Sermons

The Essence of Faith

Mark 5:21-43

What does it look like to live a life of faith? 

Desperate for Jesus (How we come to Him)

Mark describes a story in which Jairus, a leader of the Synagogue, came to Jesus desperate for someone to help his dying daughter. Jairus came to Jesus knowing full well that Jesus already had the reputation of being a trouble-maker in Synagogues as a threat to the status quo. But, Jairus sets aside his position, reputation, and personal safety by falling at the feet of Jesus fraught with fear over the life of his daughter.

As Jesus and Jairus make their way to the sick child, Jesus stops in the middle of the crowd after he feels power come out of him. As it turns out, a woman who had been suffering from severe bleeding for years with no hope of being cured pushed through the crowd and touched Jesus’ cloak healing her instantly. 

These two stories are crucial in understanding God’s grace because the bleeding woman is the antithesis of Jairus. Jairus has wealth, status, and he was an authority in the synagogue. The woman was a social outcast due to her status as “unclean” from the bleeding, she spent all her money on physicians to no avail, and she was cut off from worship in the synagogue. Yet both are unified in their desperation for Jesus to help them in their life altering predicaments. 

“It’s not just sin and suffering that drive us to Christ. It is meant that even in the good times that we should be driven to Christ.”


Delayed by Jesus (How we grow to trust Him)

As we come to Jesus we may come to realize that his timeline is different than ours. First, the woman had been suffering from her illness for twelve years. Second, while Jesus is on the way to heal the dying girl he stops to talk to this woman, which seems to be a far less urgent matter than the task he was already on. The point in these two scenarios is that the timing of Jesus is not bound by our own intuition or urgency. Jesus chooses to give attention to this woman who has been pronounced unclean or unwelcome in the synagogue because his grace is not confined to status or wealth. 

In order for trust in Christ to grow we must understand that the opposite of faith is not doubt, but it is control. Since Jesus is bringing about our good within the delay he will not be controlled by what we think he should do. Faith requires us to relinquish the control we so desperately desire to have in order to place our trust in God’s ability to determine the best course of action. 

“Delayed, for your situation, does not mean denied. It may not be coming as quickly as you would expect, but because of who Jesus is, we can trust that there is something at play in the situation that God knows and we don’t.”

Dependent Upon Jesus (How we remain in Him)

The good news that is revealed from both of these encounters is that Jesus’ grace and love are compatible with delays. The bleeding woman had hoped to be healed incognito, but once she touched Jesus’ cloak he delays the healing of the young girl in order to bring deeper healing to this woman. Jesus requires more from her than she expected when he calls her out, but he responds to her with love and endearment bringing about a restoration that she was not expecting. 

Likewise Jesus requires more of Jairus than he was expecting. Jairus simply wanted Jesus to cure the fever coming over his daughter. When the news comes to both of them that his child had died Jesus asks that Jairus would simply trust in him. The outcome of such faith is that rather than a cure for his daughter Jairus witnesses a resurrection.

These stories reveal three aspects of Jesus’ character which makes him dependable:

  1. His grace is for you: Jesus forces Jairus to wait in order to give full attention to a woman who had zero status and power in the culture of his day because his grace is for both of them. Jesus’ grace is for us regardless of who we are or what we’ve done.

  2. His power is for you: We see Jesus’ power conquers our greatest enemy: death. Jesus grabs the young girl by the hand and raises her from death and he will do the same for you. The cross is a reminder that Jesus has power over death and he will gently pull us up from the curse of death.

  3. He became weak for you: In Jesus’ humanity we see a weakness after power comes out from him which was used to heal the bleeding woman. This is foreshadowing the weakness Jesus takes upon himself on the cross in order that we may live in God’s power. 

“The delays of God mean that we will sacrifice more than we thought and we will gain more than we hoped.”

Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript


The Power and Goodness of Christ

Mark 4:35-5:20

The apocalyptic literature of Daniel sets up the valuable truth that Jesus is both abundantly powerful and abundantly good. Daniel Chapter 7 dives into a vision of four beasts that erupt from the sea. Each beast is meant to represent the human powers of Babylon, Persia, Greece, and Rome. In the time that Mark’s Gospel was written the audience consisted of Roman citizens who were facing persecution and death from Caesar Nero. Mark wants his audience to connect the power and goodness of Jesus in the midst of the powerful evil they find themselves in.

A Great Power

Throughout the scriptures we see that water is often viewed as chaotic darkness. When the Jewish people thought of the sea they thought of the clash between order and chaos or the place where God and evil rage against each other. Mark tells us the story of when the disciples were on a boat in the midst of an intense storm. When they look to Jesus for help they are surprised to find him sleeping. In pure terror the disciples wake Jesus up and he immediately rebukes the wind and the storm immediately ceases. The power of Jesus takes the intensity of a storm and commands it into a deep calm. The disciples were astonished at the display of Jesus’ power because they know from the scriptures that only the power of God can control the sea. In this story, Jesus does not conjure a higher power to deal with the storm, but he speaks directly to the wind because there is no higher power than the power Jesus has.


“[Jesus is] the creator of all things with unmatched and unmanageable power and the chaos of the sea is at [his] command.” 

A Great Compassion

When it comes to storms in our lives we can often become reductionistic in our views to the problems at hand. We may think that we simply need to move somewhere else or change a minor detail in our physical, mental, or spiritual lives rather than work on the depths of our problems. But, scriptures gives weight to our physical, mental, moral and spiritual selves and understands that they interlock which means they affect one another. Too often we reduce our world to the physical reality that we can see, touch, poke, or prod. But, there is a deep reality that is missed when we only focus on the physical. After Jesus calmed the storm the disciples ran into a demon possessed man who is so powerful that he is unable to be chained or controlled by anyone. The demon possessed man mimics the reality of what we run to for comfort in the midst of negative circumstances such as: isolation, bondage to addiction, or harming ourselves which doesn’t always mean physical harm. But the goodness of Jesus is demonstrated because he goes to the furthest depths for this man so that we can have the hope that Jesus will come rescue us from the depths of our chaos. 


In the midst of the powerful legion within this man Jesus shows his power by forcing the unclean spirits into the pigs who then drowned in the sea. The connection here is that Daniel sees a vision of a power that will engulf the world, but we see Jesus coming in the midst of this legion and he brings redemption, healing, and restoration. We see Christ’s power over what seems to be the most unimaginable power in the world. The demon possessed man is completely restored due to the deep healing of Jesus.  


“If we reject personal spiritual evil we will be blind to a significant power at work that stirs up our struggle and sin and creates chaos.” 



A Great Fear

Throughout each of these narratives there is an intense fear woven throughout. Fear of the storm, Jesus’ power, and the fear of the demoniac. Fear rises when we find ourselves in the midst of a power that we cannot control. The differences between the power of the storm, the demoniac, and Jesus is that Jesus is the only one that loves us. Just like the other powers we are unable to control the power of Jesus, but we can rest easy knowing that he is good. If the disciples had known Christ’s love and unlimited power they would have been able to remain calm within the storm. We often think that if Jesus loves us that he would not let us go through the storms of our lives, but this is not a Biblical view of Jesus’ love. Rather we should focus on the authority, power, and care of Jesus in the midst of the difficulties that arise in our lives. 


“If we believe he is powerful but not good we are driven away from him. If we believe he is good but not powerful we are driven to pity him. But, if we believe he is good and powerful we are driven to trust him in any and every season of life.”




Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript


Slaves Set Free

Mark 3:7-35

Jesus did not come to simply fix the sin or moral problems of the individual. Jesus is Israel’s long awaited Messiah; God’s anointed one. Jesus came to liberate everyone from captivity of the dark powers within this world. Jesus came to set us free from the wickedness and power plays of the kingdoms that seek to bring us down with their hellbent agendas. It is difficult in our modern views to think about the ideas of slavery or the power that modern kingdoms seek to control, but Jesus’ gospel of liberation, freedom, reconciliation, and redemption are just as potent against powerhouses who falsely seek authority as it was in his day. 

“Jesus did not come to merely dismiss our minor imperfections or show us a more moral or better way of life. He came to liberate us from spiritual slavery.”

Just like Israel, we can all become enslaved to our own desires which acts out as rebellion against God. The tragedy in Israel’s story is that even when they were God’s covenant family they polluted their own land by choosing to rebel, insult, and fight against God’s Holy Spirit who was in their midst. Israel defaced their temples by putting up idols as physical  representations of the dark powers which ruled the pagan nations around them. Isaiah prophesied a new exodus would be lead directly by God’s spirit present in the Messiah. This Messiah would forgive the sins of the people thus freeing them from demonic bondage.  

“The people of Israel had become enslaved to their own passions; their own depravities. Enslaved to the wicked and hostile world around them.”

It is crucial to remember that Jesus does not call sinners and tax collectors to show them that there isn’t anything wrong with their actions nor to condone the fact that the pharisees were engaging with pagan slave masters. The point is that Jesus calls the worst and most vile enemies of God because if God’s restorative grace is not for them it is not for anyone. 

“This Messiah would forgive the sins of the people setting them free from demonic bondage.”

The scene is set with a confrontation of cosmic proportions when the Scribes accuse Jesus of having power from Beelzebul rather than the Holy Spirit. But, Jesus declares his authority comes from the God who promised to rescue his people and cast down all other rivals to His kingdom. Jesus’ exorcisms throughout his ministry are not just morality plays about individual deliverance, but they are the evidence of the cosmic upheaval of the pagan powers surrounding God’s people. The dark kingdoms of this world are being overthrown and their tyrants are being cast down and plundered. Jesus’ liberation from the self inflicted wounds of idolatry and spiritual adultery is unfolding before the watching crowds. Jesus declares that the kingdom which sets the enslaved free is available for those who would believe the gospel.

“The beginning of the new exodus is exactly what the good news, the gospel, is all about. God’s Holy Spirit returning once again to dwell with His people...this Spirit would be present in the Messiah and he would do all of this by the power of God.”

Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript

A Deeper Healing

Mark 2:1-12

Jesus drives us deeper than our perceived need

The gospel of Mark tells a well known story of a paralytic man who wanted to see Jesus; but because the crowd surrounding Jesus was so compact the only way to get to him was for his friends to lower him down through the roof of the building that Jesus was in. In a time where the inability to be independent was a massive burden, the paralytic man was hoping to be healed by the only being who could do such a miraculous work. However, we notice that Jesus does not heal the physical ailments of the man immediately, but his first words are “Son, your sins are forgiven.” This is because the man needs a deeper healing than just his physical maladies. It is a completely understandable desire for this man to want to be able to move his body as it should and it is not a bad desire. But Jesus sees that it doesn’t go deep enough because it doesn’t heal the heart. Jesus will not give us our strongest desire until he is our strongest desire. If our strongest desire is anything beyond Jesus, we will be devastated when it fails.

“Whatever your need is it is meant to drive you to Jesus who will take you deeper.” 


Jesus meets us in our need with His aggressive grace

As our need drives us to Jesus, he meets us in the midst of our struggle with his aggressive grace. It is rather strange that Jesus offers forgiveness to the paralytic man even though it seems he came to Jesus for other reasons besides repentance. However, Jesus saw the paralytic man’s faith through his eager desire to get to Jesus even within his powerlessness. This man’s actions mimic our own lives in that we come powerless towards Christ and cast ourselves on his mercy. It is not an attempt to buy God’s favor because grace is not earned. Faith is not earning Christ’s grace, but is trusting in his ability to deeply heal us holistically. When Jesus sees the glimpse of faith in the paralytic man and the actions of his friends, he responds with disproportionate grace. We may not always know how to put words to the weight of our afflictions, but as we ache towards Christ he meets us with his aggressive grace.

“If [Jesus] were not aggressive with his grace, none of us would have a saving faith because faith is not a virtue it is a gift.” 

Jesus overcomes our need with the ultimate healing

In this passage we see Jesus answering a question about his identity. When Jesus declares the paralytic man’s sins are forgiven the scribes are confused because sin can only be forgiven by the one who is sinned against. God is the only one who can forgive sins because all sin is an offense to Him. The scribes become perplexed at Jesus of Nazareth who claims to have the power to forgive this man’s sins which would only be possible if he were God. The scribes cannot verify that man’s sins are forgiven, but to show that Jesus has the authority to forgive sins he commands the paralyzed man to get up, pick up his mat, and to walk home. Jesus verifies his ability to forgive sins by expressing his authority in something that seems impossible. 

The truth is that sin and brokenness are inextricably linked together. We have all sinned and have been sinned against which always brings brokenness to our lives. The good news of the gospel is all of that is healed in Jesus Christ. The deep need we have for our sins to be forgiven, our brokenness healed and the deepest desires of our hearts to be fulfilled is all healed because Jesus is healing all. 

“Sin needs forgiving and brokenness needs healing and Jesus does both. 

This is the deeper healing.”

Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript


A New Kind of Day

Mark 1:35-45

It is easy for us to live in such a busy pacing of life that the roots of our hearts and home are weakened with rot. We currently live in a culture that compounds on our already busy schedules with requests to volunteer or serve above and beyond what we already do. The technological age that we live in makes it nearly impossible for us to get away from the business that looms over us. We must learn a new way to go about our day so that our lives produce fruit in our lives rather than business.

Being Before Doing...

When our lives become overwhelming with our business, prayer and solitude are the first aspects that we leave behind which, ironically, are what we need most. The Gospel of Mark shows that the busier Jesus was the more intentional he became about prayer and communion with the Father. Jesus teaches us that our lives depend on communion with the Father. 

Jesus’ prayer life is incredibly intentional and intimate even when crowds of people were vying for his attention. Jesus understood that his priorities were geared towards being with God first and meeting the needs of others second. We cannot meet the needs of others fruitfully if we are not first laying the foundation of intimate relationship with God. 

“The degree that you know the Fatherly love of God is the degree that you do not need power, comfort, control and approval...we live out the freedom we have in Christ through prayer.”

...Produces Word and Deed Living...

Jesus was the first rabbi in history to ever suggest that we should have a fatherly view of God. Jesus’ prayer life reminds us that relationship with God is oriented around who we are and not what we do. Word and deed living is produced from a being before doing perspective. It is not being without doing it’s simply understanding that our being, identified with God, is what produces fruitful doing. Humans have more needs than just the physical reality of what they/we can see. There is a spiritual need that people do not see as readily which must be addressed in order for ultimate healing to come into their lives. When we are feeding our bodies on a spiritual level as well as physical we become a more holistic person which opens the door for word and deed living.  

“Christians must be word and deed people which means we are people who do not despise the world or reflect it because they are utterly different from the world.”

...Which Results in Holistic Healing

As we go about our day as word and deed people we see that we are joining God and his work which results in a comprehensive salvation. How do we view people who have needs in our sphere of influence? Do we see people as an interruption or as individuals in need of communion with their Heavenly Father? We cannot meet every single need in existence, but we are called to have compassion for those who are in our midst. If we are not living in the intimate relationship that Jesus exemplifies than we will see people as an interruption to what is fast and famous. As God’s people we are called to compassion for our world and our communities with a desire for holistic healing. 

 “At the foot of the cross we receive the spirit of sonship that cries out ‘Abba, Father!’ That reality leads us into word and deed living where we join in God’s work to see holistic healing come. Which brings us back again to the foot of the cross.”

Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript


Gospel Community

Ephesians 2:11-22

Are you prepared to do what’s necessary within God’s definition of success?

In Ephesians, Paul describes that the gauge by which we should be measuring ourselves is whether or not we are good at remembering what God has done for us. We must remember that we were once separated from Christ, but we are no longer strangers or without hope. The mature Christian is someone who is able to quickly and deeply remember who we were and where we are going. It does not do us any good if we are only good at doing “church” once a week if we do not know how to build community outside those walls.

I. Remember that we’re designed for community

Paul uses the conflict between the Jews and the Gentiles to illustrate what it means to be part of a gospel community. The intense animosity between these two groups during Paul’s time spans across generations. But, Paul uses this conflict to express what happens when gospel community enters into the hearts of people. Communities are reoriented from a diverse people because when we experience Christ, radical grace becomes the foundational event in our lives. Our history, heritage, language, or race are no longer what identifies us. When we meet someone who has also been affected by Christ’s radical grace we have immediate commonality with them. We were designed to be united within a community marked by the grace that comes through Jesus Christ.

“We are united but different. We defer to one another but there is no hierarchy. We love without fear of being rejected. We serve people’s needs without being motivated to make sure our needs are met.”

II. Remember that there are distortions to community

We can easily bring our own assumptions into our communities which can create distortions because it misses God’s fullest intention for his people. Thus, we need to be aware of common inaccuracies that rob us of true community.

1. Community is Just Connection

When we make community only about connection it becomes a social networking platform based on convenience. If our goal is simply about connection, then it all falls apart when difficulties arise. There must be something that connects us more than what we have in common other than Christ.

2. Community as Counseling

Although community should be a place where we can be vulnerable, honest, and attempting to help one another through life’s struggles, it becomes a problem when we focus so much on these aspects that we only discuss our problems and forget to implement who Christ is in our lives.

3. Community is Just a Bible Study

Of course, we should be eager to learn more about Scripture. However, when a community becomes focused on transferring information rather than being transformed it becomes an issue.

4. Community Becomes a Clique

Cliques can occur when we have developed deep and intimate relationships with the people around us. We may not recognize it at first but this can lead to communities who turn their backs on newcomers because they lack the ability to immediately push people into the same level of camaraderie. We fail to allow newcomers in because we are more comfortable with those we are familiar with. If we alienate others in our communities then we are out of step with gospel community.

It is important to recognize that we cannot have gospel community without the first three aspects. We need connection, scripture study, and to work through sin. The problem comes when we substitute one or more of these aspects with the true unity that comes from access to God.  

“Without Christ we would not know our brother nor could we come to know him because the way is blocked by our own ego”

-Dietrich Bonhoeffer

III. Remember that we are redeemed to a new community

Before Christ came to reconcile all people to God, there was a time in which Gentiles could be killed if they tried to cross the threshold into the Jewish Temple where God’s presence rested. But Christ has brought peace between these two factions by tearing down the dividing wall and inviting all into a new community. Sin separates us from God and others which means we need access that only comes through Christ so that we can be part of the new community that he brings.

“It is not enough to be brought near to God, we need to be brought in.”


Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript


Gospel Identity

2 Corinthians 3:12-4:6

We all know that we are going to die one day but we  tend to push our entire lives towards making a mark on the world that will prove we had significance. We hope to impact the world around us so that when we pass on our lives will live on in people’s memory. It is because of this goal that the idea of being forgotten once we die stings our pride. The sting of being forgotten comes from a misplaced identity. Our identity is where we locate our significance. Identity is what matters the most about us. If our identity is rightly located being forgotten loses its sting. But often our identities are misplaced.

Four areas we misplace our identities:

  1. Our performance-I am what I do

  2. Possessions-I am what I have

  3. Pleasure-I am what I want

  4. Popularity-I am what others think of me

Living Blind

When we do not live every aspect of our lives before Christ we are living blind. Paul says that even when we eat and drink we should be doing so with the glory of God in mind. This means that there is nothing in our lives that is too mundane or basic to be under the umbrella of God’s glory. We are living blind if we do not recognize that everything, including the most foundational aspects of our lives, was made to give glory to God. The issue of living blind emerges when we are consumed with our own story rather than the story of Jesus. We place our identity in our performance, possessions, pleasure, and popularity rather than focusing on how our lives can be joined with creation in giving glory to God. We labor for significance in the wrong places all the while feeling as though we are losing the battle which we are if we do not place our identity in Christ.

We must take an honest account of our lives to determine whether we are living for Christ or for ourselves.

Self-Glory Diagnostic:

  1. We parade in public what should be private

  2. We are too self-referencing

  3. We talk when we should be quiet

  4. We care too much about what people think of us

“Our identity apart from Christ is always misplaced.”

Seeing the Light

The only way that we can come into the light from living blind is through the words of renewal that God has spoken into existence post fall. We are being recreated through Christ into new creations. In order for us to find out who we are we must start with whose we are. The core of our identity is not what we do but who we belong to. This means that everything we do should flow out of an understanding that our identity belongs in Christ. The place of our self is service to one another for the sake of Christ.

“The light coming in the midst of darkness of living for self and shining a light on the glory of Jesus Christ wakes us up to whose we are.”

Becoming who we are

What does it mean to be created for the glory of God?

Glory simply means God’s character and attributes going public for all to see. As we grow in the goodness, grace, and work of God by making him the primary aim of our lives we are being transformed into the image of God so that the world can see God’s character and attributes on display. Greed transforms into generosity, arrogance transforms into humility, and covetousness transforms into satisfaction. What  was lost in the fall is being restored in those who worship the creator and walk in his light. Our identity is not our self-promotion which is where we naturally lean, but as new creations in Christ we are being restored to be reflections of God which is what we were originally created to be in the first place.

“We tell stories that begin and end with us and that’s what makes this so incredibly difficult. That’s also what makes it so incredibly glorious. God is at work in the midst of the body restoring his image in us through one another.”

Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript