Kingdom Authority-Full Sermon Transcript

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PASTOR: FORREST SHORT

SCRIPTURE READING

“And they went into Capernaum, and immediately on the Sabbath he entered the synagogue and was teaching. And they were astonished at his teaching, for he taught them as one who had authority, and not as the scribes. And immediately there was in their synagogue a man with an unclean spirit. And he cried out, “What have you to do with us, Jesus of Nazareth? Have you come to destroy us? I know who you are—the Holy One of God.” But Jesus rebuked him, saying, “Be silent, and come out of him!” And the unclean spirit, convulsing him and crying out with a loud voice, came out of him. And they were all amazed, so that they questioned among themselves, saying, “What is this? A new teaching with authority! He commands even the unclean spirits, and they obey him.” And at once his fame spread everywhere throughout all the surrounding region of Galilee. And immediately he left the synagogue and entered the house of Simon and Andrew, with James and John. Now Simon’s mother-in-law lay ill with a fever, and immediately they told him about her. And he came and took her by the hand and lifted her up, and the fever left her, and she began to serve them. That evening at sundown they brought to him all who were sick or oppressed by demons. And the whole city was gathered together at the door. And he healed many who were sick with various diseases, and cast out many demons. And he would not permit the demons to speak, because they knew him.”

—Mark 1:21–34 ESV

INTRO (v21)

My name is Forrest, I’m one of the pastors here, and it is great to be with you on this Father’s Day. We are in our third week in a series on the book of Mark that we’ll be journeying in throughout the summer. And, last week we looked at the reality of the kingdom, that this kingdom is at hand, but that this kingdom is now, and not yet. That, it is here, it is within reach, and we get glimpses of it and tastes of it, and the reality of the kingdom breaks into our lives in different ways, but it is not yet. We have not yet experienced it in its fullness.

And so, from there, to this text this morning - starting at verse 21 - we see what that kingdom looks like. We see how that kingdom authority comes to bear in our lives, and how it’s fleshed out. So, we want to look first at the setting. This is a 24 hour period, actually from verse 21 through the end of the chapter. This is a 24 hour period, and we’re going to spend the next two weeks looking at this 24 hours, this day in the life of Jesus. But, there are four words in verse 21 that I think will give us our setting for the day, and our setting for our text this morning.

The first word is Capernaum. So, we see there in verse 21 … And they went into Capernaum, and immediately on the Sabbath he entered the synagogue and was teaching … So, Capernaum was on the northwest shore of the Sea of Galilee. All of this is taking place in the book of Mark all the way up to chapter 8, in this region of Galilee. And, Capernaum was a city of, it seems like, about 1500 people on the northwest shore of the sea of Galilee. Jesus grew up a few miles southwest of Galilee in a little town called Nazareth. But, Capernaum can be thought of as Jesus’ homebase during his few short years of ministry. In fact, in one point in the book of Mark, it says that Jesus went home there, was most likely the home of Simon Peter. But, it was essentially his base for the few years of public ministry that Jesus was engaged in.

And then, we see sabbath. He comes into Capernaum on the sabbath. Now,  sabbath was the Jewish day for rest and worship, as many of us know, that ran from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday. And, this was central to Jewish life, the whole life of the Jewish people, God’s people, revolved around this sabbath day. And, he comes to Cappernaum on the sabbath, and he goes into a synagogue. Synagogue was the hub of Jewish life. During the week, children would be educated in the synagogue and they would learn the Torah, the first five books of the Old Testament. And, they would study it, and then on the sabbath the village would come together for, essentially, a time of worship and teaching during the first part of Saturday morning.

And, they would do this in four parts. There would be prayer, then there would be the reading of the Torah, then there would be the teaching, and then there would be some kind of blessing of benediction for God’s people. So, Jesus comes into the center of Jewish life, and it says that he comes into it and he is teaching. Now, the synagogue gathering was very teaching-focused. That took up the majority of the time of worship. And, there was a ruler, normally, in towns where there was a synagogue, there was a ruler who oversaw the synagogue, but it was volunteer, he wasn’t paid, and he may or may not be someone who taught in the synagogue. So, he wasn’t necessarily a teacher. So, what would happen, often, is that visiting rabbis would come through, and these visiting rabbis would teach in the synagogue.

So, this is what Jesus is doing. He’s coming to the center of God’s people, the hub of the life of God’s people to begin his public ministry. So, that’s the setting. And, what we’re going to see as it unfolds, as we see what happens in that setting, is authority is the umbrella under which the rest of this chapter unfolds. And, what we’re going to see first, is there is an undeniable authority.

I. AN UNDENIABLE AUTHORITY (vv22-28)

So, it comes into this setting, and in verse 22 it says … And they were astonished at his teaching, for he taught them as one who had authority, and not as the scribes. And immediately there was in their synagogue a man with an unclean spirit. And he cried out … Now, as we look at that, something may pop out to you like it did to me. On one hand, you have teaching that is so powerful, that is so authoritative that they are - it says - astonished at what they’re hearing. They’re astonished at his teaching. On the other hand, we’re not told anything about what he actually teaches. Do you notice that? They don’t unpack the content of his teaching. They don’t tell us anything about how impressive it was, or brilliant, or eloquent, or persuasive. It’s not even mentioned. You would think if the teaching is that authoritative, well tell me what he’s teaching! Cause, I want that content.

Instead, the text moves on immediately to the man with the unclean spirit. Which, is an impressive event - no doubt - but, at first glance, it’s not clear how this has anything to do with his teaching. Please, unpack his teaching for me. But, they’re saying the authority - it’s not that his content was not authoritative - it was - it’s just that the authority was not located in the content itself. Notice it says he … had authority, and not as the scribes … and, this sort of juxtaposition of Christ’s teaching and the scribes, helps bring to the surface a little bit for us what’s going on here.

The scribes were scholars. They were experts in the Torah, the first five books of the Old Testament. I mean, they had the first five books memorized. They had spent decades studying. And, what they would do often, is their form of teaching would be to quote other rabbis as sort of the basis for their authority. So, in other words, they teach this content, and then they would say … Rabbi so-and-so, I learned this from them … or, quote another rabbi, to give their teaching some authority, some power. Which, to be honest, is usually a means of becoming an impressive teacher, right? If we’re going to be an impressive teacher, you teach from your area of expertise. Perhaps you point others to your years of study, your experience and how you came to expertise in this particular area. You might even point to … I studied under this particular person who was greatly influential and mentored me. Those are all good things. But, that’s the authority that the scribes had, and they’re saying … Jesus’ authority is different. This is not the same kind of authority that we usually hear, even from perhaps the best teachers that come through.

And, the difference is found in this word authority

Authority (exousia) = rule, power, dominion

In Greek, it’s the word exousia, and it’s not authority in an academic sense. It means rule, it means power, it means dominion. Notice the breadth of this authority. And, this is why, rather than expanding on these specifics of Jesus’ teaching, the narrative goes immediately to the man with the unclean spirit. Look at what happens starting in verse 23 … And immediately there was in their synagogue a man with an unclean spirit. And he cried out, “What have you to do with us, Jesus of Nazareth? Have you come to destroy us? I know who you are—the Holy One of God.” But Jesus rebuked him, saying, “Be silent, and come out of him!” And the unclean spirit, convulsing him and crying out with a loud voice, came out of him. And they were all amazed, so that they questioned among themselves, saying, “What is this? … [again] … A new teaching with authority! [exousia] ... He commands even the unclean spirits, and they obey him.”

Mark is demonstrating that this is someone with real power. Notice that commanding the demon wasn’t done with hocus-pocus, or, you know, Harry Potter-type stuff, however we think of exorcisms or someone coming and having power over a demon. None of those things are happening here. All that happens is Jesus simply speaks, be silent, and come out of him. And, the man is delivered. The unclean spirit obeys.

What kind of authority is this? This is authority those in the synagogue have never seen. This isn’t, like, the typical authority of the scribes. This is a different kind of authority. And, I think the idea even underneath this power and dominion is that he teaches out of the original. In other words, as an author teaches. Right? We can talk about - speaking of Harry Potter - we can talk about Harry Potter all day, but if you go to the author, they’re going to be able to speak on it with a kind of authority that you and I cannot. That’s what’s happening here. The author of all creation is speaking out of that kind of authority. There is nothing in this world that is not subjecting him. And, while they cannot articulate it, they’re experiencing that kind of authority.

Now, this is the authority of an author, the one who we go all the way back to creation, Christ is creating. So, what are the implications, then, of this new authority? What are the implications, if this is truly an authority? That’s great, that’s powerful, but how does that come to bear in our life? What does that mean for us on a day to day basis?

So, the first thing we see is an undeniable authority, which leads to a healing authority.

II. A HEALING AUTHORITY (vv29-34)
We see this in verses 29 through 34 … And immediately he left the synagogue and entered the house of Simon and Andrew, with James and John … remember, he’s just called them earlier in the chapter … Now Simon’s mother-in-law lay ill with a fever, and immediately they told him about her. And he came and took her by the hand and lifted her up, and the fever left her, and she began to serve them … The fever left her. He lifted her up. This is healing authority.

So, this is not just a new and different teaching. The authority doesn’t just come because he’s bringing a different aspect of teaching, though he is doing that. This authority expresses itself in healing, and in mending, and in renewing. This is the reality of the kingdom come to bear in our lives, in the lives of those who are his people. It is an authority that brings healing. That is what happens as the kingdom is fleshed out, is that the brokenness, it is the balm for brokenness. And, this is not just spiritual, though it does - a little later, I think it’s in the next chapter where it says he has the same authority, power - exousia - to forgive sins. It also comes to bear in the physical. This is not just spiritual healing, it’s healing that comes into his creation, into what is being created, his good creation. It’s physical, as well.

And, we can find great hope in this. I think one of the ways Christianity distinguishes itself from all other religious systems, is that it says stuff matters. The physical matters, or as people have put it in the past, matter matters. The physical is not just something to be done away with. And, this thinking - which, honestly, the roots of it kind of go back to something called gnosticism, which was really the first real heresy to gain traction in the early church and challenge the doctrine of the early church. It essentially said that material stuff is evil, it’s not good, and so it’s to be done away with. And so, we gain this spiritual sort of gnosis, secret knowledge to overcome and do away with this evil. I’m reducing it quite a bit, but that’s the idea there. It said that physical stuff doesn’t matter.

And, somehow, this has crept its way into the thinking of the church. That, somehow, we believe - I’ve heard it said in the church, I’ve had people tell me - oh, it doesn’t matter, it’s all going to burn in the end. Well, guess what? It’s not. It’s not all going to burn in the end. That’s not what scripture teaches. I mean, the reality is, what we do day to day life in the physical, it matters. That, in some grand, mysterious, beautiful way, that the work we engage in now, to join God, and seeing this healing happen, that as we join him, that there is - in some sense - this carries over, in some way, into the new creation. We don’t have all the lines and boundaries of that, but we do know that God is redeeming all things, and as we join him in his work of doing the physical things, that it matters.

The idea that the world will be done away with, that we’ll somehow, one day, be left floating away into this disembodied spiritual reality, is just not in scripture. It’s just not biblical, which is why Jesus’ authority is not just limited to his teaching, but it comes to bear in the physical realm. It comes to bear in healing.

C.S. Lewis has a good quote on this …

There is no good trying to be more spiritual than God. God never meant man to be a purely spiritual creature. That is why He uses material things like bread and wine to put the new life into us. We may think this rather crude and unspiritual. God does not: …He likes matter. He invented it.”

—C.S. Lewis

That’s great, isn’t it? He likes matter. He invented it. It’s good, it’s creation, and good. Yes, it’s been marred by the Fall and our sinfulness and the result of sin is brokenness that all of us experience. But, this matter matters. This is why there’s physical healing as he begins his ministry. He goes right to the physical. Matter is so important to God that his kingdom is marked, and his authority is marked by healing sick bodies. The death hear, the blind see, the lame walk, other gospels tell us very explicitly. We’re told in scripture to take care of the widow and the orphan, these very physical, broken realities that we’re to engage.

Sin has broken in to this world, though, and it’s left the world broken, right? And, we’re all touched by this. We know that. Author Zach Eswine includes these physical, broken realities that we experience, in something he calls inconsolable things. And, we all live with the measure, in the now and the not yet, or inconsolable things, and here’s what he says …

““Inconsolable things” are the sins and miseries that will not be eradicated until heaven comes home, the things that only Jesus, and no one of us, can overcome. We cannot expect to change what Jesus has left unfixed for the moment. The presence of inconsolable things does not mean the absence of Jesus’ power, however. Rather, it establishes the context for it. There in the midst of what is inconsolable to us, the true unique nature and quality of Jesus’s power shows itself to be unlike any other power we have seen.”

—Zack Eswine

That’s what they see in the synagogue. This authority, this healing authority. Who does this? We’ve never met anyone like him. And, it is true today. We can say the same thing, that Jesus, in the midst of the inconsolable things of life, has healing power that comes to bear in our lives. And, while not everything will be fixed here and now, it is coming one day. And, he is present with us here and now, in the midst of the inconsolable things.

So, is Jesus’ authority demonstrated in the midst of inconsolable things? We all have them, we can all name those things, can’t we? I’m 47, which for some of you, that’s really old. For my children, apparently, who call me an old man now, that’s like … dad has left, and old man has replaced him. I’m feeling my body do things it's never done. I’ve always been active, so I spent a half day, literally 6 months ago on a chain saw, and my shoulder is now just recovering, from four hours of a chain saw. I’ve run since I was in high school, and I’m having some crazy achilles tendonitis, that I’m limping for, like, three days every time I run. So, I’m not running anymore. So, I started riding a bike, but I kept lifting weights, and then last Friday I’m with my daughter lifting weights, and I’m doing deadlifts, and I went to pick it up, and my back went - pop! And, I went down to my knees and my daughter was like … what’s wrong with you!? I’m like, I can’t stand up, honey. Seriously. So, I walked out of the gym visibly injured, and the lady at the front door, she had the audacity to say ... I hope you had a good workout. Do you see me? No, I didn’t have a good workout. I want my $10 a month back.

This is the reality of inconsolable things. You know, I’ve probably played my last game of touch football in the park, because things start snapping and popping at my age when you try to go do that stuff. These things are true, and they’re not changing. I’m not going to go back to the physical way that I was at 25 years old - that’s not happening. That’s kind of a lighthearted thing, some of us have experienced inconsolable things and ways that, at times, feel unbearable.

So, how is Jesus’ authority demonstrated in the midst of inconsolable things? There’s a lot of debate in the church, oftentimes it’s between different camps. Like, if God’s kingdom is to come to bear now, then it’s God’s desire for everyone to be healed, 100% of the time. And so, it’s faith and sin are the only reasons that people aren’t healed. But, that has issues, because what do you do with … precious in the eyes of the Lord are the death of his saints … right? So, what we’re battling around is this reality of the now and the not yet.So, how does this healing authority come to bear in our lives, in the midst of inconsolable things?

First, there is a time coming - which goes back to the now and the not yet - when all sin will be done away with, and brokenness in every form will be healed. Where, everything that is wrong will be made right, and in some sense, all the wrongs of this world will be undone. I don’t know how, but Jesus in his healing authority will do that. So, it comes to bear in the now and not yet, that one day all things will be made right.

Second, his healing authority comes to bear in this … I think we should ask God for healing. And, I don’t just mean physical, bodily healing, though I do include that. We should ask God for healing, we should look for it. We should be grateful for it when he gives it, because I believe at times, in his authority and his wisdom, he gives it. So, let’s ask for it, and let’s be grateful when he gives it, because in doing so, we’re joining with Jesus and his prayer for the kingdom of God to come to earth, for it to be on earth as it is in heaven. And, we trust his wisdom in the midst of inconsolable things, as we ask for what seems best to us in the midst of it, informed by his word.

And, third, in the midst of inconsolable things, his healing power comes to bear in that the broken aspects of our lives are not defeats. Now, how do I turn to that? What do I turn to for the proof of that? Romans 8:35-39, and it’s all throughout scripture, but I think it really focuses on where our hope lines in the midst of things that feel like defeats …

“Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? … [listen to these inconsolable things] … Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or danger, or sword? As it is written,

“For your sake we are being killed all the day long;

we are regarded as sheep to be slaughtered.”

No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us. For I am sure that neither death nor life, nor angels nor rulers, nor things present nor things to come, nor powers, nor height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.”

—Romans 8:35-39 ESV

That’s how his healing authority comes to bear. There is no power, no ruler that is greater, that can undermine his authority, and his healing power that comes to bear in your life, his love for you is unshakeable. And so, in the midst of inconsolable things, where we can’t fix them, the physical brokenness of this world is coming to bear, the sinfulness of our own hearts is coming to bear in our lives, and is having ripple effects that we cannot seem to fix. We’re reminded that even in these things, we are more than conquerors. That, his love for us in these things is unshakeable, and it is bringing about our good, whether we can see it, or not. See, there are things in life that we can neither change nor soothe, but Jesus can, and Jesus does. And, we can trust him because of his healing authority.

So, his healing authority comes to bear in our life, but also we see - I think - another aspect. There’s much overlap here, but we also see his resurrecting authority.

III. A RESURRECTING AUTHORITY (vv30-31)

Inverses 30 and 31 …  Now Simon’s mother-in-law lay ill with a fever, and immediately they told him about her. And he came and took her by the hand and lifted her up, and the fever left her, and she began to serve them … Now, we don’t know what happens to the demon-oppressed man, but we do know what happens to Simon’s mother-in-law. We see that she had this fever, and that Jesus literally lifted her up. Literally translated, he raised her. It means that he raised her. Everywhere in the book of Mark where someone is healed, this same word is used. In the next chapter, chapter 2, the paralytic is raised. In Mark chapter 5, Jairus’ daughter is raised. A boy with an unclean spirit is raised in Mark 9. Blind Bartimaeus, the beggar, in Mark 10. The same word is used in all of these instances, that they are raised. It’s the idea that they are going from death to life. The same word is used to describe Jesus being raised, his resurrection.

See, when Jesus demonstrates his undeniable authority of the kingdom, it doesn’t subjugate as our kingdoms of this world do. It doesn’t destroy as the kings of this world tend to do. It resurrects, it revives, it brings life. And, that’s what we see in Simon’s mother-in-law. Fever at that time was life threatening. It wasn’t like today, where you pop a couple pills and monitor it a little bit, and put a rag on your head. It was life threatening, it was no small thing. Notice what she does, though, what this resurrection looks like in the life of his people. When she is raised, when she is lifted up, it says at the end of verse 31 … and she began to serve them … Does that strike you?

We don’t know how sick she was, but it was bad enough that they told Jesus about it. She’s in bed, with fever, potentially deathbed. She goes from that, to immediately serving. Do you see the holistic reality of Jesus’ healing and resurrection life? It’s holistic. She didn’t just go about her own business. She didn’t just do what she wanted to do. She didn’t just think like I do when my back is out, about all the things that I could be doing, but I can’t because I can’t stand up straight. She didn’t go do those things. She immediately began to serve. She began to show hospitality, generosity. She began to serve the one with resurrecting authority in her midst, and in a sense, build this life-giving community right where she was.

When Jesus’ authority comes to bear in our lives, it gives us a new set of priorities. We’re drawn to hospitality, generosity, to meeting the needs of others before ourselves. These things are so unnatural to us, right? We, in life, tend to think life is about dominating. I use the example, oftentimes, of pro-sports. Our high school football coach used to say, when you score a touchdown, act like you’ve been there before. I think we’ve kind of lost that, right? Now we score a touchdown, and we’re flexing … I mean, I don’t score any touchdowns. They score a touchdown. They dunk on people - I still do that - not really, I don’t. They dunk on people, and what do they do? They stand over them and flex, right? They dominate. They want you to know that I have subjected you, that this life of Jesus, this rule of the kingdom is very different.

We get a new set of priorities, as Jesus raises us from death to life. We’re drawn to these things, and not because the resurrection has to be paid back. How do you pay back death to life? You can’t, you don’t. It’s not to pay anything back, it’s because it’s what we desire to do, because we have before us what our Savior has done for us. We begin to serve in the midst of inconsolable things because Christ has served us in the midst of our inconsolable things. And, that overflows into the life of one another, and the life of Emmaus church should be overflowing to the life of those that are outside of us. That’s the authority of the kingdom, and the resurrection of the kingdom.

But, here’s what’s crucial: In the midst of the inconsolable things of life, where Jesus has resurrected us, and we turn and we look, and we recognize the unbelievable amount of inconsolable things, we can begin to serve in ways that are less than God-honoring, and perhaps even less than effective. In the midst of the inconsolable things of life, we have to distinguish between busyness, and service. Because, busyness often masquerades as service. We can look like servants, we can look really busy, and actually not be serving the way we’re called to. I think immediately, of Mary and Martha in Luke 10:38-42 …

“Now as they went on their way, Jesus entered a village. And a woman named Martha welcomed him into her house. And she had a sister called Mary, who sat at the Lord's feet and listened to his teaching. But Martha was distracted with much serving. And she went up to him and said, “Lord, do you not care that my sister has left me to serve alone? Tell her then to help me.” But the Lord answered her, “Martha, Martha, you are anxious and troubled about many things, but one thing is necessary. Mary has chosen the good portion, which will not be taken away from her.”

—Luke 10:38-42 ESV

So, here is Martha, probably looking to all appearances, a gracious servant. But, Jesus discerned differently, and gives her a gentle rebuke in the midst of it. He saw that Martha’s apparent service was actually anxious busyness. Anyone else ever feel that? Man, how often do I trade true, Christ honoring service for anxious busyness. I’m guilty.

I recently read a description of a busy pastor, but I think it can be applied to busy Christians, in general. It said that, actually, those terms should not go with one another. Because, she said, a busy Christian is a blasphemous anxiety to do God’s work for him. This anxious busyness is a blasphemous desire to do God’s work for him. And, to kind of dig down on this, we go about our busyness rather than service, I think, for a couple reasons.


Now, I have to give a nod, too. Sometimes we look around at the inconsolable things in the world, and we become apathetic, because there’s just so much, we don’t even know what to do. And, that undermines our service. But, to busyness, specifically, which I think - culturally - the more we grow in the ability to office wherever we are, and to have access to anything and everything all the time, I think we’re more prone to anxious busyness, rather than just apathy, though I think both of them come to bear.

We go about busyness rather than service, I think, because of two main reasons. One, we become busy in our vanity. And, it may be hidden from us. Unless we’re asking the Lord to search us, we just begin operating in this way. We live in a culture where overflowing schedules and frantic pacing communicates significance, right? We say, oh look at that person. Man, they’re so busy. They’re just overwhelmed, they just can’t get it done. And, what’s underneath that a lot of times is just a little bit of, kind of, admiration and awe, right? Man, they just work so hard. And, hard work is biblical. Don’t get me wrong, we should be hard workers, and if we’re going to serve well, it’s going to mean hard work. So, busyness and hard work are not synonyms, right? Busyness is this anxious busyness that does not honor the Lord.

So, when we go by a restaurant and we see a line outside, and we see the waiters and waitresses and chefs running around like chickens with their heads cut off, we go, man, that’s probably a good place to eat. Look at the line, right? When you go by Caroline’s Cafe, and everyone’ sitting outside at noon waiting for that gigantic cinnamon bun or whatever it is … coffee cake? Sorry. Man, I can’t be in Redlands and not know that. Coffee cake! Right? That’s, like, twice the size of my head. Everyone’s waiting for that. We assume, immediately, that’s a place of significance, because there’s activity. But, activity - props to the coffee cake - it doesn’t necessarily mean that what’s happening there is significant.


So, what we do if frantic pacing and overflowing schedules communicate importance, in my vanity, I’m tempted to follow suit, because it communicates, somehow, my significance. Our lives should be full, they should not be full of anxious busyness. They should be full of service. Or, secondly, we go about busyness rather than service because of two reasons. We become busy in our laziness. Eugene Peterson says this …

“By lazily abdicating the essential work of deciding and directing, establishing values and setting goals, other people do it for us; then we find ourselves frantically, at the last minute, trying to satisfy a half dozen different demands on our time, none of which is essential to our vocation, to stave off the disaster of disappointing someone”

—Eugene Peterson


What he’s saying here, is that if we do not have a focus for our service in the midst of inconsolable things, if we are not planned out, if we do not have a goal and then work back from there on how we are going to hem in our service so that we can reach that, he’s saying, if you don’t plan your life, everyone else will plan it for you, and you will end up being an anxiously busy person rather than a servant-hearted person. See, true service is doing the right things for the right reasons, right? It’s this overflow of heart out of what Christ has done for us, out of his healing and resurrection, out of that we serve, and we work.

So, perhaps this morning, you hear that and you think … man, anxiously busy describes me. I would encourage you to dig down on what you’re doing, and why you’re doing it, and maybe ask yourself some questions. What do I desire to do? What do I really desire to do in the midst of life’s inconsolable things? What do I desire to do? What am I good at? What do I have an opportunity to do, and what do I have the character to do? That, I go in the midst of it, and it doesn’t destroy me, it doesn’t wreck me. Think about those things, and then we begin to get some banks for the river that is our life of service and response to what the Lord has done.

So, this word here for serve … it’s the word used for deacon. And, it’s used in the New Testament to describe a broad range of acts and service. It’s one of the marks of the family of God, that we are to be deaconing one another, we are to be serving one another, and this is a telltale sign of the authority of God’s kingdom coming to bear in the life of his people. That, each member serves one another cheerfully and sacrificially.

So, it’s a service that is sourced in, and an overflow of Jesus’ sacrifice for us. So, in that sense, we’re all called to be deacons. There’s the office that’s distinguished in scripture, but there is the reality of us being deacons in the midst of a world full of inconsolable things. It’s a service that’s sourced in and an overflow of Jesus’ sacrifice for us. In Matthew 20:28, Jesus said he came to serve, not to be served. Man, doesn’t that - the Jesus, the one with this authority, the author, he came to serve. He came to deacon us, to serve, not to be served.

There’s something that comes to the surface, the language of verse 26, as we bring this home … And the unclean spirit, convulsing him and crying out with a loud voice, came out of him … If you think about where else you’ve heard that, your mind would immediately go to the cross. Mark 15 describes the moment of the death of Jesus in almost the same words. In 15 verse 37, it says … and Jesus uttered a loud cry, and breathed his last … Literally means, there, breathed his last means his spirit was expelled. The only way Jesus would ever silence the demons and the inconsolable things of life was to be silenced, himself, for us. The way Jesus’ authority is experienced for us, is that Jesus gave up his authority. And, the authority of Christ means that those who are his can resist adding to the broken list of inconsolable things and resist hastily trying to do what only Jesus can, and instead join God in his work of healing and resurrection.

That’s the invitation for us, from this text this morning. Will we join God in this service, this deaconing of one another, overflowing to Redlands and the surrounding communities? That’s the invitation for us today, and so, we respond at Emmaus every week by coming to the table, to this very physical reality that the Lord has given us in his wisdom and his grace and his goodness, so that we can taste and touch and smell and experience this reality of the kingdom that comes to bear in the midst of matter, in the midst of this physical world.

And so, we come and as we receive it together, we experience grace. God meets us in this meal, and we once again - I would challenge us this morning - let’s come to the table, as we come once again, let’s coming saying, we gladly and willfully submit ourselves to your authority, that brings healing and resurrection. Let’s pray …

Jesus,

We are thankful for the body and blood of Christ. Lord, you came to serve. That is a mind boggling thing, that the one who created all would humble himself and take on flesh, come in the midst of this physical reality to bring healing and resurrection. Lord, to weave redemption throughout our work, God, what a beautiful thing that is. I prayed this morning for all of us who may be in the midst of anxious busyness rather than true service, centered upon you. Lord, would you remind us that there are things in this life that we cannot fix, that we cannot soothe. But, Lord, there is nothing like that in this world that you cannot fix, or you cannot sooth. Lord, I pray this morning we would once again come to you, and willfully and gladly submit ourselves to your authority, that you might raise us, again, to life so that the world may know that Christ has come, as we serve one another and serve the world around us. We thank you, in Jesus’ name, amen.