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Sharing our Riches in Christ-Full Sermon Transcript

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PASTOR: MATT DENNINGS

SCRIPTURE READING

“Yet it was kind of you to share my trouble. And you Philippians yourselves know that in the beginning of the gospel, when I left Macedonia, no church entered into partnership with me in giving and receiving, except you only. Even in Thessalonica you sent me help for my needs once and again. Not that I seek the gift, but I seek the fruit that increases to your credit. I have received full payment, and more. I am well supplied, having received from Epaphroditus the gifts you sent, a fragrant offering, a sacrifice acceptable and pleasing to God. And my God will supply every need of yours according to his riches in glory in Christ Jesus. To our God and Father be glory forever and ever. Amen. Greet every saint in Christ Jesus. The brothers who are with me greet you. All the saints greet you, especially those of Caesar’s household. The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with your spirit.”

—Philippians 4:14–23 ESV

INTRO

Well, I’m back again. Well, today we get to finish our series in Philippians, and what’s interesting as we hit this last section, it’s easy, sometimes, to read scripture and to go, oh, are these just kind of some historical factoids at the end of a book? Isn’t that nice. But, what we’re going to see, is that Paul actually ends this letter in the same way that he actually began the letter, with the theme of partnership in the gospel, specifically this idea of stewardship. Stewardship. It may be a word you’ve heard before, which means, essentially, how we use our time, talent, and treasure, to bless and glorify God, to bless others.

One of the things that I think will help, a story that I once heard that will help us get, kind of, the thrust of this text, as Paul is ending this letter to the Philippian church. It’s a story I once heard about a boy, and his grandma, and a few other family members. And, the boy and his grandma, they decided to play Monopoly as a family, which - pastorally - I never advise families to play Monopoly together. It always ends up with someone at 1 a.m. calling grandma a cheater, and calling grandpa a liar. But, anyways, as they played the game, the boy was intense. He was intense, and he was lapping everyone around the board, he was gobbling up all the properties that he could get. And, he was kind of haughty about it the entire time, kind of in everyone’s face. And, when he won, he was gloating over his stacks of cash and how well he had done, and the whole family just kind of trickled away. And, when they were done, the grandma leaned in, after the family had trickled away, and she said, now, listen closely, cause I want you to learn the real lesson of the game. The real lesson is this: that now everything goes back in the box. That now, everything goes back in the box.

The point she wanted him to grasp, is that Monopoly, in many ways, is like life in miniature. The game of life, if you want to call it that, is about more than how many times you can pass go. At the end of the day, it’s about more than what you can aquire. It’s about more than the stacks of cash. It’s about more than the property. Life is meant for something more. Life is meant for something that lies beyond the box. Because, one day, it will all go back in the box. We’ll go in a box. Sometimes I feel weird as a pastor, cause I have to, like, talk about these things. Like … by the way, you’re going to die one day. Everyone’s like, why do you have to talk about that? I’m like … facts are stubborn things. We will one day, it will all go back in the box.

And, the question that Paul is surfacing here, which is, did you invest your life in what is most important? Did you invest your life in the things that are beyond that box? What lies beyond it? And, today, we’ll see that the only goal in life that will satisfy you, is a life stewarded for the glory of Jesus Christ. So, let’s pray, and then we’ll jump in.

Heavenly Father, we thank you for this text this morning. Father, we so often think fleeting or small things of your Word, and especially of the endings and beginnings of these letters. But, Father, help us to see, today, that these are more than just historical facts, but these are truths, eternal truths that you have put in the hearts of your people, and that you are using to communicate your Word, your very being, what is true of us as human beings as your creatures, what it means to find life in you. We ask that, for each of us, you would give us wisdom in how to apply this text, and discernment, and where that is needed. And, Father, we ask that you would do this by your Spirit. It is in Jesus’ name that we pray, amen.

  1. WHAT IS STEWARDSHIP? (vv14-16)

What is stewardship? I want to take a little bit more time to get into this before we jump in. What’s interesting, is Paul - as I said - began his letter to the Philippians, calling then partners in the gospel. If you go to chapter 1, verses 3-5, right after the intro, he launches into the main body of his letter with this … I thank my God in all my remembrance of you, always in every prayer of mine, for you all, making my prayer with joy … why? … because of your partnership in the gospel, from the first day until now … They have constantly been partners with Paul in his ministry of the gospel. And, when we get to the end of the letter, Paul comes back to that theme. He says, then, in verse 14 … Yet, it was kind of you to share my trouble. And you Philippians yourselves know that in the beginning of the gospel, when I left macedonia, no church entered into partnership with me in giving and receiving, except you only.

So, Paul now ends with this theme of stewardship, with this theme of partnering. Now, what’s interesting, is that the word that is used there, is a word that, if you’ve been around churches and whatnot, you’ve probably heard this word before. It’s the Greek word koinonia. And, the Greek word koinonia means, like, a rich, by God’s spirit indwelling in his people, kind of fellowship, a fellowship that only happens by God’s spirit bringing people together. And, Paul uses that, both in verse 14 - this is what we can miss in the English translation - in verse 14, when he says … it was kind of you to share my trouble … that word share is a compound word of with, in koinonia. That, you’ve fellowshipped with me in my suffering. Then, he comes back to, you’ve koinonia’d again, in your partnership in the gospel with me.

So, what is Paul saying here? What Paul is saying, is that when you are stewarding your finances - cause Paul is here, largely, talking about them sending him finances as we’ll see throughout his ministry. As you are sending me finances, you are not just sitting on the bench somewhere as a passive observer in my ministry. That is, as you stewards the resources that God has given you - and we’re going to expand this into your time, your talent, your treasure. As you steward those things, you share with me in this ministry. You share in my trouble. You are a partner with me. There is not, kind of, I’m in the game, and you are on the bench, and you’re over there. No, what stewardship means is that God has gifted his entire body with a diversity of giftings, and everyone’s in the game, and everyone has a part to play. Everyone shares in this ministry.

Now, stewardship is the most powerful means that God uses. Cause, the question, I should just say … why does God have us steward our finances? Why does God have us steward our time? Why does God have us steward our talents, our giftings? Why does he have us invest them into these things of this world? You go, well, pastor, you just talked about how everything goes in a box one day, and it’s gone, or whatever. Why do we invest in these things? Why do we spend time? What does this mean?

Well, stewardship of our lives is the most powerful way to align our hearts with God’s eternal kingdom. In other words, stewardship is the way that God trains us to love the things he loves, to value the things he values, to prioritize the things that he prioritizes. He does it through stewardship. Emmaus put out a Lent devotional, and each week we’ve been looking at a discipline. And, of course, this week is stewardship. And, it says this to kind of sum it up …

“Stewardship is the voluntary and generous offering of God’s gifts of time, talents, and treasure for the benefit and love of God and others. In stewarding our possessions we recognize that nothing really belongs to us. Rather, everything we have we’ve received from our Heavenly Father’s hand for His use through us. As we steward our resources our grip on things loosens and our hearts are freed; our mindset is transformed from one of possession to one of participation in God’s work of redemption.”

—The Emmaus Lent Devotional Guide

Stewardship is more than how we merely use our time, our talent, our treasure. Stewardship is how we learn to invest our very lives in what matters, and what is eternal. Cause, if you think about it, what is time, but the way that we measure our days, our every breath, our every moment? What is it for? If you think about it, our talents reflect the image of God stamped on us, to make an eternal dent in the universe. Our treasure, our resources, and money, and possessions, is meant to point us to a greater, a truer, lasting source of riches. In other words, stewardship is how we learn to invest our whole selves in something bigger, more satisfying and longer lasting than that box.

So, what’s interesting, is Paul - as he goes through here - there are many places that you could go in scripture to look at this theme of stewardship. But, as Paul is talking about stewardship here, he lays down, kind of, some principles that are, kind of, assumed, as he’s going through and talking to the Philippians.

And so, the first principle - I almost wanted to call this Kingdom Economics 101. What are the principles of stewardship that Paul lays down here? And, the first one is this. Stewardship is about practicing generosity vs presuming generosity. Look at verse 14 … Yet it was kind of you to share in my trouble … Notice Paul says it was kind of you. Paul doesn’t say, yeah, you were supposed to do that, right? Yeah, it was your duty to do that. Paul said, it was a kindness that you do this. And, why is that? Because, Paul knows that, ultimately, he doesn’t have to beat around the Philippians with these expectations that are sourced in him, but he knows that, ultimately, everything that’s provided, is provided by God. He, Paul, and we … at the end of the day, we don’t deserve anything. But, we receive grace and mercy, and that doesn’t change with stewardship.

So, out of the gate, like Paul, we need to highlight that stewardship is an act of kindness. In other words, it’s not a paying of dues. It’s not as if God’s grace comes with an invoice, and now this is the way that you pay me back, this is the way that you keep yourself in the kingdom, by investing your time, your talent, and your treasure in this way. But, in fact, it is of generosity, it is of grace.

Now, the second principle is that stewardship is about partnering with people vs purchasing of products. If you read verse 15 … And you Philippians yourselves know that in the beginning of the gospel, when I left Macedonia, no church entered into partnership with in giving and receiving, except you only … Paul says that, what happens, is you partnered with me. There wasn’t this kind of idea that it’s like, when you partner with me, that you’re actually just getting some kind of a service, or a good, or a product. But, what he’s saying here is that God’s kingdom is about partnering with God and his people, not purchasing a product. Why? Because, the kingdom of God is about people, not about products. When we stewards our finances, it reminds us of that as we partner with one another in what God is doing, that God’s kingdom is about people.

The third principle in this first point … stewardship is about long term vs short term commitment. Verse 16, he says this … Even in Thessalonica you sent me help for my needs once and again. Now, if you go back to Philippi when it was actually planted - this church that Paul is writing to here - if you go back to Acts 16, you can read the account of when Paul actually planted that church. Then, if you continue on to Acts 17, you’ll read about how after he left Philippi, Paul went on to Thessalonica, and there he planted a church, and as he was there, it was actually - it seems to be - slow going. Imagine that, the book of Acts with a slow growing church. We always think that it’s, like, explosive growth in the book of Acts, but Paul was actually there for quite a while. And he says, while I was there, right after you became Christians, you had no working categories or anything, at this point you joined in with me, and for the long term you invested what God was doing there.

Now, why is that important with stewardship? Because, often, this is actually what genuine gospel transformation looks like. It looks like slow, long term growth. One of the things that i think we miss sometimes is how much in scripture, especially if you look at the parables of Jesus, how does he describe growth? How does he describe the expansion of the kingdom? He uses agrarian examples, right? It’s like fruit growing, it’s like the grass growing. And, whoever thought it was exciting to go out and go, I’m going to go out and watch the grass grow today, right? This is going to be really exciting. The fact, is that growth is slow, and it happens many times over long seasons, and of course, just like when we grow and we have these sudden, kind of overnight, like, your four year old suddenly goes through a new size of shoes of whatnot, and you have these explosive points of growth, overall those are kind of blips, and overall it’s just a slow trajectory of steady growth.

But, often, we lose the value in that. But, stewardship and committing stewarding over time, for the long term, helps us to hold on to that. Stewardship makes us think long term versus short term, cultivating in us a healthy patience and a trust that God is at work. So, what is stewardship? It’s the call to invest our whole lives towards something bigger than ourselves. Stewardship is about practicing generosity versus presuming generosity, partnering with people versus purchasing products, and it’s about long term versus short term commitment. So, that is what stewardship is. But what motivates, or why, do we steward?

II. THE MOTIVATION OF STEWARDSHIP (vv17-18)

The motivation of stewardship. Paul is very careful in how he phrases verse 17. Look at verse 17, it’s actually, at first, if you read it and you think about what does he mean here, it’s a little bit confusing on the surface … Not that I seek the gift, but I seek the fruit that increases to your credit … So, Paul says, I don’t seek the gift, I don’t seek these finances from you, but I’m seeking fruit that increases to your credit. Why does he say this? Well, in the ancient world, the way that gifts would work … we tend to think of gifts as something that’s more, kind of, altruistic, right? Like, I give you a gift, and there’s no strings attached. If there’s strings attached, it’s not really a gift, right?

Well, in the ancient world, that’s not how gifts worked. And so, what Paul’s saying, is right after saying that when you first became a believer, I gave you the gift of the gospel - in Acts 16 - then, in Acts 17, when I continued on, and you started financially giving to what I was doing, and from that day until now, you’ve been doing that. Paul says, I want you to understand that you’re not doing it because you have some obligation to repay my original gift to you. Because, he saying I give you a gift, you give me a gift, and I’ve got to give you a gift, and then … it just never ends, right? We know how that works. We know Christmas.

And so, here’s something that’s helpful …

“In antiquity it was taken for granted that gifts are accompanied by obligations and should elicit some form of return… they did not share the modern idealization of the unilateral gift, which has such a powerful hold on contemporary notions of ‘altruism’.”

—John Barclay, Paul & the Gift

So, again, today a gift is defined as no strings attached, but in that day, that wasn’t how a gift was defined. And so, if the cultural expectations were different in Paul’s day, he’s saying he doesn’t want their motivation to give financially to be because of an obligation to him. He doesn’t want it to be one of obligation. He doesn’t way to say I gave you a gift, and it’s only proper, you know, that you give me a gift of equal or greater in return, right? But, instead, he wants their financial giving to be a fruit of a life overflowing from their life in Christ. And so, this is the first principle under the motivation of stewardship. Stewardship is about overflowing fruitfulness vs obligatory gifts. Because, we receive righteousness, we don’t achieve it. We can never pay it back.

Think about that. If God said, here’s the gift of salvation. Now, when you get around to it, we’ll take out a 30 year mortgage and you can pay be back. That’s not how it works. There’s no way we could ever pay God back for the gift of salvation. And so, we are not under an obligation to pay it back. This is why, by the way, you may have wondered this. When we do our - it’s called a liturgy - the order of our service, when we get to our offering every week, we say something along the lines of … we give as an expression of our thankfulness for grace, rather than to purchase grace. You guys heard us say that a lot, and you probably hear some kind of a theme consistent with that, or similar to that, repeated every single week. And, you might be going, why do we say that every single week? And, we say it every single week because we want to, by the repetition, work that truth down into our hearts. Because, it is so hard when we live in a world of everything is … you scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours … and obligations to return things. We have a free gift of grace from God.

And, God says, you are under no obligation to return that, to repay that. And so, we have to again, and again, say that to ourselves so that it works down from our heads into our hearts. And, we have a free and a great salvation. That inner motivation takes a lifetime of repeated training, until eventually our hearts say … I don’t have to give, but I get to give. I don’t have to, but I get to. And, Paul continues in verse 18. What’s interesting in here, is he says, describing their offering, he describes it then, using language from Leviticus. So, read verse 18 … I have received full payment, and more. I am well supplied, having received from Epaphroditus the gifts you sent, a fragrant offering, a sacrifice acceptable and pleasing to God … Did you catch that? A fragrant offering? A sacrifice acceptable and pleasing to God?

Paul says he uses this Levitical language, language from the Old Testament law, when they would have to offer a sacrifice for their sins, and Paul says that, now though, instead of offering because you are under an obligation to deal and pay for your sins, instead, now, you are under the banner of grace, cause Jesus Christ has fulfilled that offering system, and that sacrificial system. And so, now you are offering to express the grace that you have received. And so, now you are offering to God. And so, the next principle. Stewardship is about pleasing God vs placating God. The Spirit of God has given us a desire to preach the gospel with our wallets, our schedule, our energy, our skills, and our talents. And, when we stewards our resources, we fan that into flame. And so, we spend our life offering the beautiful and unique offering that only we, with our giftings, can present to the God of the universe, and that preaches the gospel to our souls of how beautiful the grace is we’ve been given in Jesus. And, stewardship is a way to channel that light to God, and express that delight to God.

God has not rejected us, but has accepted us through the perfect offering of Jesus Christ. Seeing us in our sin and brokenness, God overflows with grace and love towards us, because that is who he is. And so, stewardship isn’t motivated by an overwhelming sense of guilt, but an overflow of grace. So, why steward? Because, it is an expression of the gospel, that God has fully paid the price of our redemption, and therefore we give not to placate God, but to please God.

So, we’ve covered what stewardship is and why we steward, but what happens when we stewards? What happens when we invest our lives in the things that God values?

III. THE RICHES OF STEWARDSHIP (vv19-23)

Lastly, the riches of stewardship. So, here’s the question for us. If we’re honest, I know that sometimes when we heard these things like stewardship, investing our finances, offering our finances, offering our time, offering our talents for the uses that God has called them to … I know that in church we’re just supposed to nod our heads and say amen, right? We’re supposed to go … yeah, yeah Pastor. But, why is it so hard to do it? Why is it so hard to actually begin doing it?

Well, it’s interesting because Paul goes right there. In verse 19, he says … And my God will supply every need of yours according to his riches in glory in Christ Jesus … See, Paul rushes right in and says, I need to address something that I know you’re assuming. If I give of my supply, then what supply will I have left? If I give of my money, what money will I have left? If I give of my time, what time will I have left? If I give of my talents, what talent, what time for my talents and investment will I have left?

One of the main reasons that we don’t steward, is that we fear that we are losing our riches. We fear that in stewarding our resources, that we are losing our riches. But, do you see what Paul says here? He says that it’s in stewarding that we actually gain and discover true riches, that we actually discover true riches. It’s like playing Monopoly, when everything is focused on the board. It’s easy to forget that everything will actually, at the end of the day, go back in the box. So, we go around and around, year after year, pursuing riches that will not last. Things that will not last. But stewardship, Paul says, frees us from false riches to discover true riches, to what lasts beyond the box.

Now, what are these true riches? I had to think about this for a while, because I could obviously say, well, and my God will supply you every need of yours according to his riches in glory in Christ Jesus. There you go, your riches are in glory, in Christ Jesus. You go, yeah, that sounds good, okay. But, tangibly, what does that mean? What does that tangibly look like? And, I had to think about this for actually quite a while, because I was looking at it going, what is Paul really talking about here?

And, I realized it goes back to how Paul began this section in chapter 4, this last section. And, it’s a them we see again, and again, in Paul’s letters. He says this in 4:1 … Therefore my brothers, whom I love and long for, my joy and crown, stand firm thus in the Lord, my beloved … So, Paul comes back and he says, the way that you know true riches … See, Paul, again and again, when he says I’m investing, I’m laying down my life, I’m pouring myself out as a sacrifice, all these different ways he explains it and describes it in all of his different letters. He never says I’ve done this so that then you’ll pay me. He never says I do this so that then maybe you will supply me with a nice little carriage or a car, you know, or that you will supply me with a house. He always says, again and again, my riches are you. My riches are that I get to be on the front lines of seeing you know Christ. You are my joy, you are my crown. Again and again, Paul highlights that. True riches, in other words, tangibly, is most found when we see others see Jesus. When we see others grow and know Christ.

Now, why is that? In some ways, it’s so simple it’s obvious. Because, the one thing that won’t perish is people. Eternal souls. Now, Jesus didn’t come for things, he came for people. Now i know theologically, you know, things are redeemed and the physical world is, like, you know, refined and everything. But, what I mean is, that, like, today at lunch I’m not concerned about the redemption of my sandwich, right? Like, Jesus didn’t come to save my sandwich. Jesus came to save eternal souls, he came to save people. True riches, then, are discovered when we invest our lives in the eternal life of others, in others seeing Christ for the first time. And, I think one of the things that I realized while doing this, is sometimes we forget how beautiful that is. Sometimes we forget how beautiful it is when we’re in someone’s life. You remember that first time when you first saw Christ for who he is. When you first realized the grace that you had been given. Have you ever been in someone’s life where you had a front row seat to see their eyes opened for the first time to seeing the beauty of Christ? It’s riches.

This hit me recently. I was actually at a presentation, and Larry Thomas - Larry’s here - he was doing a presentation on a ministry that they do internationally. It’s a medical mission, and one of the things that they do, is they do these cataract surgeries. And, what they have, is they go into these villages, and there are many individuals who have never really been able to see a day in their life. And, there’s a video that they showed of this one gal named Lalise. And, it starts the video where Lalise’s eyes are bandaged, and her whole life she’s been blind. And, it was a simple cataract surgery that actually allowed her to see, but she couldn’t get it. And, they captured it on video. At that time, she had a baby. She had never seen the baby. And, this captures the moment when she opened her eyes, and for the first time, she saw her child. The first time that she saw this child that she had never seen. And, in that moment, when I saw that, I said … that’s a picture. We forget so often how beautiful it is when we open our eyes for the first time, and we can see Christ for who he is. That look, that freedom, that removal of guilt that comes with that.

And, here’s the thing … when you see that, just like when I saw that, I wanted to be like, Larry … here’s my wallet. Take whatever you need, right? More of that. More of that. In the same way, that when we see others see Christ for the first time, we don’t anymore hoard, we aren’t sitting there with our stacks of cash on the board, and we’re not thinking about how many times we can go around the board. We just push it all to the center, and we say … take it. Take it, because I want to see more of this. I want to see eyes opened. And, what Paul is saying, is this is true riches. These are the faces that will be on the streets of the new Jerusalem. The grace cannot hold it. And, Paul says, your life can be given to this. The effect of living as a people, as a church, as people who steward everything, who say there is something beyond this world that is worth my all, verses in this world. It’s something that stands out.

In fact, you see it here in verse 22. Paul closes by saying … All the saints greet you, especially … Paul wants to highlight this. Paul is in a Roman prison, in the palace of Caesar, at the most decadent, established, powerful city in the world, and he says, by the way … especially those … who are in … Caesar’s household. He’s seeing people come to Christ while he’s starving in prison, while he’s in chains, he’s in tatters … but, what they see, is they see this partnership going back and forth, and they see that him and the people who he’s speaking to, they have something that’s worth more than anything in this world can provide. And, their eyes are opened.

If you read, there’s a letter about 70 years after this letter that Paul wrote to the Philippians. Another letter is written to the church at Philippi. It’s by an early church father about 120 AD named Polycarp. And, Polycarp writes them a letter, and in the letter he goes on and on in the first chapter, where he says … again, this is 70 years later, where he says, you’ve been known for your sacrificial giving, since the beginning, since Acts 16, what Paul’s talking about here. He says, you’re known for overflowing with this joy in Christ, and that’s still here, today. Do you see what happened? Their children in the church in Philippi saw this in their parent’s lives. The community saw this in their lives, and they saw that this isn’t just a game. Jesus isn’t just for Sundays. He’s more than a weekend thing. His kingdom is coming, and it’s worth everything we have, and we are all in.

And so, they saw that one generation after another generation after another generation, and their legacy was not whatever went in the box. Their legacy was something that could not be extinguished by the grave. But, by eyes that were opened. Can you imagine, Emmaus, if it’s 70 years from now? Imagine this, 70 years from now, if you were able to come here, maybe some of you who are in this room who right now are babbling, will still be alive and be in this room. But, most of us will be gone. Can you imagine coming in here and you see that all that has happened is that there is still just a love for Jesus? A love for Jesus, because they say, what I learned here is that the most valuable thing I can give my time, my talent, and my treasure to, is something that lies beyond this world. It preaches the gospel.

It says that Jesus is everything. And, it starts with how we steward our time, our talent, and our treasure today. One of the things, obviously as I’m talking about this, I always feel weird talking about stewardship, because obviously at some point it’s like … okay, as the pastor, when is he going to ask me to volunteer for something, right? And, I want you to be able to invest your time, talent, and treasure here confidently, I do. I want you to be able to invest your time, talent, and treasure here as well as everywhere else where the Lord has placed you with influence. One of the things, though, is when we do it in the local church, is that we learn to do it. And, what happens is we actually take steps that commit us to doing it, and then as we commit to it, we start to do it in all other areas of our life as well. It’s almost like if you don’t do it at home, you probably aren’t actually doing it elsewhere. There’s probably a lot of talking, not a lot of doing.

And so, one of the things that I want to say, is that Emmaus, this is why again, and again, we come back to that Emmaus is about more than just building some kind of a platform. Emmaus is about more than just one person, or persona. If there’s one persona, it’s Jesus. One of the things we ask ourselves again, and again, and again as elders, as the three of us pastors, we’re asking ourselves this. If 100 years from now Emmaus is still here, who gets the applause? Is it Jesus, or one of us? Who gets the applaus? Who’s this really for, what is this really about? And, we constantly challenge ourselves.

In fact, one of the mottos I’ve tried to grab onto, lately, is from a guy named Count Zinzendorf. I don’t know if I want to steal more his motto, or his name. But, it’s this … he says …

“Preach Christ. Die. Be forgotten.”

—Count Nikolaus Ludwig, Reichsgraf von Zinzendorf (1700-1760)

Preach Christ. Die. Be forgotten. Don’t you love that name? Count Nikolaus Ludwig, Reichsgraf von Zinzendorf. It can be my new title. But, think of it … preach Christ. Steward Christ. Give yourself to Christ. I know I used to think … and then be forgotten? Like, die and be forgotten? What does that mean? Well, it’s all going to be lost anyways. In fact, if you want to have a legacy and something that lasts, I mean, I think about, like, when baseball’s gone, the legacy of Babe Ruth is gone. There are countless rulers who were mighty, who had a legacy and a country, and when that country was gone, their legacy was gone. Your legacy can only be as big as what it is in, and if your legacy is in Jesus Christ, it never diminishes. And so, invest your life in Jesus. Invest your life in what he is doing. Invest your life in souls.

But, for that to happen, for Emmaus to remain a church that is about Jesus and Jesus alone, one of the things that we have to all put our arms around and understand, is it means everyone has to lean in with their giftings. Everyone has to lean in with their time, everyone has to lean in with their resources. We all have to lean in. One of the things in 1 Peter, I should have had it here … but, 1 Peter that we come to again and again with the volunteers on Sunday mornings, is that it says that some of you are gifted with hospitality, some of you serve in other ways, some of you speak, some of you pray, some of you heal, some of you … all of these giftings, Peter says, and he says if that’s happening, if that’s happening in the local church, what will happen is it will bring glory to Jesus Christ.

Why is that? Because we know to … we’re alive in 2019, just watch a couple TED talks and you can figure out how to put something together and make it work. But, it is a supernatural grace and a movement of God when his people, with all these diverse gifts, all these different people who have no reason to be together, come together with all the parts working in unison, and you say, there must be something else there that motivates it. Something beyond the box, something beyond this world. Or else, it just has to be done in the flesh, and then continued in the flesh.

One day everything will go back in the box. What riches will remain? What will remain? Each of us is called and equipped for this time. Don’t miss out on true riches. What gifts has God given you by his spirit? What time has God given you to invest in others? What resources has he given you to be invested? So that we would see eyes opened to what lies beyond the box.

I have to read the words of Jesus. He says …

““Do not lay up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust destroy and where thieves break in and steal, but lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust destroys and where thieves do not break in and steal.”

—Matthew 6:19–20 ESV

Emmaus, don’t live for the box. Steward the riches you have in Jesus Christ, sharing them with others, and find a richer life in him. Let’s pray.

Lord God, we thank you for the riches we have in Christ. Father, open our eyes to where we are living not just for the box. Spirit, grant us wisdom, each individually, for what this means for us, and motivate our hearts to action, not through an oppressive guilt, but through an overflow of gospel grace. We ask this in Jesus’ name, amen.


Guarded in Christ-Full Sermon Transcript

Link to blog

EMMAUS REDLANDS SERMON TRANSCRIPTION

PASTOR: MATT DENNINGS

SCRIPTURE READING

PHILIPPIANS 4:2-9

2 I entreat Euodia and I entreat Syntyche to agree in the Lord. 3 Yes, I ask you also, true companion, help these women, who have labored side by side with me in the gospel together with Clement and the rest of my fellow workers, whose names are in the book of life.

4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand; 6 do not be anxious about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. 7 And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

8 Finally, brothers, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things. 9 What you have learned and received and heard and seen in me—practice these things, and the God of peace will be with you.

INTRO

Well, good morning. It’s good to be with you. My name is Matt, and I am the pastor for Equipping here at Emmaus, and we are continuing our series in Philippians, and we are in this final section of Philippians, where we are looking at, what does it look like to experience life in Jesus Christ? And, if you were here last week, we were looking at the previous section here in Philippians, especially verses 20-21 of chapter 3, and we saw that part of finding this life in Christ, is living as citizens of heaven, and being transformed into the image of Christ. And, we went and we actually read straight through Revelation 4-5, and we looked at this future picture that is already ours in Christ. And, we celebrated these things, and we looked at how Paul is bringing the Philippian church to this kind of mountaintop reality, and experience of what they already possess in Jesus Christ. And, the fact that one day heaven will descend to earth, and all things will be made new.

And now, today, he brings us back down to earth. And, he goes immediately into this conflict, as he comes back down to earth in verse 2. And, you may be wondering as you read it, man, why is Paul such a downer, man? Like, he gets up there, and then he brings us right back to this conflict. What is going on? Well, one way we can put this, is that Paul has been focusing the Philippians on this … what… this reality that is true because of what Jesus Christ has accomplished. This transformation, this reality that Jesus is making all things new, this what… he says, focus your eyes there.

But then, he says, the number one that that will thwart experiencing that what… the number one thing that will cripple the church, and take their eyes off of that reality, is our conflicts over the how. The how of how we live out that reign of Jesus, the how of our different ideas, of what it looks like to follow Jesus, instead of focusing and uniting over what is true, because Jesus reigns, we often divide over how to live out Jesus’ reign. And, Paul says, Satan loves to use that diversion of our focus to steal our hope, and to completely zap us of all of our passion for the gospel. Channeling it, instead, into seething anger at one another, and a life riddled with anxiety.

So, today, we’re going to look at that. We’re going to look at how we keep our focus on what Jesus has done in order to guard us from simply just beginning to fight over the how’s, forgetting the messiah, and focusing, instead, on – you could say – the methodology. And so, we’ll look at why the how so often takes over the what.And then, we’ll look at two habits that will guard us from going that way. Before we do, let’s pray.

Heavenly Father, we thank you for the realities that are in this text that Paul is pointing us to. The fact is, that what Jesus has accomplished on our behalf is really beyond our full comprehension. And, so often, instead of turning to you and looking to Christ, we turn, instead, making him an idea, and turning instead to just the practical ways that we can try to live that out. And so, Father, we ask today that you would help us to see Jesus clearly, and what you have accomplished in Christ, and so that, Father, we would cherish him. And that, from that, the how’s would take care of themselves. We ask this in Jesus’ name, amen.

I. WHY THE HOW TAKES OVER THE WHAT (vv2-3)

Well, why the how takes over the what.Now, what’s interesting in this, in verse 2, Paul addresses these two women in the church. And, he’s telling them to agree in the Lord, because there’s some kind of conflict that has arisen between them. Now, at the same time, what’s interesting is, Paul doesn’t tell us exactly what these leaders – these women were leaders in the church, influential in the church – what exactly they were fighting over. But, we do know that, in some ways, we could say the issue we know isn’t some, like, horrible moral issue. Because, Paul tells them to agree in the Lord. In other words, one of them is probably not having an affair with the other one’s husband, right? We can probably rule that out, because Paul probably wouldn’t just say … agree in the Lord, right? We also know it probably isn’t because of how Paul has addressed wrong thinking, bad theology, heresy in the church. Paul will directly address that. And so, most likely, this isn’t some issue of heresy in the church either, because Paul, again, would not just say … agree in the Lord, because they wouldn’t understand who the Lord is.

And so, this is something else. And, what it seems like – because, the details here seem to be about their previous ministry together – it seems that these two leaders are fighting over how the church should go about being the church. Different ideas, different methodology, different approaches. This is why, again, the only detail we have is that they’ve labored side by side in the gospel. So, while in the past the what that Jesus has accomplished bonded them, they had their eyes on Jesus, they saw, as Paul says, that their names are written in the book of life, they saw that Revelation 4-5 vision. And, that’s what bonded them, that’s what gave them passion, that’s what united them in mission, and in ministry together. But, now they are fighting between themselves over the how, over the methodology, over where they put their energy and focus. And, Paul knows soon, the problem is that it will not only divide them, but it will divide the church, and it will ruin the church’s witness to the gospel.

Now, these women, again, were important leaders in the church. Their example mattered to those in the church. As the African proverb says, “When elephants fight, it is the grass the suffers.” It’s helpful, huh? And so, you can imagine as they’re fighting, it’s only trampling those around them, and Paul knows it. And so, their actions are beginning to take the church’s focus off of what Christ has accomplished. The gift of salvation that is theirs, what unites them as sisters in Christ, and they’re quibbling over how, and of different opinions on how to proceed.

And, I think it goes without saying that this wasn’t just a problem in Paul’s day. It is a threat in our day, as well. Throughout church history, this has been an issue. And, one of the things, is that it’s kind of counter intuitive, because I think this happens, actually, in a way that we don’t expect it. We assume this only happens – if you think about it, if I said, a church is going to end up quibbling and dividing over, kind of, the methodology and the how’s, you would probably immediately assume that, I don’t know, it’s an unhealthy church, you know, they have bad theology, they have poor structure in their church, they have all kinds of those problems.

But, actually, this tends to happen in churches with very strong theology, very high biblical convictions, just like the church at Philippi. It goes something like this … God raises up a group of people, who take hold of what Jesus has done, who live as citizens of heaven with strong convictions about the word of God, strong convictions about what it means to follow Christ, and that our lives should be given to God, we should be walking in obedience to Christ. These are all good things. In churches like this, things go well, very well, especially for a season, until a subtle shift begins to happen. And, this is a shift that’s seen throughout church history, this dynamic. As solely God’s way, we have these high convictions, this is God’s way, I see it here, some principles here in scripture. And then, we kind of figure out a way to live that out practically.

But then, God’s way becomes our way. And then, our way slowly becomes the way, and the only way. Our modes of worship, our methodology, our way of doing ministry, our way, becomes the way to worship. Our methodology becomes the methodology. Our approach, becomes the approach. Instead of it being a way, it becomes the way, and we begin to judge when this takes hold, all other groups with an air of spiritual pride, and begin to look down on others.

And see, the problem is, when that happens – and, again, this only can happen where there’s a high conviction – it’s a counterintuitive reality, which is, then, if you think about it, this is how Satan can make an inroad. You get all your thinking lined up, and you get it straight. And, it’s at that point that it has to filter through your heart, and move into your hands, that Satan seizes that opportunity, and he makes sure that he just takes it a little bit off course, in the trajectory, and spiritual pride enters in. And, what happens, is – see, in a healthy church, what happens is, discipleship happens, and discipleship is just a term that comes out of the Bible, that means that you’re going to be formed as you follow a specific way. You’re going to be changed, and you’re going to become like who you follow.

And, in healthy churches, what happens is as we have someone we follow, who disciples us – we follow Jesus, ultimately – and, eventually, we become more and more like Jesus. We become more, and more mature, like those mature disciplers that we’re following. But, in a church like this, what happens is this poison is discipled into us. And, what happens is, Paul knows this, that slowly, it makes its way, not just our way, but it becomes my way. And, my way, becomes the way, over and against your way. And, what Paul knows, is that Philippi starts with a high conviction around the gospel. And, in these two leaders, as time as gone on, what has happened, is it has become our way, which is the way. And, somewhere along the way, it became my way against your way, and it’s tearing the church apart.

It threatens to tear the church apart. Over and over throughout church history, this is why great tragedy of church history is that rival is almost always followed by schism, and by divisions. The church at Philippi had experienced renewal, because they took hold of what Jesus had done for them. But, as so often happens in at least these two leaders, it was leading to a schism, to division. Why? It’s simple, but it’s profound. Because, they lost their focus on the what and they began focusing on the how.

And, this could easily happen to us as well. Our hearts become cold towards what Jesus has done, and while burning with white hot intensity over opinions over what we should be doing. And, there’s nothing wrong with having a white hot intensity, just to hear me clearly, with about what it means to follow Jesus, how we should follow Jesus. The problem is, is when that takes the place of a love for Jesus, and a passion for Christ.

Now, I want to spend – because I think Paul jumps in right here – to two practical habits that help guard us as a people, each of us individually, and as a church from ever going down this road. But, first, I just want to make two quick clarifications, and the first one is this: this isn’t just a problem for leaders. This is not just a problem for leaders. This is a heart issue for everyone in the church to guard against, because we are all called to lead, to lead and serve the church forward with the gifts that God has given us. And so, this applies to all of us. Because, all of us are going to be called to take the what that Jesus has done, and work that out, in some way, in a local body of Christ.

And so, this applies to all of us. This is why, right after addressing Euodia and Syntyche – say that 10 times fast, right? Paul says, in verse 3, essentially, church, help them to focus on Jesus. He says, my true companions, help them to focus on Jesus. In the Greek, sometimes they translate yolk fellows. He’s saying, those of you who are bound together, who are yolked together in Christ, understand that this applies to you as well. You are one with them. And so, I’m not just saying this to publicly humiliate them, to kind of brow beat them so that they’ll just stop their bad behavior. But, I’m saying this because I want you to see it, and I want you all to see that this is something that lurks right under the surface in all of our hearts. Because, there is a lion who prowls around looking for someone to devour.

So, this applies to every single one of us. He’s saying, you know this when you see it. You know it’s ugly, you know it’s graceless, and it doesn’t look like Jesus, does it? We all know this, yet he’s saying, before you only look across the aisle or you look across the lobby, and you think about that person, I hope they’re listening right now, take a moment to look in the mirror. Take a moment to look in the mirror and ask yourself, are there places where now, I am more passionate about my opinion about how the initiatives the church should take, how the church should operate, more so than Jesus?

So, the first clarification, again, is that this applies to all of us, not just leaders. The second, is this: that Paul is not saying, how we live, how we do ministry, our methodology as a church, isn’t important. I just need to pause and say that. It is very, very important. In fact, I should actually say here, my title is Pastor for Equipping, and largely what I do, my role at Emmaus, is thinking how we navigate our changing cultural times with theological fidelity and whatnot. A lot of the strategy and the practical thinking is something I do every single day. And, I love doing it. It is vastly important that we think about this. The issue becomes when it becomes the main thing.

You see, as a church, we must keep in focus what Jesus has done. That should be our main focus, that should be our driving passion, that should be what draws us together, and what unites us, not just some kind of methodology or practical way of going about things, but the fact that we are all brothers and sisters, as Paul says, who have our name written in the eternal book of life. And, that’s not a threat. All of our names are in there, and that’s not a threat to us, because one day we will be united forever in God’s presence, and that is the source of our joy. And, none of us, when we get to heaven, are going to go … this isn’t how I would do it, right? So, you don’t want to be that guy. You don’t want to be the guy who gets there and goes … I have a suggestion … that I think you’re wrong.

And so, the issue is – and in fact, think about it – if we lose focus, if we leave Jesus behind, what is the point of being a church? What is all of this? What are these buildings? What are the things that we’re doing? What are the songs that we’re singing? What are the things that we’re tithing towards, that we’re investing in, we’re giving our time and our talent and our treasure to, if it is not Jesus? If it is not the gospel? And so, Paul says, always keep that front and center, or else, if it happens that you just orient around just methodology, then what happens is the church has nothing to witness to, except a bunch of strong willed, opinionated people. And, the church … well, I’m not going to say it … the church doesn’t need any more of that, okay? I said it. I said it, I said it, to he who has ears let him hear. And, if that’s the case, then the issue is, that what we began in the flesh, we will have to continue in the flesh. Because, the growth that will happen, will only be around what man is able to do, and it won’t be rooted in the beauty, the eternal reality, the divine power, entering into this world, in Jesus Christ.

And so, again, Paul is not saying that how we do things is not important, it is. But, Paul has summed this up elsewhere, very well. He says this – you probably know this passage from 1 Corinthians 13. He says …

… If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal. And if I have prophetic powers, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing. If I give away all I have, and if I deliver up my body to be burned, but have not love, I gain nothing …

The things he lists there, that is a very robust ministry resume, very robust. Prophetic gifting, good teachings, strong faith, sacrificial living. All good things, but he says they’re nothing, nothing if it’s not filled with the love of Christ, if what is more important is not what Jesus … the what that Jesus has accomplished on our behalf. Because, Jesus is more of our ideas about him, Jesus is more than a methodology. Jesus is the messiah who lives and breathes in us, and among us. And, if I want to know him, if we want to know him, we have to be a people with habits that soak our hearts in what Christ has accomplished on our behalf.

And so, Paul is going to give us two habits. Now, I wanted to say something. These two habits are going to sound simple, and they are simple. Yet, at the same time, the results, if we have these habits in our life, are profound. Profound. And, if we fail to do them, the results will be profoundly disastrous. If we practice them, the results will be profoundly redemptive.

I remember, just as a way to give a little bit more of a push on this, I remember when I started seminary – so that’s, like, where they send pastors to become really arrogant … No, I’m just kidding, sorry. No, where they train pastors to learn, you know. Anyways, when I want to seminary – that’s the problem seminary can become. When I first entered seminary, there was a first class that I had, and I just got married a month earlier. And, it was a class called family and ministry, and the professor walked in that day, and he said, listen. This is a class about how to practically be thriving parents, and having a thriving marriage in ministry, and how your family kind of joins you in ministry. And he said, listen, if you can get into grad school, you should have no problem getting an A in this class. It’s going to be really simple. He said, but if you don’t take what we learn here and actually apply it to your life, he said, you’ll be calling me in 10 years, asking me, where did my family go?

Sometimes, the most simple truths are the most important and profound, yet so hard to apply. And so, again, these are going to sound simple, but at the same time, they are profoundly redemptive when they are at work in our life.

II. HABIT #1 | THANKSGIVING BEFORE THE FATHER (vv.4-7)

So, here’s habit #1: thanksgiving before the Father. Paul says … rejoice in the Lord, always, I say, rejoice …in verse 4. Now, in all the complexity, Paul says, in all the pressures and all the concerns and all the conflicts of life, Paul says, rejoice. Now, you might be wondering to yourself, how can Paul say that? I mean, if you think about it, life throws a lot of stuff at us that doesn’t exactly prompt rejoicing, right? But, Paul says, in everything and always– later he’s going to say everything, here he says always rejoice, later he’s going to say, in everything, be thankful.

And so, you may be asking, really? In everything? When I get into an argument with my spouse or my boss, really? And, Paul would say, is that, does that fall under the banner of always and everything? And you would say … yeah. And, he’d say, yeah, yeah, rejoice. Right? He said, always to rejoice.

Now, the question is, how can Paul say that? In all seriousness, how can Paul say that, as a blanket statement, to always rejoice? Paul can say rejoice always, because of what Jesus has done. Paul can say rejoice always, because of what Jesus has done. He has reconciled us to our Heavenly Father. This is why, if you read, then, in verse 6, this is why he says …

do not be anxious about anything, but in everything, by prayer and supplication, with thanksgiving, let your request be known to God …

See, Paul doesn’t just say, you know, kind of, when you have a problem, kind of let it be known to the universe, or just kind of think happy thoughts, or just maybe go and kind of have a cathartic moment on social media and rant about it, or just kind of talk about it, talk it out amongst yourselves. This isn’t just, kind of, sentimental, kind of flippant advice. But, Paul is rooting this in Jesus, what he’s just said is true in Jesus. And what he’s saying is, no, no matter what it is, we can go to someone. You can always rejoice, because you can always go to someone who is there, and someone who is able to do something about whatever it is in your life. And, as Paul says in verse 7, there is no greater peace in the universe than that. There’s no greater peace than to know that the God of the universe is there, and because of what Christ has accomplished, we now can enter into his presence.

Before this morning, we were praying for those of us who are in the band and whatnot up here, and we were praying, and just the reality was weighing down on me, and I think on the room, that we are about ready to walk into the presence of a holy God, and how dare we. We can, and we rejoice because Jesus has granted us access, and he’s gone before us. And, that is always true. Nothing can take that away.

At the same time, let me illustrate this, cause I think this is kind of hard for us to live. My daughter, she’s 5 now, she does something that I used to do as a child. Do you ever have that, if you have children, and you’re like … oh, jeeze, there I am, right? And, when I was a kid, I was very intense, and any time I would try to do something, I would be like … grrrr … and I would just, like, break things. Like, I can’t blow up this basketball so I’ll just, you know … stab a sharp stick into it. That should solve my problems.

My daughter has the same intensity, and so she’ll especially be, like, let’s say building a Lego castle or something. And, she’ll try to actually build these really elaborate designs. I’m like, that’s pretty impressive, honey, I can’t do that and I’m 34 .. But, she’ll get so far into it, and she gets stuck, and you’ll just hear from the other room … aarrrghh ... and she gets really frustrated. And so, we’ve trained her, my wife will kind of give me that, like … this is where you understand her, and I don’t understand what’s going on, right? Cause, it’s you. She’s your child. And so, I go in there, and say, honey, we’ve tried to teach her, you know, you can call out to us and ask for help. Like, when you hit these roadblocks, like, come to us, we love you. We want to help you, we want to help you get to that next level. I want to help you figure out the Lego thing, and go to the next level up ones. But, we love you, we’re here to help you, you can call out to us. And of course, with some coaching, when she hits a wall, now she comes to us. So we’ll hear the … aaarrghhh … and then you’ll hear … Papa? Mama? And, we come in … I love you, I want to help, I’m here.

And, of course, over time, as we’ve seen this, there’s just this peace, more and more as she hits these walls, we see this more and more, just this peace, because she knows she’s not alone. She knows that we’re disposed to help her, we’re predisposed to that, that we love her. In fact, the other day, I had, like, this plumbing thing. It was, like, a weak or so ago, and I was grumbling about it. And she goes by, and she goes, Papa, you should ask Mama for help. I was like … thank you, child. She’s become the teacher.

Yet, while it’s simple, how often do we live lives riddled with anxiety? How often does that look like us? Whatever area of life it might be, that instead, we’re alone, we think that we’re just alone in a room, alone in the car, alone in whatever situation it is, and we catch ourselves, it looks just like that … aaarrghh … right? Just, crying out to the universe as if no one is there, or grumbling to others, because they seem more tangible than our Heavenly Father. But, in our crying out, here’s the thing to consider … in our crying out, what do we really want? What do we really want in our crying out? What do we really want in the midst of our anxiety, in the midst of our worry? We want our Father’s presence. It’s not always that we just want a solution, it’s not always that we just want a quick fix, but often, it’s just that we want our Heavenly Father to draw near. You know, often, when I go in to my daughter, by the time we get done making the Lego castle or whatever, she almost doesn’t even care about the Lego castle. She cares that I’m near. She cares that I’m with her. And, how often do we miss our Father’s presence, and enjoy his nearness. In everything, we can cry out with thanksgiving, because one thing is certain: because of what Jesus has done in everything, our Heavenly Father draws near to us as his beloved children. And, in that, we can always be thankful, Paul says. He is always near. You can cry out to him.

Now, we should consider why Paul is saying this. Because, if we make it a habit of not going to our Father, and enjoying what Christ has given us, then our lives will be full of anxiety. They’ll be full of fear, they’ll be full of worry. And, here’s the thing: we’ll begin running to one another, we’ll begin expecting the church, we’ll expect the things that should point us to Christ, that should point us to our Heavenly Father, we’ll expect them to figure out the how’s. How to solve those things, how to remedy life, in other words, to do what only God can do, and to subtly and slowly replace him. And, the expectations for one another skyrocket, and all of our energy will flow to fighting over who has the better, the slicker how, rather than simply enjoying what Jesus has given us: reconciliation to a Father who is present, and listening.

So, Paul says, make thanksgiving a habit. Make thanksgiving, of going before your Heavenly Father, a habit. Again, simple, yet profound. You know, one of the ways you might be thinking, how do I really get going with this? Well, here’s a little tip I learned in undergrad. I did a lot of writing, that was what my undergrad degree was in, Creative Writing. And, I had a professor who told me when I would get stuck, he’d say, here’s how you break it: just start writing about what makes you angry, and try it, okay? If you’re stuck, you’re like, God what do I … I’m trying to think … just think, talk to God about what makes you angry, and write. And, you’ll become Hemingway, or Stephen King, like, within seconds, okay?

So, it just starts flowing, because you’re like, wow, I’ve become verbose. I have ideas. And so, when you go before the Lord, bring the things that are right there in front of you. As you go throughout your day, it’s like you see life through this windshield that is all these worries and anxieties and complexities. Well, just, right away when you get up, take those before your Heavenly Father, and say, Father, this is what I see. This is what’s in front of me, and bring it before him, and then just pause every now and then and insert – but Father, I am thankful for ____ . I am thankful that you brought me into this life, because I know even though I don’t know the way out of it, I know you’re sovereign, and you’re going to show me a way through, and you’re going to be with me. Or, I just, I know you’ll be with me.

But, bring them before the Father, and then bring your strife with one another – because it happens – bring the relationships before God, and then remind yourself of this reality Paul’s reminding them of, which is Father, I’m struggling, my heart is cold towards them. Warm it by reminding me that both of our lives are in the book of life. And, just start there. But, ask God to change your view of them.

Thanksgiving, a habit. If you make it a habit, God will guard your hearts and your minds with the peace of Christ, and what he has provided.

III. HABIT #2 | HOSPITALITY TOWARD OTHERS (vv8-9)

The second simple yet profound habit, is hospitality towards others. Finally, Paul says in verse 9, practice the what. Literally, you have to train, Paul says. Literally, you have to practice, literally, you have to rehearse the what of Jesus’ kingdom. Did you catch that? We are called here by Paul, and in several of his other letters – you can look in 1 and 2 Timothy he does this, he says, you need to train yourself for these realities. Why does Paul say that? Because, here’s the thing, all day long, whether you realize it or not, you are training and equipping yourself, going through the motions and going through the exercises of what the world says is true, just, pure, noble. We spend every day of our lives going through the motions of what the world does. And, in fact, we are strengthening those muscles. And, what Paul says you need to do, is focus on what Christ has done, and strengthen those muscles. And, you need habits in your lives to do that.

Now, Paul says, in verse 8, to think about what Christ has done. But then, in verse 9, he says, and practice what Christ has done. Now, as I was looking at this, I was like, are those two separate things? Do I think something, or do I practice something? How do I … do I think it, do I practice … and I think they’re the same thing, two aspects of it. And, there’s actually a quote from Aristotle, that I think actually captures the dynamic that Paul is going for here, which says this, “The soul never thinks without a picture.” Paul is saying, in order to be a people who keep our eyes on what Jesus has done, to think right things with our minds eye, and to see Jesus correctly, we need practices, that picture for us, what is true in Christ. And, to think right thoughts, we need practices in our lives that picture the truth of Jesus, to take it from our head down to our hearts. It’s serious business that that happens.

Probably a quote that stuck with me the most, it’s one of those youth pastor things someone threw out there, but I can never get it out of my mind. They said, you know what the distance from heaven to hell is? It’s the distance from your head to your heart. He says, we need practices that take it from our head, and just assenting intellectually, down into our hearts so that we live it. Practices that help us think with a picture of what is true … of whatever is honorable… Paul says … of whatever is just, of whatever is pure, of whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable … we need practices in our lives that help us, and there is no greater practice that helps us picture these things, than the practice of hospitality.

Hospitality, simply put, is welcoming others, having practice, a habit in our lives of welcoming others, as Christ has welcomed us. This is from the Lent devotional, which, by the way, is available on the app, you’ve probably seen some slides for it today. But, you can get it on the app, you can get it through our email, you can find it online on the website. But, every week we’ve been walking through a different discipline, and this week the discipline is hospitality. And, this is how it’s defined: Hospitality creates a space, a grace filled space, where a friend or stranger can enter and experience the welcoming Spirit of Christ in another.

Hospitality is a way of expressing love for others as God has shown us love in Jesus Christ, while we were yet sinners. Biblical hospitality, when rightly practiced, challenges our assumptions of others, and surfaces unhealthy biases towards others, reminding us of the welcoming grace we’ve received in Christ. Hospitality is welcoming others into our lives, our personal space, our bio-families, our bachelor pads, our bachelorette pads, meeting someone at a coffee shop, making space in our lives for others as God has welcomed us into his family through the work of Christ.

Here’s the thing, so often we live busy, disconnected, isolated lives, amen? Busy, disconnected, isolated lives, and our lives seem more driven by the chaotic swirl that we call life, right? But, that’s not what life is made out of. Life is not made out of the swirly, chaotic cocktail of our daily schedules, of our coming and going, of all of our actions and our getting two things and doing things because we are human beings, not human doings. We are created for deep relationship with God, and with others. And, nothing pulls us out of the chaos of our daily lives, and slows us down to focus on what we have in Christ like a habit of hospitality. Of making room in our schedules, of literally carving out space with time, and space with space, space with our meal plan, space for others to come into our life, just to merely say, I want to welcome you in, because I’ve been welcomed in to something really great. And, that’s just overflowing out of me, and I want you to know it.

This helps us to rightly think about our welcome in Christ, by picturing it so well. One of the things, as a pastor, as I, I do get to think a lot about the Bible. Think about it, I get to fill my head with a lot of thoughts, a lot of thinking, a lot of theology. But nothing, I don’t think, over the years, has helped me actually grasp some of the more profound theological concepts that we throw out there, like candy a Memorial Day, like reconciliation. Like having my home open in a habit of hospitality. Nothing helps me grasp that, like seeing someone else welcomed into my life, life sacrificing time for others, making room for others.

This, especially, hit home for me, and I just want to paint a picture for how having a habit of hospitality in your life will profoundly change your heart. It’ll profoundly change especially how understand and relate to God, and how you relate to others. So, this really hit me in a way it hadn’t before this last Friday, just, what, two days ago? When, many of you know we’ve been in the process to adopt … I’m going to get emotional, man …

… We’ve been in a process for two and a half years of adopting Calvin into our home. And, finally, Friday, it was finalized before a judge. And, it was a pretty crazy moment, cause the judge, I was like, either she’s going to hit that gavel and be like, surprise! You’re going to jail for 30 years. Or, she was going to do what she did, which was, she declared from now on, his name is Calvin Michael Dennings, and he’s in your family. It’s a beautiful picture. And, at that point, there was a stack of paperwork in front of her that had his previous identity, kind of like the stack of paperwork we’ve been working through for two and a half years, and they took that, and they’re going to seal that, and it goes somewhere in a basement. And, there was a new stack of paperwork that says, this is now his identity, and they took that stack of paperwork, and right now it’s being processed, and becoming new birth certificates, and this new identity, and this new reality.

And, it took everything in me not to start weeping in that courtroom. So, I’ll just do it now, right? Not to week in that courtroom, because I realized, I fully realized what I hadn’t before, as he sat in my lap, that you’re now my son. And, this is now your forever home. You’re now my son, and this is now your forever home. Now, yesterday, that hit me and I was able to hold back the tears, but yesterday as I sat in my little writing shed in my backyard, it just hit me. It hit me like a ton of bricks, and, I mean, I ugly cried, as this hit me. But, it wasn’t just that it hit me … that beautiful moment of realizing this with Calvin, and realizing that now he’s our son and that we no longer have to worry about someone showing up and just removing him.

But, it hit me because there’s a beautiful reality that is underneath that beautiful moment. And, it’s that it’s true of me. That I have a Heavenly Father, who says, you are my son, and this is your forever home.

Now, I won’t pretend for a moment that I’ve never struggled with the adoption process. If anyone gets the credit, it’s my wife. She helped me process a lot at the beginning. This means I have to sacrifice my time, my schedule, my space, the last waffle french fry in the Chick Fil A meal … he always gets it. I had to wrestle with those realities. But, as we put into practice the simple act of hospitality, of making room for Cal, my heart changed. Because, it unlocked a deeper reality, by painting a picture of what it means to be adopted as a son of our Heavenly Father, in a way that I can never think myself there, in a way that I could never read myself there. My soul couldn’t really grasp, or think of the beauty of adoption, until I had a picture in that courtroom.

Now, while most likely you won’t be called to something like adoption. Some of you will, some of you won’t. But, we are all called to sacrificially welcome others into our lives as Christ as welcomed us into his. Because, when we make room for others through the practice of hospitality, God gives us a picture that helps us think with full hearts of the forever home that we have with him, that we are adopted into his family, and that keeps us focused on the whatand the how’s begin to just take care of themselves.

So, I encourage you to begin the practice of hospitality. You can begin, one, by downloading the Lent guide. There’s instructions, there’s scriptural readings, there’s questions to help you reflect. And then, also, on the sermon notes on the Emmaus app, you can download it, the Emmaus app through the app store, is out there, and the sermon notes that are in there. There is also a link to a great article on hospitality that has more biblical unpacking, or explanation of it, and then also some practical tips on how to get started.

But, either way, I would encourage you to develop creative ways with your family, with your roommates, with whoever it is in your life, develop creative ways to welcome others into your life as Christ as welcomed you, and to his. It will help your heart cherish Christ in a way unlike any other habit God has gifted us, by providing a living picture of what Christ as done.

So, let’s recap. We must guard against, one, the timeless problem of the how overtaking the what. Jesus is more than methodology, he is our Messiah. To guard against this, Paul gives us two simple, yet profoundly impactful habits to begin practicing today. Habit #1, thanksgiving before the Father. Because, it is God’s means of guarding our hearts and minds with peace through what Christ has provided. Habit #2, hospitality. Because, it provides a refreshing picture of the welcome, the what, that we’ve received in Jesus Christ.

So, Emmaus, as Paul says, practice these things. Practice the what that Jesus has provided. And, I promise, if we are saturated with the what, as a church,the how’s will take care of themselves, because we’ll be able to agree in the Lord that the God of peace is with us. Let’s pray.

Lord God, we thank you for what we have in Christ. Father, guard our hearts from forgetting the basics, and turning our life with you into an endless list of how’s. Keep us focused on our first love, and keep us at peace with one another. Spirit of Christ, give us wisdom in beginning the habits of thanksgiving and hospitality, so we live saturated in what Christ has provided together. We ask this in Jesus’ name, amen.