away. But, it doesn’t. And, often, we end up living as hypocrites and perpetuating a culture of hypocrisy. It starts a cycle. What happens, is, we feel like a hypocrite because we’re living one way, when we, in fact, know that we don’t actually measure up to this.

And, as we feel like a hypocrite, then we feel like we belong to our sin. And, because we feel like we belong to our sin, and we don’t belong to Christ, then that just furthers us into this constant habit of performing, because that’s all we know. And then, as we perform, we feel further like a hypocrite. And, on and on, the cycle goes. Dietrich Bonhoeffer captured this dynamic well, when happens in a community. He says, “Many Christians are unthinkably horrified when a real sinner is suddenly discovered among the righteous. So, we remain alone in our sin, living in lies and hypocrisy. He who is alone with his sins is utterly alone.”

Some of you this morning are in this place of just performing. Some of you, also, may be in the place of pretending. And, either way, what you sense right now is that there’s a me that feels like it needs to be acting in some certain way. And then, there’s the real me. And, you’re on the cusp of burn out, you’re on the cusp of hopelessness. If you’re performing as if everything’s okay, it will not solve the tension. It will not make the infestation go away. Rather, it will lead you deeper into hypocrisy, and deepen that sense that you belong to your sin.

Both pretending and performing fail to deal with the tension of our sin, and both, in the end, only make us feel like we belong to our sin. Because, both cut us off from the work of the cross. So, how do we resolve this tension? We’ve seen what it is, we’ve looked at the mistaken ways that we deal with it. So, what is the way that we deal with this tension? So, the third point, the gospel key to resolving the tension.

THE GOSPEL KEY TO RESOLVING THE TENSION

How do we resolve it? Honestly, sincerely. We see right under our noses, in verses 13-14, Paul says, brothers, I do not consider that I have made it my own. But, one thing I do, forgetting what lies behind, and straining forward to what lies ahead, I press on toward the goal for the prize of the upward call of God in Jesus Christ. Paul says, I’m not going to pretend, I’m not going to perform, and act like I’ve perfected myself in some way.

And, think about that. This is a guy who’s an apostle. If anyone had the weight on his shoulders to try to live up to expectations, and to try to perform for other people, or try to just go through the motions and pretend, it would be Paul. People were constantly slandering him, saying, look, he’s not really an apostle, he’s just an imposter. Can you imagine if Paul had any little bit of a sense in himself that he was leaning into being an imposter, and not really living out the things that he was proclaiming?

Paul says, I’m not going there, and I’m not going back to the old ways of relating to God. For Paul, that was actually going back to the old system, the old covenant, the old way of relating to God. For us, that may be saying, I’m not going back to the old way of pretending and performing anymore. Instead, in verse 14, I’m going to press on toward the goal. What does that look like? Well, that first chart again. Pressing on, Paul is saying, saying, I’m going to do whatever it takes, in Jesus Christ, to know Christ.

Back in verse 11, he actually says, by any means, I will use anything that will help me, any means in any way, so that I may know Christ, and I may grow in this reality. And, that happens by doing whatever it takes to see the cross get bigger. Now, that, for Paul – and here’s the thing, don’t miss this – when he says, in verse 14, I press on toward the goal for the prize of the upward call of God in Jesus Christ, doesn’t that almost, at first, seem a little vague? That’s kind of a weird English sentence, first, and second, what does this goal mean?

And, what he’s talking about, is like that first chart, that as he progresses in the Christian faith, if you mature, you are going to realize more and more and more the depth of your sin. You’re going to, then, as you realize the depth of your sin, realize how much holier than you ever knew before, God is. And so, what Paul is saying, when I’m pressing on, is I’m going to truly mature, which is, I’m going to see more and more and more how big and wide and deep is the cross, and how good God’s grace is. This is God’s will for you. This is the goal of Paul, that he would more and more and more see the beauty of what Christ as accomplished on his behalf, and live into that.

See, the ironic thing about being a mature Christian, is that it’s not about perfection. The ironic thing about becoming a mature Christian, that is coupled with an increased awareness that you are not fully mature, that there’s always more growth. For Paul, that straining forward to what lies ahead, is more and more of a sense that he belongs to Christ by grace. That, as he becomes more and more aware of how sinful he is, he simultaneously becomes more and more aware of how much love and grace he’s been given in the cross.

This is summed up well by a pastor in New York City named Tim Keller. He says, “The gospel is this, we are more sinful and flawed in ourselves than we ever dare believe. Yet, at the very same time, we are more loved and accepted in Jesus Christ than we ever dared hope.” Do you believe that? That’s what pressing on looks like. Putting aside pretending and performing, and looking straight at our sin, and then straight to Christ. So, how do we do that? We talked about what it is, how do we do that?

Well, the key that gospel provides for doing this, for pressing forward, is the discipline of confession, or the habit of confession. It’s something that we went over this morning in our liturgy. And, when we got the point of confession. If some of this is sounding familiar, it’s because it was right there in a nugget form during confession. Notice Paul confesses two things in this passage. First, Paul confesses that he is unable to save himself, or perfect himself. The gospel frees him to be honest. The second thing that he confesses, though, is Christ has made me his own. The gospel provides a way forward, a hope.

See, the discipline, the habit of confession, is simply going before God and confessing both of these truths. And, when I say a discipline or a habit, I mean, for me, this looks like early in the morning, I’m an early riser. For you, it might not be beginning of the day. Although, I think there is something about the beginning of the day that’s helpful. But, rising early and opening up God’s word, but taking out a piece of paper and writing down, and thinking before God, of what are … literally, I get specific … and, write down the specific things, the sins that, over the last day, have come out of me. And, I go before God and bring these before him, and I ask for his forgiveness. And, as I do so, I confess two things. I confess that I have sinned, and I also confess that I belong to Jesus Christ, that God has closed that gap.

Now, I should say this. You may think that such a habit, one, is maybe unhelpful or weird, I’ll just say it. Or, that it’s legalistic. And, one thing that I want to say in response to that, is I would like us to consider for a moment how often, throughout our day, we tell ourselves, or we confess to ourselves, things about ourselves, and things about God, without training ourselves to do that in a healthy way.

And so, when we sin, what do we do? Man, I remember, so often I would be like like, oh, stupid, stupid, when I did something. And, this comes out. And, the thing is, when I go [to confess], it’s like, yes, I can look at this. This is what I’ve done. But then, simultaneously, this is not who I’m called to be in Jesus Christ. And, there’s grace here, and I can begin to grow out of this sin, versus just beating ourselves up. And so, what I would ask you, is if you don’t have any kind of a habit of training your heart, and training your mind to point yourself to Jesus Christ in the midst of your sin, then plan some kind of a habit, plan some kind of a habit.

Let me ask you, though, do you slow down regularly, to specifically confess both your sin, and who you are in Christ, before God? Do you have a habit of simply doing those two things together? I guarantee it will transform your life. It will transform your walk with Christ. It’s an important question, because I think we live our lives so on the go, go, go, go, to the next thing, constantly downloading information in a digital world, that we forget what is actually true of us. That, we are more sinful and flawed in ourselves than we ever dared hope, Keller says. Yet, at the very same time, we are more loved and accepted in Jesus Christ than we ever dared hope.

I encourage you, this week, to pick up the Lent devotional or download it, if you have not already. In it, you will find, for this week, instructions for how to begin a habit of confession. There are scriptural passages you can go to there, Psalm 51, Psalm 139, that will help guide you in forming a habit of confession. And, I guarantee, knowing Christ has made you his own, despite knowing – and think of this, Christ made you his own full well knowing, Christ knows from age 34 right now, on March 17th, 2019, until whenever my life ends – Jesus is well aware of the sin that I will accrue to my account, put it that way. And yet, even in the midst of knowing those thing, he makes me his own. Knowing that truth will lead to a life that increasingly looks like Christ, because you will grow in your appreciation, your love, your longing, your dependence upon Jesus.

CONCLUSION

Let me recap. Every human being first lives with a tension, that because of sin, there’s a gap between who we long to be, and who we really are. Second, don’t fall into the trap of trying to resolve that tension by pretending and performing. It will only lead to hopelessness or hypocrisy. And then, finally, instead, forgetting what lies behind and straining forward to what lies ahead, press on by developing a discipline of confession, confessing your needs before God for his grace in Jesus Christ.

Emmaus, bring your sin into the light, and don’t pretend like it isn’t there, or try, by performance, to fix it. But, let the cross do its work. Let the cross, and the resurrection, and the indwelling power of God’s spirit, do its work. Something I haven’t unpacked, and I probably should have, is the power that God’s Spirit works in when we go before God’s Word. We acknowledge our sin and humility before the very presence of a holy God, especially when we’re going through scriptures, seeing these descriptions of a holy God. And, we’re just realizing, this is not me when I’m honest with myself, God’s spirit uses that to radically change us, to break free from living as if we belong to sin. We can begin living with confidence that mind, body, and soul, we belong wholly to Jesus Christ. Let’s pray.

Heavenly Father, we thank you for the life that we have in Christ. Father, reveal to us where we are missing out on all we have in Jesus. Show us what we have gained in him, that we might belong to him as your beloved. Spirit of Christ, help us, help us, Spirit, to turn from ourselves through confession, to die to ourselves so we might turn to Christ, and live in light of the hope we have in him. It is in Christ’s name we pray, amen.


Fulfillment in Christ Alone-Full Sermon Transcript

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PASTOR FORREST SHORT

SCRIPTURE READING

PHILIPPIANS 3:1-11

“Finally, my brothers,[a] rejoice in the Lord. To write the same things to you is no trouble to me and is safe for you.

2 Look out for the dogs, look out for the evildoers, look out for those who mutilate the flesh.3 For we are the circumcision, who worship by the Spirit of God and glory in Christ Jesus and put no confidence in the flesh— 4 though I myself have reason for confidence in the flesh also. If anyone else thinks he has reason for confidence in the flesh, I have more:5 circumcised on the eighth day, of the people of Israel, of the tribe of Benjamin, a Hebrew of Hebrews; as to the law, a Pharisee; 6 as to zeal, a persecutor of the church; as to righteousness under the law, blameless. 7 But whatever gain I had, I counted as loss for the sake of Christ. 8 Indeed, I count everything as loss because of the surpassing worth of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord. For his sake I have suffered the loss of all things and count them as rubbish, in order that I may gain Christ 9 and be found in him, not having a righteousness of my own that comes from the law, but that which comes through faith in Christ, the righteousness from God that depends on faith— 10 that I may know him and the power of his resurrection, and may share his sufferings, becoming like him in his death,11 that by any means possible I may attain the resurrection from the dead.”

Well, good morning. My name’s Forrest, I’m one of the pastors here. And, welcome on time change Sunday. Aren’t you excited about time change Sunday? I’m super thankful, I know it’s very helpful to all of the farms that we have, so I’m, I’m grateful for time change Sunday. Not really, I know, I am grateful for it, but I know it’s hard getting up, so I’m glad you guys are here. Why don’t we pray, and then we’ll jump right into it.

Lord, thank you this morning for your word, thank you for your goodness to us. Lord, thank you that we have an invitation this morning in this text, to respond to the very thing we were created for. Lord, that we might know you. Lord, that we might count everything as loss, because of the surpassing worth of knowing you. Lord, I pray this morning, as we come to this familiar text, that it wouldn’t be a text that just feels rote, feels like we’ve heard this maybe one too many times, but, Lord, by your Spirit, would you open our eyes, and our ears to hear and to see the good news in your Word, and respond to the invitation you’ve given us in it. We ask in Jesus’ name, amen.

Well, one of the things that is true of humans that I think we’d all agree with, is that humans are fundamentally searching creatures. From the time we are born, we are searching for fulfillment, for joy, for satisfaction. Think about, perhaps, if you have kids, or you were a kid and you remember this, the first time that you give a kid a piece of candy, or ice cream, or some type of sweet. It’s like they come to life in that moment, right? When you give them that, their eyes get big, I’ve never tasted anything like this. Almost the expression of, this, this is what I was created for, this right here.

Or, you think about movies or cartoons that kids are known to watch over and over and over again, right? They want to see the same movie over and over again, because there’s something there that they’re connecting with. There’s something there that is satisfying, at least, temporarily. We are fundamentally searching creatures. And, left unchecked, that desire in us continues, and we naturally try to stuff our lives with things, to satisfy that longing, that desire. So, we try to stuff our lives full of things that break, and full of things that get lost, and full of things that get old, and rusty. And, we try to fill our lives with people, people that we hope will complete our longings and desires. And, as time progresses, we’re continually, and perpetually left wanting. It doesn’t quite do it. We attain it, and then we realize it doesn’t quite do it. That might be you, this morning. It’s certainly me, in areas in my life.

So, why do these things not satisfy? Why do they not fulfill in the way we hope, in the way we desire? Proverbs 4:23, says, “Keep your heart with all vigilance, for from it flow the springs of life.” So, the heart that is spoken of here, this is talking about something more than the blood pumping organ that’s in our chest. We know, intuitively, that there is more to us than just flesh and bones. We know that the heart, essentially, we use language like, “that’s the real us,” “that’s really who we are.” And, I think we’re touching on something that’s biblical. This is what Proverbs 4:23 is saying. It’s saying, guard your heart, or keep your heart, for form it flows the springs of life. All of life flow from the heart, the seat of the will and emotions.

We know that the heart is the real us. Or, we would not talk about things like justice, and love, and longing. These things wouldn’t just naturally flow out of us, when we come into a romantic relationship, right? When we’re in those relationships, one of the things that we express, is that we feel known. We express our longing, we express our heart. But, the heart is complex, it’s deep, it’s intricate. So intricate, and so deep, and so complex, that fading, rusty things, or imperfect people cannot meet the perpetual longing of our hearts. This is why Ephesians 1:18 says, “We must have the eyes of our hearts enlightened, that you may know.” And then, it goes to essentially say, the hope of Christ.

It’s funny language there, isn’t it? The eyes of our heart need to be opened. This is what has to happen in us for us to find what it is we’re longing for, form the time we are born. Augustine, the church father, put it this way, famously. “Because you have made us for yourself, and our hearts are restless, until they find their rest in thee.” We sang it this morning, right? “Lord, let me hide myself in thee.” This is the longing of the believer to know Christ, to hide in Christ.

And, there are two short parables that point us to what we were made for. In our text this morning, they set our text up. They’re in Matthew 13:44-46. Just three verses, two parables, and three verses, and they’re both bringing about the same reality, bringing the same thing to the service …

“The kingdom of heaven is like treasure hidden in a field, which a man found and covered up. Then, in his joy, he goes and sells all that he has and buys the field.”

So, there’s a man who’s wandering in a field, it’s not his field, he finds this incredible treasure, and then he goes and he covers it back up, and then he goes and sells everything he has to buy that field. And then, the parable of the pearl of great value ...

“Again, the kingdom of heaven is like a merchant in search of fine pearls, who, on finding one pearl of great value, went and sold all that he had, and bought it.”

He’s searching, he is a dealer of pearls, and he finds the one, and he sells everything for it. This is meant to bring about the reality of the kingdom, and kingship that we are searching for, from the time we are born. And, when we find it, when the eyes of our heart are opened to it, we gladly sell everything, that we might attain it. We realize that the candy we had as kids, and the cartoon movies, and the relationships, that those things are not bad in and of themselves, but those things are meant to point us to what we were really created for. And, when we truly find that, we sell all we have to gain it.

So, this morning, this sets up our text. This is what Paul says. The crux of this verse, or, excuse me, of these verses, is verse 8 ...

“Indeed, I count everything as loss, because of the surpassing worth of knowing Christ Jesus, my Lord. For his sake, I’ve suffered the loss of all things, and count them as rubbish, in order that I might gain Christ.”

This is the heart of our text this morning. Now, this is a rich, I would love to take two months just to unpack this text. So, there’s no way we’re going to be able to touch all of this. But, this is the heart of what we’re going to unpack this morning. And, the first thing we see in the text, is the wrong kind of confidence, the wrong kind of confidence. And then, we’re going to look at the right kind of loss. And, finally, we’re going to look at the best kind of knowing.

THE WRONG KIND OF CONFIDENCE

So, first, the wrong kind of confidence. Look at verses 1-3.

“Finally, my brothers,[a] rejoice in the Lord. To write the same things to you is no trouble to me and is safe for you.

2 Look out for the dogs, look out for the evildoers, look out for those who mutilate the flesh.3 For we are the circumcision, who worship by the Spirit of God and glory in Christ Jesus and put no confidence in the flesh— ...“

We put no confidence in the flesh. This is heavy, visceral language that Paul’s using here. And, in the broad scheme of Philippians, it almost feels out of step with his language. He seems out of step with his language of joy and rejoicing. And, the language of affection that Paul’s been using for the Philippians. So, why such strong language? Why does he use these mutilators, and dogs, and evildoers?

Because, there is a confidence, that is the wrong kind of confidence. It is actually a confidence in something that will not lead to your joy, as is Paul’s desire for the Philippians, in verse 1, and throughout the book of Philippians, that they would experience this joy. And, this joy is only experienced, this lasting, deep, unshakable, is only experienced through Christ. Have no confidence in the flesh, because that is not where you will find what you were created for.

So, what is this misplaced confidence, and what does it have to do with us today? Let’s look at this real quick. So, during this time, there were gentiles. A gentle is simply a non-Jew, who were coming to faith in Christ, and they didn’t have a Jewish background. During the same time, simultaneously, there were those known as Judaizers, who taught a particular aspect of Christianity, that it was necessary to adopt Jewish practices, the Jewish practices of the mosaic law, to truly be a believer, to truly find faith in Christ. So, these Judaizers were going to the gentiles, coming to faith, and demanding of them circumcision, demanding of them that they keep dietary laws, that they keep the Sabbath. And, if you do this, you will be truly righteous. So, they were essentially creating two tiers of Christians.

Now, what does this have to do with us today? A quick background, I think a little further background will help answer this question. In this series, several times we’ve gone back to Genesis, and we do this, and no matter where we are in scripture, you will hear us often go back to the book of Genesis, to unpack the foundations. And, we do this, because scripture is an unfolding narrative, a cohesive narrative: Creation, Fall, Redemption, Consummation. And so, sometimes in the midst of the details and nuances of scripture, it’s helpful to zoom out, and get the big picture of where we are, and how it comes to bear in this particular text. It would be like walking in the middle of a movie, and not knowing what has come before. You would be lost in the midst of the movie. So, we do that, at times, just to make sure we’re tracking with the overall grand narrative, the biblical narrative of scripture.

So, as we go back to Genesis, again, remember we’ve covered that creation was this canvas for God’s glory, that God in his goodness, and in his creativity, and out of overflow of all that he is, all of his beauty, all of his goodness, he creates. And, creation is good. We read about this in Genesis 1 and 2. It’s beautiful, we’re walking with God in the garden. Genesis 3 comes, and death enters in, the fall, through the fall of humanity, who rebels against God. And then, there’s this continuing unfolding narrative from the time of the fall, where things are getting worse and worse.

In Genesis 6 [BREAK] … continues, God looks at the world, and he grieves at the condition of the world. In Genesis chapter 8, he sends a flood. This flood comes, and in the midst of the flood, it wipes out most of humanity, but God keeps for himself a people, that this plan of redemption might continue on. And then, in Chapter 11, someone invents a brick, which seems insignificant, but this was a massive architectural leap. And so, what they did immediately with this brick, is they said, we will build a city for ourselves. We will build a tower to heaven. In other words, the rebellion continues. It’s not for God, but for themselves, this beginning of architecture and city structure. So, it fills people with pride, and arrogance.

So, at this point, humanity’s barely holding on in the story, and we’ve got … if we didn’t know God is good, sovereign, and has a plan of redemption, we would think, this probably isn’t going to end well. But, God is good, God is sovereign, and so we ask how will God respond? Well, in Genesis 12:1, God calls a man to himself named Abraham. And, Abraham, God announced to Abraham that he will bless the world through his lineage. He will bless the world, all of this mess and brokenness and fallen-ness, that it’s being redeemed through your lineage, Abraham. There will be a new family, and a new humanity that will come from your line.

And, these people, this new humanity in the midst of this fallen world, they will not be about themselves. They will not be about building a city for themselves. They will be about my glory. They won’t be filled with pride and arrogance, they will exist for me, and for the good of the world. And then, in Genesis 17:9, to mark off these people from the rest of the world, a distinct people, a holy people, God tells them to keep my commandments, and then he gives them this sign of circumcision. If you’re not sure what that is, ask Pastor Matt afterwards, he’ll explain that to you.

On the 8th day, you are to circumcise the children, the male children. And, this is a, this is to mark you off from the rest of the world. These are a people made for me. But, it’s interesting, as you read on, the language starts to change. In Deuteronomy 30:6, it says, “The Lord,” it’s speaking of this coming promise ...

“The Lord will circumcise your hearts.”

The Lord will circumcise your hearts. And then, in Ezekiel, 36:26-17 ...

“Your hearts of stone will be exchanged for hearts of flesh.”

Now, the Old Testament saints didn’t have all the light that we did. They knew something good was coming, they didn’t know what that would look like, exactly, but they knew it was coming. So, to the readers, flesh carried the idea of circumcision, with it. So, the Lord is going to circumcise our hearts, he is going to do something new. The day is coming, where the Lord will do something new.

Fast forward a couple thousand years to Philippians 3. A couple thousand years after Abraham, Jesus comes through Abraham’s descendants, and the first words out of his mouth in the sermon on the mount, are what? Blessed are you, right? The continuation of the promise through Abraham, that I will make for myself a people, they will be for me, they will not live for me, but they will live for what they were created for, and their hearts will be hearts of flesh, they will be soft towards me, they will hear my words, and they will be obedient, and they will love me with all their heart, soul, mind, and strength. I am doing a new thing, I’ve come to fulfill the law for all people.

So, this is where we are, in the grand narrative of scripture. Now, do you see why the Judaizers have confidence in the wrong thing? We are to have no confidence in the flesh. Jesus has come to fulfill the law, it’s not through outward signs, it’s not through circumcision, but through circumcision of the hearts. So, when the Judaizers come along and start preaching circumcision and law keeping as the means of salvation, they’re going backwards, against the grain of what God is doing.

They were not made for that. This is not the treasure your heart is searching for. And, this is why he uses such strong language. They are dogs, they are evildoers, they are mutilators. But, the true people of God worship God by his Spirit. The new mark of the believer is not circumcision, but the spirit of God, at work in us. We put no confidence in the flesh.

Now, how does this play out for us, what does that look like today? Cause, we’re saying, you know, we’re not running around telling people to follow the Old Testament dietary laws, and circumcision. What’s the overlap here, for us? Well, there’s a lot that can be said about that, but I want to kind of pinpoint it to a couple of things.

One, is we, and I believe they’ll be up on the screen, we put our trust in religious behavior, we put our trust in religious behavior, and our means of attaining salvation, our means of attaining salvation. So, we put our trust in religious behaviors. Pretty straight forward, right? If we check off the boxes, then, somehow, we are earning our salvation, it’s very easy for us to fall into this, right? So, there was one preacher that said, when I asked someone if they were a believer, and they responded with, “I’m doing my best,” I knew that they did not understand Christianity at all, right? Because, they did not understand that this was something that was not about their religious behavior. Their salvation was not in their religious behavior, but it was in the work of Christ.

And, our means of attaining salvation, now, this can play out a lot of different ways. If you remember Genesis, and they made the bricks, and we’re going to build a city for ourselves. So, they had this knowledge, they had this gifting, and they thought, now we can build our salvation. We do the same thing, don’t we? Through our gifting, the thing that I desire most, I can have for myself through my gifting. It is my means of attaining salvation.

And then, there’s, kind of, beneath that, is a way this plays out in daily life, which I think is really important for us as a body, if we’re going to continue to see people come to know Christ, to see people turn from themselves and turn to faith in Christ. That is, we create unnecessary barriers to Christ. Specifically, we become watch dogs rather than shepherds.

So, particularly in churches, we, some of the feedback we get as a church about all of you, is that, man, you guys really love scripture, you know, teaching is a strongpoint for you all. And, that’s beautiful, we celebrate that. You’ve got a lot of really smart people who know theology, and we’re super thankful for that. But, we have to guard against, as a body, is that we don’t become more watch dogs than shepherds. Because, the more we dig in, the more we come to deep convictions about doctrine and scripture, which we should, Paul tells Timothy, watch your doctrine closely, so we’re not saying give it a pass. We’re saying, as people come to Christ, we cannot expect them to articulate it the way we understand it.

I can tell you, when I came to faith in Christ, I literally, when I tell you I knew nothing, I knew nothing. I was surprised that the Old and the New Testament were in the same book. I thought they were two different things. That’s how much I knew about the Bible. I knew nothing of it, I wasn’t raised in a Christian home. I couldn’t articulate an order of salvation to save my life, I didn’t even know what that was, right? But, we have these deep convictions about it, and if we expect people to come up giving us the correct order of salvation, we are creating barriers to Christ. We grow in that throughout our lives, but if we expect people to have that when they come in, we will see many people walk right out the back door or Emmaus.

We cannot be watch dogs, we must be shepherds. We cannot create two levels of Christians, we must point people graciously to Christ. Let’s be honest, we’re probably not as smart as we think we are. If I was to say, talk about the trinity for a minute, one minute straight, go. There would probably be, like, 30 seconds of heresy in it. Right? Because, this deep, nuanced stuff that you dig into and study your entire life. When you’re in a gospel community and a new believer, an unbeliever speaks up and they posit something that they believe is true, and it’s decidedly not, how do we respond? Are we watch dogs in that moment, or are we shepherds?

We have a great desire to see people come to know Christ, people go from darkness to light. And, if we have a culture of being watch dogs, that will not happen here. Do you know what we’ll get? We’ll get more smart people. I love all you smart people, I love you all. I’m saying we need people who desperately desire Christ, and we need to shepherd them to Christ. And then, let’s do a lifetime of learning together, right? You guys with me? Alright.

THE RIGHT KIND OF LOSS

Now, let’s watch Paul shepherd people to Christ. Verses 4-8, so, he says, put no confidence in the flesh, in verse 3 …

“... 4 though I myself have reason for confidence in the flesh also. If anyone else thinks he has reason for confidence in the flesh, I have more:5 circumcised on the eighth day, of the people of Israel, of the tribe of Benjamin, a Hebrew of Hebrews; as to the law, a Pharisee; 6 as to zeal, a persecutor of the church; as to righteousness under the law, blameless …”

Paul says, if I play your game, I’m going to win. You’re playing backyard football, and I played in the NFL. And, if I play, I’m going to smoke you guys. And, I’m telling you, don’t have confidence in that. Don’t have confidence. And then, he lays out his Jewish pedigree. Circumcised on the eighth day … we’ve been over that, it’s a Jewish practice. Of the people of Israel … people, there, is genos, the Greek word genos, genealogy. Remember, he was named after Israel’s first king, Saul, before he met Christ on the road to Damascus, and his name was changed to Paul. Of the tribe of Benjamin ... by the first century, there were only two tribes that could trace their genealogy back to Abraham, the tribe of Judah, the bribe of Benjamin. So, he’s saying, I’m one of the very few left who can actually trace their lineage back to Abraham.

A Hebrew of Hebrews … in other words, a Hebrew speaking, born to Hebrew speaking parents. At this point, Hellenization, which is the spread of Greek culture, had infiltrated the Jewish people, and they were seen as impure, compromised. And, he says, that’s not me, I’m a Hebrew of Hebrews. As to the law, a Pharisee ... this was a first century religious sect that took the Torah, the law of God, extremely seriously, and they believed that they could just have one day where they were completely obedient, that Christ would return, and Christ would save them from their oppressors. So, as to the law, a Pharisee. As to zeal, a persecutor of the church … the zeal is like a religious fervor, or even a religious anger, a passion for Torah and Israel. It was a militant nationalism. There was another sect called the Zealots, who believed in waging war in the name of God to overthrow their oppressors. Now, Paul wasn’t a Zealot, but he was zealous enough that he persecuted the church. As to righteousness under the law, blameless … so, before you made sacrifices, you were guilty. After you made sacrifices, you were blameless, and Paul says, on the rare occasion that I transgressed the law, I go to the temple and I go through all the purification rites, I’m blameless.

This was an unbeatable resume. If anyone could have confidence in this flesh, it was me. No one is more Jewish than me. But, notice what he says in verse 7 ...

7 But whatever gain I had, I counted as loss for the sake of Christ.”

The right kind of loss. This is an accounting metaphor of profits and losses. And, what he’s saying is, I used to put that list in the assets column, that resume I just gave you. But, now that Christ has revealed himself to me, now, compared to Christ, they are losses. Now, let’s don’t get this wrong. Paul is not saying, all of these things are bad things, or that achievement is bad. He’s saying, comparatively, it’s loss, compared to knowing Christ. It is the pearl, it is that treasure in the field. There is nothing more valuable.

In verse 8, he says, in fact …

For his sake I have suffered the loss of all things and count them as rubbish …”

Rubbish. The word there for rubbish is skubalon, it’s a great word. Skubalon. And, it means excrement … I can’t actually say the best English translation for that word. He wants you to go to that depth. That’s what it is, comparatively, to Christ. Every city in that time had a dung gate, it was this, essentially this ditch that flowed out of the city, and it was full of all the … stuff, from the city. And, immediately, this word skubalon, would have brought that to mind, that that’s what this is, this whole resume, I don’t put my confidence in that. It’s, it’s skubalon, compared to the surpassing worth of knowing Christ. So, again Paul is not saying all human achievement is worthless. He’s saying that, compared to Christ, and without Christ, it is.

So, how do we do this? I’m going to give us just three, to kind of flesh this out. What does it look like, because we’re, like, man, do I have to leave here and sell everything? Like, should we just sell this whole facility and go give everything to the poor? How do we do this, what does it look like to live this out? How do we count it all as loss?I’m going to give us three, quick ways.

First, is this, we will engage everything, so, to count it all as loss, means that we will engage everything that comes our way in life, as an opportunity to gain more of Christ. Everything that comes our way is an opportunity to gain for life. So, in everything that is pleasant, we will give thanks to Christ. In everything that is difficult, will lean on him for strength. And, everything in between, it will be a mishmash of thanks and dependency. This is counting all things as loss.

The second way, is we will interact with the things of this world in ways that demonstrate that they are not our ultimate treasure, but Christ is. They are not our ultimate treasure, but Christ is. All things in our life, then, will be given value, in relation to Christ. Meaning, we will hold our things loosely, and we will share our things generously. It’s a natural outflow of counting all things, loss. We are generous people, people that don’t hold tightly to things that rust and corrupt.

And then, finally, in losing the things of this world, we will not lose our joy, because our joy is Christ. We will experience loss in this world, we all have. We will experience it. But, in the midst of that, we will not grumble at the loss of all things, like Paul said in Philippians 2:14, as we looked at a couple weeks ago. And, in losing weightier things, we will grieve, but not as those with no hope, as 1 Thessalonians 4:13, says.

This is the right kind of loss. This is the kind of loss that leads to life, that leads you to what you were created for, which brings us to the last point.

THE BEST KIND OF KNOWING

Verses 8-11 …


8 Indeed, I count everything as loss because of the surpassing worth of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord. For his sake I have suffered the loss of all things and count them as rubbish, in order that I may gain Christ 9 and be found in him, not having a righteousness of my own that comes from the law, but that which comes through faith in Christ, the righteousness from God that depends on faith— 10 that I may know him and the power of his resurrection, and may share his sufferings, becoming like him in his death,11 that by any means possible I may attain the resurrection from the dead.”

Indeed, I count everything as loss, because of the surpassing worth of knowing Christ Jesus, my Lord … This is not just knowing biblical history, this is the kind of knowing that makes him say, Jesus, my Lord. My Lord, my savior. It’s personal. So, what does it mean to know Christ? Because, this seems to be the fountainhead from which the rest of these aspects flow. Knowing Christ is absolutely essential, and Paul says, again, this is what you were created for. This is what makes everything else, in comparison, skubalon.

So, how do we know Christ? Well, we know him biblically. This is how we know the grand story of redemption, which I recovered earlier. This is how we know the reality of Christ Jesus. It’s how Christ is revealed to his people. Christians are Bible people. We are scriptural people. We are tethered to scripture, and it is something that is our very life. It’s why we do Bible workshops, to dig into scripture, even deeper. It’s why every aspect of our gathering is an overflow, and built upon the foundation of scripture. So, we know Christ by knowing him biblically.

We know Christ by knowing him theologically. This is, essentially, being acquainted with the fundamental theological truths of the Christian faith, and then building from there, right? In our membership, we cover some of those, we cover our understanding of Christ, it’s called Christology. We understand salvation, soteriology, the trinity, humanity, scripture. We cover these basic theological truths, because apart from them, we cannot truly know Christ.

And then, finally, we know him personally. We know him personally. See, if we just know him theologically and doctrinally, knowing Christ is reduced to not falling into error. So, we say, if knowing Christ is just having good theology and doctrine, and nothing else, then as long as we are within orthodoxy and we can articulate our theology and our doctrine, then we’re safe, then we know Christ. Is that true? We know better than that, right? If we just know him biblically, knowing Christ is reduced to a cerebral exercise of one exegetical discovery after another. These are beautiful, these are good.

But, in that world, the Bible just becomes a textbook, just becomes a way of learning more. But, what brings it all together, is that we know him personally. See, if we know him personally, we commune with him as we learn of him. It means, our love for him grows, and we think of him, and we talk of him, and it overflows from us, and we have prayer just below the surface as we go throughout our day, that’s always breaking out. Scriptures coming to mind, we’re praying scripture as it comes to mind, we’re fellowshipping with the one who we were made for. It means our love for him grows, we think of him, we talk of him, and in knowing him, we live into the unshakeable joy that Paul points us to.

And, that’s what he says in verse 8, in verse 9, in knowing Christ, I gain Christ. I am in him, and he is in me. In knowing Christ, I am found in Christ. There is my home. That searching, that longing that has been happening in me since I was born, I’m found in him, as I know him. And, my heart is truly at rest, not dependent upon circumstances. And, my righteousness, it comes through faith in him. Righteousness is right standing before God. We can’t have confidence in the flesh and gain right standing before God. We have right standing before God, because he has found us, right? That’s Paul’s conversion story. On the way to persecute Christians, on the road to Damascus, a blinding light knocks him off his mule. And there, he comes to faith in Christ. He comes to know Christ.

So, I want to ask us this, as we wrap up. Does Christ look so good to us that everything else, by comparison, seems expendable? Does Christ look so good to us, that everything else, by comparison - we’re not saying everything we do is expendable - but by comparison, it seems expendable. Diamonds look like coal, power looks weak, flame looks fleeting. Does Christ’s worth have such an unshakeable grasp on our hearts that we are willing to let go of it all, if Christ were to call us?

Now, you might hear this and it might be terrifying to you. You might hear it and go, man, that’s … everything loss, in comparison to Christ? But, here’s a reality. Whether the cost seems terrifyingly high, or joyfully low, has everything to do with the worth of what you are receiving. And, if we grasp the full worth of Christ, it’s not a terrifying truth, but a joyful one, a freeing one.

In our Lent guide, you’ll notice this year, and I’ll encourage you to go through that Lent guide, it’s really good. And, this week, it’s connected every week to a specific spiritual discipline. And, this week it’s connected to fasting. It’s calling us to fast. And, Jesus said, when you fast - the expectation is that we would fast. And, this week I would encourage you to take this truth, this scripture, in the midst of your fasting, and meditate on it. Because, what does fasting say? It says, man does not live by bread alone, but every word that proceeds from the mouth of God. It says, essentially, I could all things as loss for the sake of knowing you. I set it all aside, that I may know you.

And so, you begin to experience this reality. This may be something that you amen, but you’ve never experienced, or you don’t know how to experience. You’re not sure how to make this tangible and real in your life. I would encourage you, this week, to fast and make that your prayer. Make that your desire. Lord, I desire to know you deeply, and the way that I hear, Paul says that he knows you, so, Lord, I lay aside these other things, that I might look to you, and that I might come to know you as you truly are. See, that knowing leads to joy, deep, and abiding joy, the joy that Paul talks about in the first verse. That’s how he sets this whole thing up. He’s saying, essentially, if you live this out, it will lead to your joy. And, I know in my life, that when I am not, by comparison, counting all things as loss, my joy is sapped really quick.

I had, the past couple weeks, I was sure Genesis 8 was happening again, that the flood was going to consume us, and I wasn’t sure I was going to be one of the remnant, right? My son’s house flooded, this all at one time, the windows started leaking, my son’s car moonroof started leaking, the washer flooded, and the washing machine, all in one week. In the midst of that, my joy was sapped. I was done. I was done with water, I was done with snow, I was going to move into Young Hall up here, and that was it, right? I was there. But, it was revealing to me, it reveals to me, that, in comparison to Christ, I do not, truly, count all things as loss, right? So, rather than engaging, and God by his grace has given us wisdom, and grace, and people to help. If you want to help, let me know, still got to redo my son’s place. But, in the midst of all that, God had given many resources, but my meditation wasn’t upon that. It was upon the great loss that I was experiencing.

Christ is everything. It’s not just a Christian platitude. It truly is what we were created for. Let’s pray.

Jesus, we are grateful for this truth. Lord, you are our life. Everything pales in comparison to the surpassing worth of knowing Christ Jesus, our Lord. Lord, would you make us people who don’t put confidence in the wrong thing. Make us people who go about life with the right kind of loss, and the best kind of knowing. Lord, may you be our all in all. And, Lord, we know that in that, that in every difficulty in life, our joy is not sapped. We gain more of Christ. And, every beauty in life, and every goodness we experience, it does not lead to our arrogance and pride, but it humbles us and leads us to gratitude and thanksgiving for our savior, who has given us all things. Lord, as we come to this table this morning, may we be reminded, again, again, of the infinite worth of Jesus Christ. We ask this in Jesus’ name, Amen.