redlands

A New Way of Relating

Mark 2:13-3:6

How often have we fallen into religious trihardism? Religious trihardism is the notion that we can earn God’s favor by following a laundry list of religious practices and rituals. The Pharisees of Jesus’ day were notorious for their religious trihardism that created an environment of self-righteousness and legalism which drew lines between the religious elite and everyone else. Jesus came with a new message regarding our place with God which was a direct threat to the established order created by the Pharisees.

Missional Impact

 The Gospel of Mark shows Jesus’ desire to turn outcasts into insiders. Jesus meets a man named Levi who was a tax collector. Tax collectors at this time were highly disliked due to their union with Rome to gain money from their own people which was seen as a disgrace to fellow Jews. But, Jesus calls Levi to be a disciple turning him into an insider and his reaction shows how missional impact is possible when our lives are changed by Jesus.


Gospeled Life + Relational Proximity x Gospel Clarity =Missional Impact

  1. Gospeled Life-A life transformed and changed by Jesus. As we come to Jesus we learn truths about our lives that we did not understand before and become transformed by Christ

  2. Relational Proximity-As we live our changed lives among our family, friends, co-workers, and communities around us we are living in relational proximity

  3. Gospel Clarity-When we use our words to express the change that we have experienced we will have a missional impact

  4. Missional Impact- Our transformational story will create more disciples of Jesus 

Levi answers Jesus’ call to discipleship and his life is immediately changed. Levi goes out into his communities and tells everyone about the transformation he just received. Levi tells other outcasts about the change that Jesus provides so that more outsiders are welcomed as insiders creating more disciples of Christ. 

“If we will live lives that are transformed by Jesus. If we will remain in relational proximity of those who do not know Jesus and will be clear about why our lives are changed we will see God use that to reach more people.”


Acknowledge our Need

The Pharisees come across a meal being shared between unclean people and Jesus who, as a Rabbi, is in danger of becoming ceremonially unclean if he makes contact with other unclean people. When the Pharisees comment on Jesus’ actions his response is that he has come to heal the sick not the healthy. One of the major hurdles we have when it comes to being transformed by Jesus is recognizing our need for his grace. We must come to terms with the fact that all of us need the redeeming power of Christ in order to become a transformed people welcomed into the fold. Jesus doesn’t come for the self-righteous because they don’t have a need. But, Jesus came for those who recognize their separation from God due to their sins and to amend the gap created by sinfulness so that all have access to God.  


“The gospel continues to save us as we continue to acknowledge our need for grace.”


Human Need over Ceremonial Law

Jesus claims that the Kingdom of God is completely new. The old religious structure that has been set up will not hold the Kingdom of God. The way to God that Jesus is creating is not through religious practices but through joyful faith and association with Jesus. We do not get to eternity through going to church, conducting a Bible Study, or the giving of your resources. The only way we are brought back to God is through faith in the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. 


The Pharisees get to a point where they are simply waiting for Jesus to make a mistake so that they can call attention to his failings. While worshiping in the synagogue, Jesus calls over a man with a withered hand. Rather than waiting for the Pharisees to accuse him, Jesus asked the Pharisees whether or not it is lawful to do good or harm on the sabbath. The Pharisees are stunned  because they have emphasized lawful requirement to the point that the lines for meeting human need over ceremonial law have become completely blurred. Religious trihardism created people that did not honor a holy God, but obstinate people who thought they could behave their way into the good graces of God. Jesus heals the man with a withered hand because he has created an entirely new way of relating to God.


“Jesus sets forth a basic principle: human need should take precedence over ceremonial and religious laws.” 


Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript


A Deeper Healing

Mark 2:1-12

Jesus drives us deeper than our perceived need

The gospel of Mark tells a well known story of a paralytic man who wanted to see Jesus; but because the crowd surrounding Jesus was so compact the only way to get to him was for his friends to lower him down through the roof of the building that Jesus was in. In a time where the inability to be independent was a massive burden, the paralytic man was hoping to be healed by the only being who could do such a miraculous work. However, we notice that Jesus does not heal the physical ailments of the man immediately, but his first words are “Son, your sins are forgiven.” This is because the man needs a deeper healing than just his physical maladies. It is a completely understandable desire for this man to want to be able to move his body as it should and it is not a bad desire. But Jesus sees that it doesn’t go deep enough because it doesn’t heal the heart. Jesus will not give us our strongest desire until he is our strongest desire. If our strongest desire is anything beyond Jesus, we will be devastated when it fails.

“Whatever your need is it is meant to drive you to Jesus who will take you deeper.” 


Jesus meets us in our need with His aggressive grace

As our need drives us to Jesus, he meets us in the midst of our struggle with his aggressive grace. It is rather strange that Jesus offers forgiveness to the paralytic man even though it seems he came to Jesus for other reasons besides repentance. However, Jesus saw the paralytic man’s faith through his eager desire to get to Jesus even within his powerlessness. This man’s actions mimic our own lives in that we come powerless towards Christ and cast ourselves on his mercy. It is not an attempt to buy God’s favor because grace is not earned. Faith is not earning Christ’s grace, but is trusting in his ability to deeply heal us holistically. When Jesus sees the glimpse of faith in the paralytic man and the actions of his friends, he responds with disproportionate grace. We may not always know how to put words to the weight of our afflictions, but as we ache towards Christ he meets us with his aggressive grace.

“If [Jesus] were not aggressive with his grace, none of us would have a saving faith because faith is not a virtue it is a gift.” 

Jesus overcomes our need with the ultimate healing

In this passage we see Jesus answering a question about his identity. When Jesus declares the paralytic man’s sins are forgiven the scribes are confused because sin can only be forgiven by the one who is sinned against. God is the only one who can forgive sins because all sin is an offense to Him. The scribes become perplexed at Jesus of Nazareth who claims to have the power to forgive this man’s sins which would only be possible if he were God. The scribes cannot verify that man’s sins are forgiven, but to show that Jesus has the authority to forgive sins he commands the paralyzed man to get up, pick up his mat, and to walk home. Jesus verifies his ability to forgive sins by expressing his authority in something that seems impossible. 

The truth is that sin and brokenness are inextricably linked together. We have all sinned and have been sinned against which always brings brokenness to our lives. The good news of the gospel is all of that is healed in Jesus Christ. The deep need we have for our sins to be forgiven, our brokenness healed and the deepest desires of our hearts to be fulfilled is all healed because Jesus is healing all. 

“Sin needs forgiving and brokenness needs healing and Jesus does both. 

This is the deeper healing.”

Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript


Kingdom Authority

Mark 1:21-34

An Undeniable Authority

The Gospel of Mark unpacks the difference in Jesus’ authority from other Jewish leaders when he visits the synagogue. The Jewish community would gather at the synagogue to be taught by scribes who would often quote well known rabbis in order to give their teaching authority. However, Jesus was different from these teachers of the Torah. Jesus did not speak authoritatively in the academic sense, but spoke in a manner that gave him rule, dominion and power. Immediately Jesus demonstrates this power by rebuking the demon out of a man. Jesus showed his authority in his teaching by demonstrating his power over unclean spirits.

Jesus is the author of all creation which means that there is an in depth knowledge and authority that can only be shown by the one whom all creation is subject to. Those witnessing Jesus’ power could not articulate it, but they were experiencing the authority of the author of all creation.

A Healing Authority

The undeniable authority that Jesus has leads to a healing authority. Jesus’ authority expresses itself in mending, renewing, and healing. As the kingdom fleshes itself out in our lives the brokenness we experience becomes renewed under the authority of Christ. This healing is both spiritual and physical because God’s good creation is not just spiritual but is physical as well. We must remember that what we do in day to day life of the physical realm is important. Jesus came to redeem all things and as we join with him in his work to renew creation what we do with our lives matters.

Jesus’ power and healing authority is the same today as it was in the synagogue all those years ago. In the midst of the inconsolable things of life, Jesus has healing power over our lives. Even though everything won’t be fixed here and now we have hope that Jesus will one day renew all things.

How is Jesus’ Authority Demonstrated?

  1. There is a time coming when all sin will be done away with, and brokenness in every form will be healed.

  2. We should join Jesus in asking God for healing

  3. Recognizing that the broken aspects of our lives are not defeats

“Inconsolable things’ are the sins and miseries that will not be eradicated until heaven comes home, the things that only Jesus, and no one of us, can overcome. We cannot expect to change what Jesus has left unfixed for the moment. The presence of inconsolable things does not mean the absence of Jesus’ power, however. Rather, it establishes the context for it. There in the midst of what is inconsolable to us, the true unique nature and quality of Jesus’s power shows itself to be unlike any other power we have seen.”

—Zack Eswine

A Resurrecting Authority

Jesus’ authority does not subjugate as the kingdoms of this world do. It does not destroy as kings of this world tend to do. Jesus’ authority resurrects, revives, and brings life. When we are healed by Jesus’ resurrection power it leads us to serve the kingdom that has true healing authority. Our lives become marked by hospitality and generosity as we begin building life giving communities right where we are. When Jesus’ authority comes to bear in our lives it gives us a new sense of priorities that reverses the need for dominating others. We do not do this in order to pay anything back but experiencing the healing authority of the kingdom blooms a desire to spread to others what our Savior has done for us.  

In the midst of this we must be careful that we do not confuse business with service. When we see all the inconsolable things of life it can be easy for us to serve in ways that are not effective. We must be careful that we do not trade true Christ honoring service for anxious business. Now, sometimes this comes into our lives because we see all the inconsolable problems of life which makes us apathetic because there is so much that we do not know what to do.

But there are two other reasons that tend to surface in our business:

1. We become busy in our vanity

2. We become busy in our laziness

“In the midst of the inconsolable things of life we have to distinguish from business and service. Business often masquerades as service...a busy Christian is a blasphemous desire to do God’s work for Him.”

Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript

The Call to Follow

Mark 1:14-20

All of us are prone to think about ourselves first and foremost even in the midst of the good news that others have. This results in living in a Kingdom of self. Mark begins his gospel by warning us against the pitfalls of the false Kingdom of self and announces the triumphant kingdom that Jesus brings to us.

Kingdom Contrast

Mark places the kingdom of this world and the Kingdom of God side by side in order to contrast their major differences. Mark wants us to see that the kingdom of this world is a broken Kingdom of self. When we live in the Kingdom of self we tend to treat everyone and everything around us as being geared towards serving us.

Mark wants to point us to a truer and better kingdom. A kingdom of life where the true king is enthroned. God’s people have been longing for a king to set them free from the bonds of the world. Jesus arrives and says that the opportune time has come for the Kingdom of God. The Kingdom of God is the active exercise of God’s righteous power and authority with the rightful king enthroned. Jesus says that there is a new king in power that will usher in the healing of the world and a new way of life.

Even though a new king has been announced we still struggle to keep Jesus on the throne of our lives rather than ourselves. The reason we think about ourselves first is because we are born into a reality of sin. The problem is that there are few things that make us more functionally miserable than being self absorbed. It constantly makes us think of ourselves above everyone else which is a horrible experience. Very few people are capable of treating us or seeing us the way in which we want to be seen or treated. All of this is the outcome of living within the confines of a worldly kingdom.

“The Kingdom of self is heavily defended territory...Most sin, far from being a mere lapse of morals or a weak will, is an energetically and expensively erected defense against God.”

-Eugene Peterson

Kingdom Entrance

Jesus says that the Kingdom of God is at hand. In other words this new kingdom is within reach. We are not there yet, but we can see glimpses of its arrival in our lives.

How do we enter into this kingdom that is within reach, yet is not fully recognized?

1) Repent

Repent means more than simply changing one's mind. It means to rethink everything and look at the world through God’s rule. Repenting includes the act of turning away from wasting our time, money, and talents on the Kingdom of self where we try to surpass other people in the rat race of materialism.

2) Believe the Gospel

Believing in the gospel requires trusting the announcement of joyful news. When we trust the good news we turn from our agendas and enter into the kingdom that Jesus brings. We are all leaning on something that we think matters most in this life. If we lean on anything other than Jesus it is another form of enthroning ourselves. Believing is acting on what we know to be true.

“Repent: give up your agenda and trust me for mine.”

Kingdom Life

The call that Jesus gives us to respond through repentance and trust is an ongoing act rather than a one time event. It is the way that we continue in the life of the Kingdom of God. It is something that should be happening in our daily lives. Following Jesus means that knowing him becomes our supreme passion. Jesus is saying that we must die to the Kingdom of self and enter into the Kingdom of God. Jesus calls us to follow him so fully that all other attachments pale in comparison to our pursuit of him.

“Our call is to bring glimpses and tastes of God’s brand new world that is coming here and now...what people need to experience is an outpost of the Kingdom of God in the midst of a world that operates in the Kingdom of self”

Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript


Gospel Community

Ephesians 2:11-22

Are you prepared to do what’s necessary within God’s definition of success?

In Ephesians, Paul describes that the gauge by which we should be measuring ourselves is whether or not we are good at remembering what God has done for us. We must remember that we were once separated from Christ, but we are no longer strangers or without hope. The mature Christian is someone who is able to quickly and deeply remember who we were and where we are going. It does not do us any good if we are only good at doing “church” once a week if we do not know how to build community outside those walls.

I. Remember that we’re designed for community

Paul uses the conflict between the Jews and the Gentiles to illustrate what it means to be part of a gospel community. The intense animosity between these two groups during Paul’s time spans across generations. But, Paul uses this conflict to express what happens when gospel community enters into the hearts of people. Communities are reoriented from a diverse people because when we experience Christ, radical grace becomes the foundational event in our lives. Our history, heritage, language, or race are no longer what identifies us. When we meet someone who has also been affected by Christ’s radical grace we have immediate commonality with them. We were designed to be united within a community marked by the grace that comes through Jesus Christ.

“We are united but different. We defer to one another but there is no hierarchy. We love without fear of being rejected. We serve people’s needs without being motivated to make sure our needs are met.”

II. Remember that there are distortions to community

We can easily bring our own assumptions into our communities which can create distortions because it misses God’s fullest intention for his people. Thus, we need to be aware of common inaccuracies that rob us of true community.

1. Community is Just Connection

When we make community only about connection it becomes a social networking platform based on convenience. If our goal is simply about connection, then it all falls apart when difficulties arise. There must be something that connects us more than what we have in common other than Christ.

2. Community as Counseling

Although community should be a place where we can be vulnerable, honest, and attempting to help one another through life’s struggles, it becomes a problem when we focus so much on these aspects that we only discuss our problems and forget to implement who Christ is in our lives.

3. Community is Just a Bible Study

Of course, we should be eager to learn more about Scripture. However, when a community becomes focused on transferring information rather than being transformed it becomes an issue.

4. Community Becomes a Clique

Cliques can occur when we have developed deep and intimate relationships with the people around us. We may not recognize it at first but this can lead to communities who turn their backs on newcomers because they lack the ability to immediately push people into the same level of camaraderie. We fail to allow newcomers in because we are more comfortable with those we are familiar with. If we alienate others in our communities then we are out of step with gospel community.

It is important to recognize that we cannot have gospel community without the first three aspects. We need connection, scripture study, and to work through sin. The problem comes when we substitute one or more of these aspects with the true unity that comes from access to God.  

“Without Christ we would not know our brother nor could we come to know him because the way is blocked by our own ego”

-Dietrich Bonhoeffer

III. Remember that we are redeemed to a new community

Before Christ came to reconcile all people to God, there was a time in which Gentiles could be killed if they tried to cross the threshold into the Jewish Temple where God’s presence rested. But Christ has brought peace between these two factions by tearing down the dividing wall and inviting all into a new community. Sin separates us from God and others which means we need access that only comes through Christ so that we can be part of the new community that he brings.

“It is not enough to be brought near to God, we need to be brought in.”


Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript


Guarded in Christ

Philippians 4:2-9

Throughout the Philippian epistle, Paul is reminding the church that they are living in the reality that Jesus Christ is transforming all things in order to make them new. Paul encourages us to keep our eyes focused on the reality that we are citizens of Heaven, however, the one thing that will take our eyes off that reality is the conflict of how we live out the reality of Christ’s reign. Rather than being united under the saving grace of Christ we are often divided over how to live out Jesus’ reign. Paul says that Satan loves to use that diversion of our focus to steal our hope, and to completely zap us of all our passion for the gospel. We become filled with seething anger at one another causing anxiety for all involved rather than a church united under one hope.

In the midst of this dilemma, how do we guard against fighting over the how’s of following Jesus?

Why “the how” takes over “the what”

Throughout history the church has had problems with strong leaders who begin to quibble and fight over how they should lead their congregation in following Christ. When this happens it is often the congregation that suffers the consequences of such debates. It would be understandable if these issues occurred in churches that did not have a strong theology, but the problem is we can often find this kind of bickering in churches that are strong theologically and have high biblical convictions. These argumentative obstacles occur when convictions of seeking God’s way shifts into seeking our own way.  We can become obsessed with our method of worship, our way of doing ministry, our way of preaching, our methods of following Christ become the only method to follow Christ. It is within this atmosphere that we can begin to look down on other groups with a sense of spiritual superiority. If other churches do not follow Christ our way then we can immediately separate ourselves from them. The method we use, or how, we worship becomes far more important than who we worship.   

In a healthy church, strong convictions breed healthy disciples. In discipleship we begin to mimic the person that we are following which means we become more like Christ. But, if we become obsessed with our methodology rather than the one we worship, strong convictions act as a poison in the church which slowly spreads from the leadership to the congregation. Paul knows that Philippi has strong convictions for the gospel, but somewhere along the way two leaders are becoming obsessed with their own way which is threatening to tear the church apart. We must be sure that we are not becoming calloused to what Jesus has done, in favor of burning with a passion for the opinions of what we should be doing.  

“When elephants fight, it is the grass that suffers.”

It is important to recognize that it is not wrong to be passionate about how we follow Jesus. However, it becomes a problem when our love for Jesus becomes overshadowed by our way of following him. It is also crucial to realize that this is not something only leaders of the church should be watching out for. We are all called to be ambassadors for Christ which means it is a heart issue that we must all watch out for because we are all called to lead and serve the church forward with the gifts that God has given us. Methodology is vastly important because it should unite us as we live our lives as disciples of Christ, but it becomes an issue when it becomes the focus.   

“If we leave Jesus behind, what is the point of being the church?”

Paul’s Habits to keep us focused on “the what”

If we want to be a people who know Christ, then we must be a people with habits that saturate our hearts in what Christ has accomplished on our behalf.

Habit 1: Thanksgiving before the Father

The first habit that Paul encourages us to practice is to rejoice in every aspect of our lives. This can be incredibly difficult for us to grasp because our lives are complex. There is a plethora of events which we could say do not evoke a spirit of rejoicing. Yet, Paul encourages us to rejoice in all things because of what Christ has done. Regardless of what happens in our lives, either positive or negative, we can rest assured that we are reconciled to our loving Heavenly Father thanks to what Jesus has done for us. We can draw near to God and He draws near to us. If we make it a habit of pushing away from God, then our lives will be full of anxiety, fear, and worry. Then we will expect other people to fill the void only God can fill which leads to fighting over the best method of overcoming our obstacles.

Habit 2: Hospitality towards others

Paul says that we must literally practice the “what” of Jesus’ kingdom because every day we are going through the motions of what the world says is true, just, pure, and noble. We must strengthen our muscles of discipleship towards Christ and what it looks like to be part of his kingdom by forming habits that mimic those truths. Paul is saying that in order to be a people who properly sees what Jesus has done, we need practices that captures the picture of the truth of Jesus. Hospitality is a habit that keeps our focus in check.

Hospitality is simply welcoming others as Christ has welcomed us. It creates a grace filled space where a friend or stranger can enter and experience the welcoming spirit of Christ. It is a way to express love for others in the way that Jesus loved us even when we were sinners. It challenges our assumptions of other people and pushes away our biases towards others by reminding us of the welcoming grace that we have received in Jesus. As we sacrificially welcome others into our lives our hearts begin to open to the understanding that we all are welcomed into the adopted family of God which keeps us focused on the what so that the how’s can take care of themselves.

Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcription-Lent Guide


The Importance of Confession

As Paul approaches the end of his letter to the church in Philipi, he implores his readers to remember that they are a work in progress. As human beings we can become tied up in the human tension which consists of a desire for perfection while being fully aware that we are not close to this goal. Paul reminds us that even though he is an apostle he has not attained this perfection. It is important for us to understand the tension of who we long to be and who we really are in order to avoid a life of hypocrisy.

Human Tension

Humans live in the tension of having a genuine desire to live for God, but struggle in the process. We want to live lives that mimic love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, gentleness, faithfulness and self-control. Yet, even though we may sincerely desire these things, we find that it is incredibly difficult to do so consistently. We somehow fall short of living the lives we wish we could. As we grow in our awareness of our flesh and sinfulness our dependency on the cross enlarges.

Many Christians are unthinkably horrified when a real sinner is suddenly discovered among the righteous. So we remain alone with our sin, living in lies and hypocrisy... He who is alone with his sins is utterly alone.”

-Dietrich Bonhoeffer

Within this tension the gospel gives us hope to press on. Paul declares that there is no height nor depth that the cross cannot go, in order to bridge the gap between us and God’s holiness. By God’s grace Christ makes us his own; we belong to him. The question is: how do we live in the knowledge that we belong to Christ despite the human tension that we find ourselves in?

We sense that we should want to know God and live accordingly.

And yet, while I feel I want it, I fail to obtain it.

The Mistaken Ways of Resolving the Tension

Rather than resolving the tension of our sin and the process of God’s transformative grace we try to move forward quickly. We can easily become dishonest with the fact that our transformation is ongoing and pretend to be further along in the process than we are. The ideal of perfection becomes tantalizing to the point that we would rather pretend to be perfect than be honest about our shortcomings.  

  1. Pretending

    We tend to hide our sin from God or others by pretending that everything we do is acceptable. We can create habits of avoiding those who would keep us accountable for our actions which naturally turns into a form of isolation. We begin pretending to be someone we are not in order to hide our shortcomings. Hopelessness erupts in our lives when we believe that life in Christ is only available to the spiritual elite.

  2. Performing

    In order to cover our failures, we bury our sin in busyness to impress God and/or other people. We put on our best moral performance to meet everyone’s expectations of us in hopes that the tension we desperately hope to avoid will disappear. The outcome of such a performance is hypocrisy rather than peace. We become trapped in the cycle of seeing the sham of our performance which leads to the sense of belonging to our sin, rather than Christ, which returns us to our habit of performing.

If you tell the truth you don’t have to remember anything.

-Mark Twain

Pretending and performing only furthers the dichotomy between the people we pretend to be and our true selves. It binds us into a false assumption that we belong to our sins rather than exist under the banner of God’s grace through the cross of Christ.

Confession: The Gospel Key to Resolving the Tension

Paul discourages us from using the old system of law or titles in order to pretend that we are living in perfection. Instead, Paul encourages us to use any means necessary in order to grow in the reality of grace even if that means revealing our shortcomings. As we mature, we will grow in our understanding of how holy God is which, in turn, reveals the depths of our sin while simultaneously revealing how good God’s grace is in light of the cross. Being a mature Christian is not about perfection, but the realization that there is always room to grow.

The gospel is this: We are more sinful and flawed in ourselves than we ever dared believe, yet at the very same time we are more loved and accepted in Jesus Christ than we ever dared hope.”

-Timothy Keller

The key for pressing forward to Christ is the discipline of confession.

The two types of confession

  1. We must come to terms with the fact that we are unable to free or protect ourselves from our shortcomings.

  2. Recognize that Christ has made us his own

    Confession is simply admitting these two truths before God which provides us with the hope to move forward. Confession is the act of examining our lives so that we can bring our shortcomings before God and humbly receive the truth that the only way to freedom is moving towards Christ. We also confess our knowledge that Christ has made us his own despite our failures which means we do not have to pretend that we are spiritually pure. We confess that we have sinned and that we belong to Jesus Christ.  

Not that I have already obtained this or am already perfect, but I press on to make it my own, because Christ Jesus has made me his own.

Philippians 3:11

Do we live as though we belong to Christ or do we live as though we belong to our failures and shortcomings?

Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript-Lent Guide



Fulfillment in Christ Alone

WHAT WE WERE CREATED FOR

Humans are fundamentally searching creatures. We are constantly seeking validation and fulfillment outside of ourselves to satisfy a longing deep within each one of us. Even children are searching for connection through experiences of tasting sweets or watching movies that they have seen a multitude of times. As we grow, we continue to seek out what gives us purpose, value, and inner joy. If left to their own devices, humans naturally begin to stuff their lives full of things that break, get lost, or get old and rusty in the hopes that something will satisfy the longing of their hearts. The heart is so complex, deep, and intricate that its desire to be known cannot be satisfied through imperfect desires or people.  Unless we find our place in Christ all other longings will leave us wanting more.

“Because you made us for yourself, and our hearts are restless

 til they find thy rest in thee.”

 -Augustine

Jesus points us towards what we were truly created for when he says: “The kingdom of heaven is like treasure hidden in a field, which a man found and covered up. Then, in his joy, he goes and sells all that he has and buys the field” (Matthew 13:44). We must realize that the good things that leave us momentarily satisfied are simply glimpses of the reality which our hearts truly long for. The reality that only exists in the Kingdom of God. When we find the reality of the kingdom, and kingship that we are searching for, we will sell all we have in order to gain it. However, we must be wary that we do not settle for achievements of the flesh which fails to accomplish true confidence.

THE WRONG KIND OF CONFIDENCE

  1. Putting our trust in religious behavior rather than the work of Christ

  2. Attaining salvation through our own desires or giftings

  3. Becoming watch dogs of heresy rather than shepherds of truth

Paul urges the church in Philippi to be cautious about putting their confidence in anything other than the saving grace of Christ. It is too easy to place one’s confidence in deeds, works, titles, or relationships. But Paul emphatically denies the notion that any of these can offer fulfillment for oneself or favor with God. We have no confidence in the work of the flesh. It’s not through circumcision and law keeping that brings about salvation, but it is the circumcision of the heart through Jesus Christ who came to fulfill the law. The mark of a new believer is not physical circumcision, but the spirit of God, at work in us.

THE RIGHT KIND OF LOSS

It is important to note that it is not ambition or the celebration of hard work that is wrong. However, we must never lose sight of that fact that compared to Christ all is rubbish. Nothing can come close to the importance of one’s identity solidly planted in the restorative nature of God himself. Paul is not saying that all human achievement is worthless, but he is saying that compared to Christ, and without Christ, it is worthless.

“Indeed, I count everything as loss, because of the surpassing worth of knowing Christ Jesus, my Lord. For his sake, I’ve suffered the loss of all things, and count them as rubbish, in order that I might gain Christ.”

 Philippians 3:8 

HOW DO WE LIVE OUR LIVES IN THE RIGHT KIND OF LOSS?

  1. Recognizing that everything that comes our way is an opportunity to gain more of Christ

    Everything that comes our way in life is our opportunity to move towards Christ. In everything that is pleasant, we give thanks to Jesus. In everything that is difficult, we lean on him for strength. We constantly live in the tension between thanks and dependency on Christ. This is counting all things as loss.

  2. Hold things gently

    As we interact with the things of this world, we will consistently demonstrate that the achievements of the flesh are not our ultimate treasure. Everything we achieve in this life will be given its value based on the value we have in Christ. This means that we will hold everything loosely because compared to Christ it is not something worth holding on too tightly. Those who hold the spoils of this life loosely will find that generosity is a natural outpouring. When we refuse to hold tightly to the temporal nature of things that rust and corrupt, we become generous.

  3. Trust that we will not lose our joy

    Experiencing loss in this world is an unfortunate side effect of the fall that we all must face. We will experience it. But, even in the loss of all things we will not grumble because our joy is Christ. This is the kind of loss that leads to life and what we were created for.

“But we do not want you to be uninformed, brothers about those who are asleep, that you may not grieve as others who do not have hope.”

1 Thessalonians 4:13

THE BEST KIND OF KNOWING

In order for us to move past the wrong kind of confidence and push forward into the right kind of loss we must have a personal knowledge of Christ. This is not simply a knowledge of the historicity of Jesus; rather, this is the kind of knowing that makes us say that Jesus is our lord and our savior. The kind of knowing that becomes a fountainhead from which the rest of the aspects flow.

KNOWING CHRIST

  1. Biblically

    Christians are Bible people; thus we know the grand story of redemption and the reality of Christ through scripture. It is not simply a book that we read but it is the very essence of our lives. We are tethered to scripture because it is how we come to know who we are in Christ.

  2. Theologically

    We come to know Christ through the theological truths of the Christian faith which include: salvation, the trinity, humanity, and even scripture. It covers the basic theological truths because without these truths we cannot truly know Christ.

  3. Personally

    If all we have is knowing Jesus theologically and doctrinally, we reduce knowing Christ to the legalistic snare of avoiding error. Personally knowing Christ is more than orthodoxy and articulating the correct theology or doctrine. Knowing Christ personally means we commune with him as we learn from him. The love we have for him begins to grow and mature as we think of him and talk with him. We find that in Christ we are home. The longings that exist deep inside of us find rest and fulfillment in Christ alone.

“We can’t have confidence in the flesh and gain right standing before God. We have right standing before God, because he has found us.”

DOES CHRIST LOOK SO GOOD TO US THAT EVERYTHING ELSE, BY COMPARISON, SEEMS EXPENDABLE?

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