The Power and Goodness of Christ-Full Sermon Transcript

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PASTOR: FORREST SHORT

SCRIPTURE READING

Jesus Calms a Storm 

On that day, when evening had come, he said to them, “Let us go across to the other side.” And leaving the crowd, they took him with them in the boat, just as he was. And other boats were with him. And a great windstorm arose, and the waves were breaking into the boat, so that the boat was already filling. But he was in the stern, asleep on the cushion. And they woke him and said to him, “Teacher, do you not care that we are perishing?” And he awoke and rebuked the wind and said to the sea, “Peace! Be still!” And the wind ceased, and there was a great calm. He said to them, “Why are you so afraid? Have you still no faith?” And they were filled with great fear and said to one another, “Who then is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him?”

Jesus Heals a Man with a Demon 

They came to the other side of the sea, to the country of the Gerasenes. And when Jesus had stepped out of the boat, immediately there met him out of the tombs a man with an unclean spirit. He lived among the tombs. And no one could bind him anymore, not even with a chain, for he had often been bound with shackles and chains, but he wrenched the chains apart, and he broke the shackles in pieces. No one had the strength to subdue him. Night and day among the tombs and on the mountains he was always crying out and cutting himself with stones. And when he saw Jesus from afar, he ran and fell down before him. And crying out with a loud voice, he said, “What have you to do with me, Jesus, Son of the Most High God? I adjure you by God, do not torment me.” For he was saying to him, “Come out of the man, you unclean spirit!” And Jesus asked him, “What is your name?” He replied, “My name is Legion, for we are many.” And he begged him earnestly not to send them out of the country. Now a great herd of pigs was feeding there on the hillside, and they begged him, saying, “Send us to the pigs; let us enter them.” So he gave them permission. And the unclean spirits came out and entered the pigs; and the herd, numbering about two thousand, rushed down the steep bank into the sea and drowned in the sea.

The herdsmen fled and told it in the city and in the country. And people came to see what it was that had happened. And they came to Jesus and saw the demon-possessed man, the one who had had the legion, sitting there, clothed and in his right mind, and they were afraid. And those who had seen it described to them what had happened to the demon-possessed man and to the pigs. And they began to beg Jesus to depart from their region. As he was getting into the boat, the man who had been possessed with demons begged him that he might be with him. And he did not permit him but said to him, “Go home to your friends and tell them how much the Lord has done for you, and how he has had mercy on you.” And he went away and began to proclaim in the Decapolis how much Jesus had done for him, and everyone marveled.

—Mark 4:35 - 5:20 ESV

INTRO

Good morning, I’m Forrest, I’m one of the pastors here, and as always, it is good to be with you. Do we have any Chronicles of Narnia fans out there? Alright, a lot. Yeah, at this point it’s kind of become a part of our pop culture with the movies popularizing it, and I think one of the most well known lines from The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe encapsulates well what our text is bringing to us this morning.

If you remember in the story, we’ll kind of geek out for a second here, Mr. Beaver tells Susan that Aslan, the ruler of Narnia,is a lion. Do you remember this? And, Susan is surprised because she assumes that Aslan is a man, certainly a ruler is a man. She then tells Mr. Beaver, I shall feel rather nervous about meeting a lion. She asks Mr. Beaver then, subsequently, if Aslan is safe, to which Mr. Beaver replies … 

“Safe? Who said anything about safe? ‘Course he isn’t safe. But he’s good. He’s the King.”

—The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe

This line encapsulates our two narratives this morning. Nothing with unmanageable power is safe. And, at the same time, not everything with unmanageable power is good. I wonder if this morning, we think of Jesus in that way. I wonder, do we believe him to be powerful, and good. See, we must believe him to be both, or we will end up living anemic Christian lives at best. In every season of life, do we believe that he is both powerful and good. And so, I think in our text, in the first narrative, we have a story of Christ’s power laced with his goodness. And, I think in the second story, of the Gerasene demoniac, we have a story of Christ’s goodness, laced with his power. So, this morning, the track we’re going to walk, there’s a lot of ground to cover here, there are many layers.

So, I’d encourage you to try to track with me this morning. We’re actually going to start in apocalyptic literature. That would be the point at which you may feel like hitting the eject button. Don’t do it, track with me, otherwise you may wake up in the middle of the sermon wondering where we are, feeling like maybe I just told you you were possessed with a demon, and I promise you, that’s not the point of the sermon this morning. So, track with me, I think there’s big payoff, a lot of layers. This week in studying God’s word, I was reminded of the richness of it, that it’s so rich, that we can spend our lives plumbing its depths and never exhaust it, yet at the same time it’s so simple that a kid can grasp it and respond to it with faith in Jesus Christ.

So, the task before us this morning, then, is to see, how do we see in our text that Jesus is both good, and powerful? So, let’s pray before we jump in.

Jesus,

we are thankful for this great truth. Lord, it is easy for one of those aspects of who you are to become undermined in our own hearts, and in our own minds. Lord, as we come to your text, we are thankful that it is powerful, and it is sharp as a two-edged sword, and it cuts deeply, and we are grateful for that. Lord, reveal to us our desperate need for you this morning, in whatever season of life we find ourselves. And, we thank you in Jesus’ name, amen. 

So, the book of Daniel is an apocalyptic, hyper-political book. You may actually, what you probably know of Daniel, is - at the very least - you know the story of Shadrach, Meschach, and Abednego, which tends to be sort of the Sunday school story. But, the reality is, there’s a lot going on in the book of Daniel. It’s very apocalyptic, and it’s very political, and in the midst of it, Daniel sees a vision of four beasts coming up out of the sea, that were - it says later in verse 17 of chapter 7 of Daniel, they are identified as kings. These were kings, these were powers. And, I want to read that in Daniel … 

Daniel declared, “I saw in my vision by night, and behold, the four winds of heaven were stirring up the great sea. And four great beasts came up out of the sea, different from one another. The first was like a lion and had eagles’ wings. Then as I looked its wings were plucked off, and it was lifted up from the ground and made to stand on two feet like a man, and the mind of a man was given to it. And behold, another beast, a second one, like a bear. It was raised up on one side. It had three ribs in its mouth between its teeth; and it was told, ‘Arise, devour much flesh.’ After this I looked, and behold, another, like a leopard, with four wings of a bird on its back. And the beast had four heads, and dominion was given to it. After this I saw in the night visions, and behold, a fourth beast, terrifying and dreadful and exceedingly strong. It had great iron teeth; it devoured and broke in pieces and stamped what was left with its feet. It was different from all the beasts that were before it, and it had ten horns.

—Daniel 7:2-7 ESV

So, this vision comes. It’s identified, again, in verse 17, that these are powers, kings, these are nations that Daniel is foreseeing through this vision, that are going to come to power, and devour the world. The first one, most scholars agree, is Babylon, the Babylonian Empire a few hundred years before Jesus. The second would be the Medo Persian Empire, the third would be the Greeks and Alexander the Great, and then the fourth was the Roman Empire, which was the final climax of these world powers. The book of Mark is written some 30 odd years after the life of Jesus. And, it’s written, it’s audience is citizens of Rome, who were facing persecution and death under the brutal rule of Caesar Nero.

Mark wants his readers to make this connection, a connection between these narratives of calming the storm, and the Gerasene demoniac being delivered, he wants them to make a connection between these narratives, and their current persecuted reality under the reign of the powerful Roman empire. He wants them to see his power and goodness in the midst of the powerful evil they find themselves in, and he wants us to see the same thing this morning. No matter where we are in life, he wants us to see his power, and his goodness, and that’s what we see in the first narrative, a great power. 

I. A GREAT POWER 


So, Jesus has been teaching in parables, and on the power of the kingdom of God. I should say, remember that sea motif, that these beasts rose up out of the sea, because that’s going to come up in both narratives. There’s some connections there. Jesus has been teaching in parables. If you remember last week, Max, the last two weeks, Max has walked us through those. He’s been teaching in parables on the power of the kingdom of God, how the kingdom of God continues, that it’s this unstoppable force, it begins as a seed, a small seed, but nothing can stop it.

And, when he’s finished with this teaching, he’s teaching from the boat, kind of using the water and the embankment as an amphitheater, we’re told in verses 35 and 36, that they essentially take up the anchor, and begin to cross the sea of Galilee to the other side. And, it tells us that other boats accompany them, so they’re not by themselves, and as they’re crossing the Sea of Galilee - which was a lake on the north side of the region of Galilee, it was a lake that was seven miles wide, it was 13 miles long, so it was a large lake, it was even on the border of a sea, this lake, this sea, was also 700 feet below sea level, with mountains on both sides - not small mountains, big mountains on both sides. You can see them even today. Particularly, the eastern mountains are exceedingly tall. The tallest one is Mount Hermon, and it’s 9,200 feet above sea level. So, this means that that reality, the lake 700 feet below sea level, the mountains around it max out at around 9,200 feet, so what you get, all of you meteorologists out there like me, is the warm air rises, right, the cold air descends, and when those two meet, crazy stuff can happen. Storms can whip up really quick, and that is exactly what happens as Jesus and the disciples cross the sea of Galilee.

It should be noted, too, that the Jewish people were not seafaring people, naturally. It wasn’t in their history to be seafaring people. Now, we know they’ve adapted to some degree, because as Mark begins, Jesus is calling fishermen, people who are fishing on the sea of Galilee. So, they’ve made some adjustments, but historically, they are not vikings by any stretch of the imagination. They were 12 tribes from the desert that God brought into a home in the mediteranean.

Now, in the ancient near east, the sea had a dark symbolism, and you see this, actually, throughout scripture, from Genesis to Revelation. It had this dark symbolism, it was one of evil and chaos and demonic powers that were raging against  the creator. We see this in a few spots, some scriptures that point this out … 

“And darkness was over the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God was hovering over the face of the waters”

—Genesis 1:2 ESV

So, you get darkness and waters put together there in that text … 

Psalm 93 says, “The floods were lifted up …” We know floods are not a good thing … “Oh Lord, the Floods had lifted up their voice, the floods lift up their roaring, mightier than the thunders of many waters, mightier than the ways of the sea, the Lord on high is mighty …” 

And, what we just read …

“And four great beasts came up out of the sea, different from one another.”

—Daniel 7:3 ESV

And then finally, even at the end, even though this would not have been in view for the readers, then … 

“Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth, for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and the sea was no more.”

—Revelation 21:1 ESV

So, we get this picture throughout scripture. There are many, many more scriptures that if you were to just do kind of a biblical study of the word sea, you would see that it is fraught with chaos, and darkness. Suffice it to say, that when the Jewish people thought of the sea, they did not think of vacations, and drinks with umbrellas in them. What came to mind, was a clash of order and chaos, a place where God and evil rage against one another. Additionally, they were going to the other side, it says. They are heading into a Gentile region called Decapolis, which was basically a federation of 10 cities that was under Roman rule, and this means that they were leaving this place of covenant, this land of covenant, and coming into this - in the Jewish mind, what would have been this dark, evil place of Roman rule. 

So, you get the picture that this would have been a journey for the disciples of Jesus. And, as they’re crossing, the scripture there tells us … a  great windstorm arises … Now, we don’t know the exact boat they were in, but one of the most popular boats at the time was a 20 foot long boat, 7 feet wide, may or may not have had a sail, had oars. It could fit about 15 people. Most likely, they were traveling in something similar to that. What we need to get, is that it was not a ship, it was a boat, two very different things, especially when you’re in the midst of a hurricane. 

So, verse 37, we see that the waves begin crashing into the boat, and the boat begins to fill with water. Now, you can imagine at this moment, all of their fears are coming to be realized. The dark, ominous chaos of the water, the trip over not to the land of covenant, but the land of Roman rule, this dark place, and the darkness and the chaos comes to bear on them. And, in that moment, as their boat is filling with water and they are undoubtedly about to sink into the sea, into the chaos, in that moment they look to their teacher. They look for some comfort, for some assurance, because he’s the reason they’re out there.

Remember, they’re not  in the midst of the storm because they were disobedient. There are a lot of, actually, parallels, here, in the opposite direction, though, between Jonah and what’s happening here. A lot of scholars make that connection. But, what’s happening here is that they have followed Jesus. They haven’t run from him, they’ve followed Jesus, yet they find themselves in the midst of the storm. And, as they look to their great leader for comfort and assurance, they find him asleep on a cushion. Can you imagine that moment? Asleep on a cushion, because that’s what you do in the midst of a hurricane, when you’re in the sea. You just catch a little cat nap.

You can imagine that moment. And, often times, when we see the disciples’ interaction with Jesus, it’s easy for us in our arrogance to look at it and simply say, wow, they were really ignorant. Right? Sometimes - like an example - the sons of Zebedee go to Jesus and they’re like, Jesus, who’s going to be greatest in your kingdom? And, you’re reading it going, agh, really? You are such a knucklehead. Yet, we do it all the time, right? We do it in ways that we don’t even recognize. But, this is not one of those moments, where even in our arrogance we can look at it and go, why did they do that? 

I think this a perfectly reasonable question. Teacher, do you not care that we are perishing? Jesus is asleep in the midst of the storm, he’s gotten them into this trouble, and yet he doesn’t even seem to be concerned. Verse 39 tells us what happens … And he awoke and rebuked the wind and said to the sea, “Peace! Be still!” And the wind ceased, and there was a great calm … Jesus wakes up and he immediately rebukes the wind. He speaks to it as if it were a child, and where there once was a great storm, there is now a great calm. And, the sense is that even the water is calm, which you see Jesus’ power in that reality, if you think about a bunch of kids in a swimming pool, and they’re playing around, and then all of a sudden they get out, the water doesn’t immediately go calm, right? It says chopping. But, Jesus in his power calms the wind and he calms the waves. 

This story, in many ways, is very straight forward. We know the reality of storms, don’t we? It takes one phone call, one e-mail, one text message, one moment, and a sudden storm hits. Life can be like that, right? Evil, chaos, hits us out of nowhere. And, if you’re like the rest of us, or, I should say, if you’re like me, the disciples, the pattern of the disciples here looks very familiar. What’s the first thing we do when the storm hits? We freak out. Right? That’s the only rational thing to do, is freak out when the storm hits. What’s happening? And then, we question whether God really cares for us. I’m following you, how can you put me in the midst of this storm?

But, the story climaxes in a question. And, it climaxes in a question that feels like a cliffhanger, but it’s not because the answer is embedded in the story. It’s what Mark wants us to walk away with. As they continue, verse 40, he said to them … Why are you so afraid? Have you still no faith?” And they were filled with great fear and said to one another, “Who then is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him?” …


The opening line of Mark’s gospel reads … The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the son of God … scholars call this a messianic secret motif. All it means, is you’re in on something from the very beginning, that the rest of the players other than Christ, in the story, are not in on. You know from the get-go that this is the son of God, the one that was prophesied about in the Old Testament, that has, specifically in Isaiah, that has now come in the flesh. And, we know that, but at this point, the disciples were unaware of this reality. See, they think he’s just a rabbi, a really good teacher with an extra measure of God’s power. But, now, this is starting to look a little peculiar. They know that in the Hebrew scriptures, that only God has power over the sea. They know Psalm 107, which says … some went out into the sea in ships, and when the storm hits they cry out to Yahweh, and by his power, and his power alone, the waves are hushed … They know this. 

And, it’s also peculiar that Jesus doesn’t conjure. In other words, Jesus doesn’t call on a higher power. Like every other legend of antiquity, when they’re faced with this unmanageable, uncontrollable power, they conjure a higher power, Jesus doesn’t do that. Jesus speaks directly to the storm. See, he’s not calling on a higher power, because Mark wants us to see that he is the higher power. Remember, in the beginning in Genesis when darkness was over the face of the deep, and the spirit of God hovered over it, Jesus is saying, that was me, in the beginning, the creator. So, who then, is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him. And, the answer is, the creator of all things, with unmatched and unmanageable power, and the chaos of the sea is at my command. 

Point one … the great power. 

II. A GREAT COMPASSION

Next, we see, as we move to the next story - and then we’re going to bring these two together - is great compassion, or it might be said, a great good. Now, this next story, the Gerasene demoniac, takes place in decapolis, on the southeastern side of the sea. Again, it was a federation of 10 cities, first colonized by Alexander the Great, and during this particular time was conquered by the Roman empire. And, Jesus is unleashing the kingdom of God not just in Israel, but throughout the world. And, if you follow the trajectory of scripture, that is always the plan, that the earth will be filled with the knowledge of the glory of the Lord, which means that this gospel, this good news, this kingdom must go outside of Israel, it must go to the world, it must go to the Gentile nations. 

So, Jesus pushes through to bring his kingdom to the world, but there’s an anti-kingdom, there’s a dominion of darkness, and Jesus faces resistance from the moment he starts to go to the other side. First in the sea, and in the storm, and then in the demoniac. And, underneath this there’s a root of evil, a dark power that is at the source of this resistance. As Jesus enters into the Gentile territory, a man with an unclean spirit comes from the graveyard to meet him. Look at verses 2-6 … 

And when Jesus had stepped out of the boat, immediately there met him out of the tombs a man with an unclean spirit. He lived among the tombs. And no one could bind him anymore, not even with a chain, for he had often been bound with shackles and chains, but he wrenched the chains apart, and he broke the shackles in pieces. No one had the strength to subdue him. Night and day among the tombs and on the mountains he was always crying out and cutting himself with stones. And when he saw Jesus from afar, he ran and fell down before him. And crying out with a loud voice, he said, “What have you to do with me, Jesus, Son of the Most High God? I adjure you by God, do not torment me.” …

It’s a pretty bleak picture of this man’s existence, isn’t it? Now, I feel like we have to take a moment to do a little bit of work, because it would be very easy for us in this western culture, in this particular time, to keep this story at distance, to keep this story at arm’s length, to simply say it’s a superstitious sort of phenomenon that belongs in antiquity, that belongs in another time. When, culturally, we function as if what is real is only what can be tested and poked and prodded in a laboratory. If we say we believe in a supernatural and personal, good God, then it is no leap at all to say we believe in a personal and supernatural evil. In fact, it follows.

In the biblical worldview, the fact is, the universe is teeming with activity that cannot necessarily be tested. Listen to what Paul says here in Ephesians, and I want you to remember, Paul has been talking in this letter about how to walk in love, how wives and husbands are to love one another and lay down their lives. He’s been talking about the new life in Christ, unity in the body, some very practical things here, loving one another. And then, as he gets to the end of this letter, he brings us to what might be a strange place to us. Look here at Ephesians 6:10-16 …

“Finally, be strong in the Lord and in the strength of his might. Put on the whole armor of God, that you may be able to stand against the schemes of the devil. For we do not wrestle against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the cosmic powers over this present darkness, against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly places. Therefore take up the whole armor of God, that you may be able to withstand in the evil day, and having done all, to stand firm. Stand therefore, having fastened on the belt of truth, and having put on the breastplate of righteousness, and, as shoes for your feet, having put on the readiness given by the gospel of peace. In all circumstances … [does that include your circumstance? Yes.] … take up the shield of faith, with which you can extinguish all the flaming darts of the evil one.”

—Ephesians 6:10-16 ESV

In all circumstances. Do you hear what Paul is saying? In the midst of a letter where he has been very practical, husbands, love your wives, church, you are one body, live into that reality. He’s saying, do not lose sight that there is a world, here, teeming with spiritual forces that have schemes that are seeking to disrupt. See, what scripture tells us is that inbetween the creator God, a being with no equal and the seven billion plus people on the earth, there is an invisible world filled with spiritual beings, with angels, with demons. Some of these are in league with the creator, working to usher in God’s kingdom, but others are at war with the creator, and wreaking havoc wherever they can. 

The biblical understanding of demons, though, is not a simple one or a superstitious one, or a naive one. Rather, it’s complex, and it’s multidimensional. I know we’ve seen Poltergeist and people’s head spinning, and we have things that come to mind when we hear this stuff, but if you look at the totality of scripture and how it reveals to us the reality of sin and our struggle, it is not reductionary at all. Certain worldviews tend to be reductionary, we tend to reduce our problems to one aspect, maybe it’s physical, you’re probably is just physical. I heard the phrase this week, I guess it’s a new thing, I need to do a geographical … and what that means is, like, where I live is not working out for me, so I need to move somewhere, right? So i’m going to do a geographical. The problem is, as one really wise person said, everywhere you go, there you are. So, you can do the geographical, but you’re still there. 

But, we tend to reduce things in that way. Physical, or mental, or moralistic, your problem is just guilt and shame, you need to deal with that, or spiritual, it’s only spiritual, and we see demons everywhere. True story, when my mother first came to Christ, neither one of us were believers, later in life she was trying to find churches, and she was in deep south Louisiana, and she went to a church, and they told her she had a chocolate demon, and they tried to cast it out of her. So, talk about reductionary. I’m like … I think i have one of those, if that’s a thing … I’m going to come see you guys … 

So, we tend to be reductionistic in our worldviews, but scripture is not this way. Scripture gives weight to each one of these realities, mental, moral, physical, spiritual, all of the above, they’re all interlocking. And, therefore, there’s no one template. But, I think in our culture, what we’re the quickest to dismiss, is this particular world, this world of principalities and powers, where Paul says, you’re not wrestling against what you think you’re wrestling against. 

See, if we reject personal spiritual evil, we will be blind to a significant power at work that stirs up our struggle, and stirs up our sin, and creates chaos. See, we see demon possessed, and we go, oh, I’m good. I’m cool. There is none of me in this guy. I mean, he’s … and, when you read the description, it’s easy to put distance between us and him. What’s interesting, is that the Greek words that describe this state never actually use the word possession. It’s essentially the word for demonize, over and over and over again. So, I know there’s been a lot of debate around categories and oppression and possession, but as I dig into the text, into scripture, and there’s definitely a place for those conversations, but what I see is there’s more this influence at work that we need to be awake to.

Don’t forget, though, what Paul is saying. Essentially, he gets to … so, if we’re proud, if we’re self centered, if we’re angry, and these things are taking root in us, and there’s bitterness in us, make no mistake that there is some aspect of influence going on there. See, our struggles - this will really unsettle us - our struggles are not so much different from the demoniac in kind, but in degree. His patterns even are probably familiar. I know they are for me.

When I tend to go in a difficult place, a dark place, what do we see in the demoniac’s life, the way he was living? We see isolation. Don’t we tend to want to be left alone? We don’t want anyone talking to us, I don’t want to hear your Jesus stuff, just leave me alone, let me binge on Netflix, or put my head under the covers, right? Just leave me alone. Or, we’re in bondage, right? Perhaps there’s sin that we’ve been struggling with for years, and we find ourselves not able to see that bondage broken. Even harming himself. Now, there is a very overt way, he’s cutting himself with stones. That happens in different ways today, but there are other ways we tend to do that, right? We tend to harm ourselves through things like binge eating, or things that we run to, that we know are not good for us, but we run to those things for comfort. Make no mistake, Paul is saying in every circumstance, be on guard. There are schemes at work. So, we are not as different from the demoniac as we might like to believe.

Now, how do we see the goodness of Jesus? We said this about compassion, and it is. The goodness of Jesus is demonstrated in that he goes to the worst of the worst. He goes to a man that feels so far gone, compared to perhaps where we are, and he does that with intention, he does that with purpose, he does that because he wants us to see that we have hope, that where we, and our station in life, whatever these schemes are that are at work, that we are not too far gone, that his goodness is not present with us in the midst of it, and that his power is not strong enough to rescue us. He comes to the worst of the worst, the most vile, the most detestable, the most unclean in a graveyard, the place that a Jewish person would never go. Jesus goes to the depth with this man so that you and I might have hope from our depths.

And, there’s another layer here that’s happening. Notice he asks in verse 9 … what is your name? … and the answer is … my name is Legion, for we are many … A legion was the largest Roman military unit. It would have been about 5 or 6,000 people at this time, and they were known for their brutality and their destruction. So, we begin to see allusions and connections that would have been made for those early readers, that perhaps are lost on us. They see, okay, we’re seeing power over Rome, we’re seeing goodness in the midst of it, coming to rescue, and we’re seeing power over it, even the strange reality of the pigs, right? I mean, this is a strange story, there’s no doubt. Look what happens … 

And he begged him earnestly not to send them out of the country. Now a great herd of pigs was feeding there on the hillside, and they begged him, saying, “Send us to the pigs; let us enter them.” So he gave them permission. And the unclean spirits came out and entered the pigs; and the herd, numbering about two thousand, rushed down the steep bank into the sea and drowned in the sea … 

Do you see the connection? Do you see, in Daniel, he says this power is coming, and it is a great power, and it is going to engulf the world, and here we see Jesus coming in the midst of this power, in the midst of this legion, and he brings redemption, and he brings healing, and he brings restoration, and then he demonstrates his power. Even with the pigs, there was a Gerasen that the Roman legion had, where their actual mascot, essentially, was a wild boar, because the Jewish people called the Romans pigs, and so what they did to kind of get back at them, is they said fine, we’ll raise the flag, we’ll be your pigs. So, there’s some real connections here that would have been made that show Christ’s power over what seems to be the most unmanageable power in the world. 

And then, finally, I love towards the end the picture of the healing that happens in verse 15 … 

And they came to Jesus and saw the demon-possessed man, the one who had had the legion, sitting there, clothed and in his right mind, and they were afraid … 

Could you imagine this man that far gone, no longer able to be subdued, living among the graves, cutting himself, he is sitting - not naked - but clothed, not completely gone mentally, but present in his right mind. This is the holistic, deep healing of Jesus. This is the goodness of God at work, and if there is hope for him, there’s hope for you, there’s hope for me wherever we find ourselves.

And, finally, the man wants to go with Jesus. And, it’s interesting, Jesus doesn’t let him. Isn’t Jesus the one who says, come follow me? Yet, he says, no, actually. Look what he tells him in verse 19 … 

… And he did not permit him but said to him, “Go home to your friends and tell them how much the Lord has done for you, and how he has had mercy on you.” And he went away and began to proclaim in the Decapolis how much Jesus had done for him, and everyone marveled … 

See, Jesus is not safe, but he is good. Remember, Jesus has been run out of town. 2,000 pigs were killed. That’s no small thing. That had serious economic consequences for the people of Decapolis, and they ran him out of town because of it, and Jesus says, no, you’re not coming with me, you’re going to stay in the midst of that and declare my goodness. He is not safe, but he is good. He says, tell what the Lord - Yahweh - has done for you, and notice in verse 20, he tells how much Jesus has done for him, the creator and Jesus are one and the same. See, we are back to the power and authority of Jesus, which leads us to the last point here … a great fear. 

III. A GREAT FEAR

If you notice, throughout both narratives, there is fear woven throughout it. Notice 4:38, there’s fear of the storm, in chapter 4:41, fear of Jesus’ power to calm the storm. It’s funny, before Jesus calms the storm, they’re scared, but after they’re more scared. Fear of the demoniac is not explicit, but no one had the strength to subdue him, it says, in 4:5. The demon’s fear of Jesus’ power over them, in verse 7 … do not torment me … fear of Jesus’ power to heal the demoniac, in 5:15. They don’t rejoice when they see this man in his right man and clothed, they fear. 

Why? Why is there fear throughout both of these stories when there should be, it seems, rejoicing? Because, fear rises when we find ourselves in the midst of a power we cannot control. The difference between the power of the storm, the power of the demoniac, and the power of Christ, is that only one of those loves you, is that only one of those cares for us. See, the storm, the principalities and powers are not good, and therefore don’t have your good in mind, but the one who has power over them does. He is good, and he has your good in mind. 

Notice in verse 40 of the narrative of calming the storm, Jesus has been questioned. Jesus, don’t you care about us? Don’t you see what’s happening? But, notice that the questioned becomes the questioner, and he asks them in verse 40 … Why are you so afraid? Have you still no faith? … And, here’s where the power and goodness of God come to bear in our lives. He’s saying, essentially, if you knew I loved you, and if you knew my infinite power, you could have been calm in the storm. He’s saying, I can still care for you and allow you to go through storms. The issue is, your premise is wrong. And, I would submit to you today, that oftentimes our premise is wrong. The premise is wrong. You don’t see me for truly who I am.

Our premise tends to be, if you love us, you wouldn’t let us go through storms. But, that’s a false premise. Jesus says, I’m God, and I know better than you, and I am not safe, but I am good. So, I think part of what comes to bear for us, is when we find ourselves in the middle of the storm, wake him, ask him if he cares for you, but don’t be surprised when the questioned becomes the questioner, when God questions us. See, Mark’s invitation for us is to turn from questioning God, to answering God’s question. In light of such authority and power, and care, why are you so afraid? Why do you still have no faith? Do you see how Jesus is demonstrating both his authority and his goodness?

See, in the Gerasene demoniac, Jesus goes to the worst of the worst, and when he was done, he was clothed and in his right mind. But, Jesus goes one step further, so that we might have an immovable reminder of his power and his goodness. When we get to the end of the book of Mark, we see that Jesus exchanges places with this man. Jesus, as he goes to the cross, is now naked. Jesus, as he goes to the cross, is now crying out and bleeding. Jesus is driven to the tomb. That’s how Jesus dealt with evil, that’s how Jesus deals with evil today, not with the sword, but by taking evil upon himself, so that he could wipe out evil without wiping out us.

In the cross of Christ, we have a fixed and perpetual reminder of his power and his goodness. See, if Jesus were not powerful, the cross would have no efficacy. It would have no effect in our lives. If he were not good, he never would have gone to the cross in the first place. And, here is where it all comes to bear for us, this morning, as God’s people in light of his word. See, if we believe he is powerful, but not good, we are driven away from him. If we believe he is good, but not powerful, we are driven to pity him. But, if we believe he is good and powerful, we are driven to trust him in any and every season of life, and that is the invitation of our text this morning, and that’s the thrust of the invitation as we come to the communion table. Let’s pray. 

Jesus,

We are grateful that in every season of life, we have a fixed and perpetual reminder of your goodness to us, of your power that is unmatched and unmanageable. Lord, I know there are many storms brewing in each of our lives today. Really, there’s never a season where there’s not some kind of storm, whether it’s a great one or a mild one, Lord, in the midst of this fallen world, sudden storms are normal. So, Lord, we ask this morning in the midst of our storms, Lord, we ask that we would see your great power, and your great goodness. Lord, may we never see our circumstances are more powerful than you, and may we never see our circumstances as undermining your goodness. Lord, we are grateful this morning for this beauty, we are grateful this morning for this truth. Lord, as we come to the table, Lord, may we come believing, trusting, renewing our faith by your Spirit, that you are good, and you are all powerful. I pray that every heart in this room would find rest in that truth. We ask in Jesus’ name, amen.