Sermon

The Essence of Faith

Mark 5:21-43

What does it look like to live a life of faith? 

Desperate for Jesus (How we come to Him)

Mark describes a story in which Jairus, a leader of the Synagogue, came to Jesus desperate for someone to help his dying daughter. Jairus came to Jesus knowing full well that Jesus already had the reputation of being a trouble-maker in Synagogues as a threat to the status quo. But, Jairus sets aside his position, reputation, and personal safety by falling at the feet of Jesus fraught with fear over the life of his daughter.

As Jesus and Jairus make their way to the sick child, Jesus stops in the middle of the crowd after he feels power come out of him. As it turns out, a woman who had been suffering from severe bleeding for years with no hope of being cured pushed through the crowd and touched Jesus’ cloak healing her instantly. 

These two stories are crucial in understanding God’s grace because the bleeding woman is the antithesis of Jairus. Jairus has wealth, status, and he was an authority in the synagogue. The woman was a social outcast due to her status as “unclean” from the bleeding, she spent all her money on physicians to no avail, and she was cut off from worship in the synagogue. Yet both are unified in their desperation for Jesus to help them in their life altering predicaments. 

“It’s not just sin and suffering that drive us to Christ. It is meant that even in the good times that we should be driven to Christ.”


Delayed by Jesus (How we grow to trust Him)

As we come to Jesus we may come to realize that his timeline is different than ours. First, the woman had been suffering from her illness for twelve years. Second, while Jesus is on the way to heal the dying girl he stops to talk to this woman, which seems to be a far less urgent matter than the task he was already on. The point in these two scenarios is that the timing of Jesus is not bound by our own intuition or urgency. Jesus chooses to give attention to this woman who has been pronounced unclean or unwelcome in the synagogue because his grace is not confined to status or wealth. 

In order for trust in Christ to grow we must understand that the opposite of faith is not doubt, but it is control. Since Jesus is bringing about our good within the delay he will not be controlled by what we think he should do. Faith requires us to relinquish the control we so desperately desire to have in order to place our trust in God’s ability to determine the best course of action. 

“Delayed, for your situation, does not mean denied. It may not be coming as quickly as you would expect, but because of who Jesus is, we can trust that there is something at play in the situation that God knows and we don’t.”

Dependent Upon Jesus (How we remain in Him)

The good news that is revealed from both of these encounters is that Jesus’ grace and love are compatible with delays. The bleeding woman had hoped to be healed incognito, but once she touched Jesus’ cloak he delays the healing of the young girl in order to bring deeper healing to this woman. Jesus requires more from her than she expected when he calls her out, but he responds to her with love and endearment bringing about a restoration that she was not expecting. 

Likewise Jesus requires more of Jairus than he was expecting. Jairus simply wanted Jesus to cure the fever coming over his daughter. When the news comes to both of them that his child had died Jesus asks that Jairus would simply trust in him. The outcome of such faith is that rather than a cure for his daughter Jairus witnesses a resurrection.

These stories reveal three aspects of Jesus’ character which makes him dependable:

  1. His grace is for you: Jesus forces Jairus to wait in order to give full attention to a woman who had zero status and power in the culture of his day because his grace is for both of them. Jesus’ grace is for us regardless of who we are or what we’ve done.

  2. His power is for you: We see Jesus’ power conquers our greatest enemy: death. Jesus grabs the young girl by the hand and raises her from death and he will do the same for you. The cross is a reminder that Jesus has power over death and he will gently pull us up from the curse of death.

  3. He became weak for you: In Jesus’ humanity we see a weakness after power comes out from him which was used to heal the bleeding woman. This is foreshadowing the weakness Jesus takes upon himself on the cross in order that we may live in God’s power. 

“The delays of God mean that we will sacrifice more than we thought and we will gain more than we hoped.”

Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript


The Power and Goodness of Christ

Mark 4:35-5:20

The apocalyptic literature of Daniel sets up the valuable truth that Jesus is both abundantly powerful and abundantly good. Daniel Chapter 7 dives into a vision of four beasts that erupt from the sea. Each beast is meant to represent the human powers of Babylon, Persia, Greece, and Rome. In the time that Mark’s Gospel was written the audience consisted of Roman citizens who were facing persecution and death from Caesar Nero. Mark wants his audience to connect the power and goodness of Jesus in the midst of the powerful evil they find themselves in.

A Great Power

Throughout the scriptures we see that water is often viewed as chaotic darkness. When the Jewish people thought of the sea they thought of the clash between order and chaos or the place where God and evil rage against each other. Mark tells us the story of when the disciples were on a boat in the midst of an intense storm. When they look to Jesus for help they are surprised to find him sleeping. In pure terror the disciples wake Jesus up and he immediately rebukes the wind and the storm immediately ceases. The power of Jesus takes the intensity of a storm and commands it into a deep calm. The disciples were astonished at the display of Jesus’ power because they know from the scriptures that only the power of God can control the sea. In this story, Jesus does not conjure a higher power to deal with the storm, but he speaks directly to the wind because there is no higher power than the power Jesus has.


“[Jesus is] the creator of all things with unmatched and unmanageable power and the chaos of the sea is at [his] command.” 

A Great Compassion

When it comes to storms in our lives we can often become reductionistic in our views to the problems at hand. We may think that we simply need to move somewhere else or change a minor detail in our physical, mental, or spiritual lives rather than work on the depths of our problems. But, scriptures gives weight to our physical, mental, moral and spiritual selves and understands that they interlock which means they affect one another. Too often we reduce our world to the physical reality that we can see, touch, poke, or prod. But, there is a deep reality that is missed when we only focus on the physical. After Jesus calmed the storm the disciples ran into a demon possessed man who is so powerful that he is unable to be chained or controlled by anyone. The demon possessed man mimics the reality of what we run to for comfort in the midst of negative circumstances such as: isolation, bondage to addiction, or harming ourselves which doesn’t always mean physical harm. But the goodness of Jesus is demonstrated because he goes to the furthest depths for this man so that we can have the hope that Jesus will come rescue us from the depths of our chaos. 


In the midst of the powerful legion within this man Jesus shows his power by forcing the unclean spirits into the pigs who then drowned in the sea. The connection here is that Daniel sees a vision of a power that will engulf the world, but we see Jesus coming in the midst of this legion and he brings redemption, healing, and restoration. We see Christ’s power over what seems to be the most unimaginable power in the world. The demon possessed man is completely restored due to the deep healing of Jesus.  


“If we reject personal spiritual evil we will be blind to a significant power at work that stirs up our struggle and sin and creates chaos.” 



A Great Fear

Throughout each of these narratives there is an intense fear woven throughout. Fear of the storm, Jesus’ power, and the fear of the demoniac. Fear rises when we find ourselves in the midst of a power that we cannot control. The differences between the power of the storm, the demoniac, and Jesus is that Jesus is the only one that loves us. Just like the other powers we are unable to control the power of Jesus, but we can rest easy knowing that he is good. If the disciples had known Christ’s love and unlimited power they would have been able to remain calm within the storm. We often think that if Jesus loves us that he would not let us go through the storms of our lives, but this is not a Biblical view of Jesus’ love. Rather we should focus on the authority, power, and care of Jesus in the midst of the difficulties that arise in our lives. 


“If we believe he is powerful but not good we are driven away from him. If we believe he is good but not powerful we are driven to pity him. But, if we believe he is good and powerful we are driven to trust him in any and every season of life.”




Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript


Slaves Set Free

Mark 3:7-35

Jesus did not come to simply fix the sin or moral problems of the individual. Jesus is Israel’s long awaited Messiah; God’s anointed one. Jesus came to liberate everyone from captivity of the dark powers within this world. Jesus came to set us free from the wickedness and power plays of the kingdoms that seek to bring us down with their hellbent agendas. It is difficult in our modern views to think about the ideas of slavery or the power that modern kingdoms seek to control, but Jesus’ gospel of liberation, freedom, reconciliation, and redemption are just as potent against powerhouses who falsely seek authority as it was in his day. 

“Jesus did not come to merely dismiss our minor imperfections or show us a more moral or better way of life. He came to liberate us from spiritual slavery.”

Just like Israel, we can all become enslaved to our own desires which acts out as rebellion against God. The tragedy in Israel’s story is that even when they were God’s covenant family they polluted their own land by choosing to rebel, insult, and fight against God’s Holy Spirit who was in their midst. Israel defaced their temples by putting up idols as physical  representations of the dark powers which ruled the pagan nations around them. Isaiah prophesied a new exodus would be lead directly by God’s spirit present in the Messiah. This Messiah would forgive the sins of the people thus freeing them from demonic bondage.  

“The people of Israel had become enslaved to their own passions; their own depravities. Enslaved to the wicked and hostile world around them.”

It is crucial to remember that Jesus does not call sinners and tax collectors to show them that there isn’t anything wrong with their actions nor to condone the fact that the pharisees were engaging with pagan slave masters. The point is that Jesus calls the worst and most vile enemies of God because if God’s restorative grace is not for them it is not for anyone. 

“This Messiah would forgive the sins of the people setting them free from demonic bondage.”

The scene is set with a confrontation of cosmic proportions when the Scribes accuse Jesus of having power from Beelzebul rather than the Holy Spirit. But, Jesus declares his authority comes from the God who promised to rescue his people and cast down all other rivals to His kingdom. Jesus’ exorcisms throughout his ministry are not just morality plays about individual deliverance, but they are the evidence of the cosmic upheaval of the pagan powers surrounding God’s people. The dark kingdoms of this world are being overthrown and their tyrants are being cast down and plundered. Jesus’ liberation from the self inflicted wounds of idolatry and spiritual adultery is unfolding before the watching crowds. Jesus declares that the kingdom which sets the enslaved free is available for those who would believe the gospel.

“The beginning of the new exodus is exactly what the good news, the gospel, is all about. God’s Holy Spirit returning once again to dwell with His people...this Spirit would be present in the Messiah and he would do all of this by the power of God.”

Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript

A Deeper Healing

Mark 2:1-12

Jesus drives us deeper than our perceived need

The gospel of Mark tells a well known story of a paralytic man who wanted to see Jesus; but because the crowd surrounding Jesus was so compact the only way to get to him was for his friends to lower him down through the roof of the building that Jesus was in. In a time where the inability to be independent was a massive burden, the paralytic man was hoping to be healed by the only being who could do such a miraculous work. However, we notice that Jesus does not heal the physical ailments of the man immediately, but his first words are “Son, your sins are forgiven.” This is because the man needs a deeper healing than just his physical maladies. It is a completely understandable desire for this man to want to be able to move his body as it should and it is not a bad desire. But Jesus sees that it doesn’t go deep enough because it doesn’t heal the heart. Jesus will not give us our strongest desire until he is our strongest desire. If our strongest desire is anything beyond Jesus, we will be devastated when it fails.

“Whatever your need is it is meant to drive you to Jesus who will take you deeper.” 


Jesus meets us in our need with His aggressive grace

As our need drives us to Jesus, he meets us in the midst of our struggle with his aggressive grace. It is rather strange that Jesus offers forgiveness to the paralytic man even though it seems he came to Jesus for other reasons besides repentance. However, Jesus saw the paralytic man’s faith through his eager desire to get to Jesus even within his powerlessness. This man’s actions mimic our own lives in that we come powerless towards Christ and cast ourselves on his mercy. It is not an attempt to buy God’s favor because grace is not earned. Faith is not earning Christ’s grace, but is trusting in his ability to deeply heal us holistically. When Jesus sees the glimpse of faith in the paralytic man and the actions of his friends, he responds with disproportionate grace. We may not always know how to put words to the weight of our afflictions, but as we ache towards Christ he meets us with his aggressive grace.

“If [Jesus] were not aggressive with his grace, none of us would have a saving faith because faith is not a virtue it is a gift.” 

Jesus overcomes our need with the ultimate healing

In this passage we see Jesus answering a question about his identity. When Jesus declares the paralytic man’s sins are forgiven the scribes are confused because sin can only be forgiven by the one who is sinned against. God is the only one who can forgive sins because all sin is an offense to Him. The scribes become perplexed at Jesus of Nazareth who claims to have the power to forgive this man’s sins which would only be possible if he were God. The scribes cannot verify that man’s sins are forgiven, but to show that Jesus has the authority to forgive sins he commands the paralyzed man to get up, pick up his mat, and to walk home. Jesus verifies his ability to forgive sins by expressing his authority in something that seems impossible. 

The truth is that sin and brokenness are inextricably linked together. We have all sinned and have been sinned against which always brings brokenness to our lives. The good news of the gospel is all of that is healed in Jesus Christ. The deep need we have for our sins to be forgiven, our brokenness healed and the deepest desires of our hearts to be fulfilled is all healed because Jesus is healing all. 

“Sin needs forgiving and brokenness needs healing and Jesus does both. 

This is the deeper healing.”

Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript


A New Kind of Day

Mark 1:35-45

It is easy for us to live in such a busy pacing of life that the roots of our hearts and home are weakened with rot. We currently live in a culture that compounds on our already busy schedules with requests to volunteer or serve above and beyond what we already do. The technological age that we live in makes it nearly impossible for us to get away from the business that looms over us. We must learn a new way to go about our day so that our lives produce fruit in our lives rather than business.

Being Before Doing...

When our lives become overwhelming with our business, prayer and solitude are the first aspects that we leave behind which, ironically, are what we need most. The Gospel of Mark shows that the busier Jesus was the more intentional he became about prayer and communion with the Father. Jesus teaches us that our lives depend on communion with the Father. 

Jesus’ prayer life is incredibly intentional and intimate even when crowds of people were vying for his attention. Jesus understood that his priorities were geared towards being with God first and meeting the needs of others second. We cannot meet the needs of others fruitfully if we are not first laying the foundation of intimate relationship with God. 

“The degree that you know the Fatherly love of God is the degree that you do not need power, comfort, control and approval...we live out the freedom we have in Christ through prayer.”

...Produces Word and Deed Living...

Jesus was the first rabbi in history to ever suggest that we should have a fatherly view of God. Jesus’ prayer life reminds us that relationship with God is oriented around who we are and not what we do. Word and deed living is produced from a being before doing perspective. It is not being without doing it’s simply understanding that our being, identified with God, is what produces fruitful doing. Humans have more needs than just the physical reality of what they/we can see. There is a spiritual need that people do not see as readily which must be addressed in order for ultimate healing to come into their lives. When we are feeding our bodies on a spiritual level as well as physical we become a more holistic person which opens the door for word and deed living.  

“Christians must be word and deed people which means we are people who do not despise the world or reflect it because they are utterly different from the world.”

...Which Results in Holistic Healing

As we go about our day as word and deed people we see that we are joining God and his work which results in a comprehensive salvation. How do we view people who have needs in our sphere of influence? Do we see people as an interruption or as individuals in need of communion with their Heavenly Father? We cannot meet every single need in existence, but we are called to have compassion for those who are in our midst. If we are not living in the intimate relationship that Jesus exemplifies than we will see people as an interruption to what is fast and famous. As God’s people we are called to compassion for our world and our communities with a desire for holistic healing. 

 “At the foot of the cross we receive the spirit of sonship that cries out ‘Abba, Father!’ That reality leads us into word and deed living where we join in God’s work to see holistic healing come. Which brings us back again to the foot of the cross.”

Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript


Kingdom Authority

Mark 1:21-34

An Undeniable Authority

The Gospel of Mark unpacks the difference in Jesus’ authority from other Jewish leaders when he visits the synagogue. The Jewish community would gather at the synagogue to be taught by scribes who would often quote well known rabbis in order to give their teaching authority. However, Jesus was different from these teachers of the Torah. Jesus did not speak authoritatively in the academic sense, but spoke in a manner that gave him rule, dominion and power. Immediately Jesus demonstrates this power by rebuking the demon out of a man. Jesus showed his authority in his teaching by demonstrating his power over unclean spirits.

Jesus is the author of all creation which means that there is an in depth knowledge and authority that can only be shown by the one whom all creation is subject to. Those witnessing Jesus’ power could not articulate it, but they were experiencing the authority of the author of all creation.

A Healing Authority

The undeniable authority that Jesus has leads to a healing authority. Jesus’ authority expresses itself in mending, renewing, and healing. As the kingdom fleshes itself out in our lives the brokenness we experience becomes renewed under the authority of Christ. This healing is both spiritual and physical because God’s good creation is not just spiritual but is physical as well. We must remember that what we do in day to day life of the physical realm is important. Jesus came to redeem all things and as we join with him in his work to renew creation what we do with our lives matters.

Jesus’ power and healing authority is the same today as it was in the synagogue all those years ago. In the midst of the inconsolable things of life, Jesus has healing power over our lives. Even though everything won’t be fixed here and now we have hope that Jesus will one day renew all things.

How is Jesus’ Authority Demonstrated?

  1. There is a time coming when all sin will be done away with, and brokenness in every form will be healed.

  2. We should join Jesus in asking God for healing

  3. Recognizing that the broken aspects of our lives are not defeats

“Inconsolable things’ are the sins and miseries that will not be eradicated until heaven comes home, the things that only Jesus, and no one of us, can overcome. We cannot expect to change what Jesus has left unfixed for the moment. The presence of inconsolable things does not mean the absence of Jesus’ power, however. Rather, it establishes the context for it. There in the midst of what is inconsolable to us, the true unique nature and quality of Jesus’s power shows itself to be unlike any other power we have seen.”

—Zack Eswine

A Resurrecting Authority

Jesus’ authority does not subjugate as the kingdoms of this world do. It does not destroy as kings of this world tend to do. Jesus’ authority resurrects, revives, and brings life. When we are healed by Jesus’ resurrection power it leads us to serve the kingdom that has true healing authority. Our lives become marked by hospitality and generosity as we begin building life giving communities right where we are. When Jesus’ authority comes to bear in our lives it gives us a new sense of priorities that reverses the need for dominating others. We do not do this in order to pay anything back but experiencing the healing authority of the kingdom blooms a desire to spread to others what our Savior has done for us.  

In the midst of this we must be careful that we do not confuse business with service. When we see all the inconsolable things of life it can be easy for us to serve in ways that are not effective. We must be careful that we do not trade true Christ honoring service for anxious business. Now, sometimes this comes into our lives because we see all the inconsolable problems of life which makes us apathetic because there is so much that we do not know what to do.

But there are two other reasons that tend to surface in our business:

1. We become busy in our vanity

2. We become busy in our laziness

“In the midst of the inconsolable things of life we have to distinguish from business and service. Business often masquerades as service...a busy Christian is a blasphemous desire to do God’s work for Him.”

Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript

Old News is Good News

Mark 1:1-13

Mark begins his gospel reminding us that the good news occurs in the midst of a grand narrative that has been in the works long before his time. The announcement of a coming Messiah has been prophesied for hundreds of years. God has been at work redeeming his people and Jesus is the climax of that rescue. Mark expresses the importance of remembering how God has worked with the nation of Israel so that we may fully understand the significance of Jesus’ actions.

The Exile

Mark begins his gospel by pointing back to the Prophet Isaiah. Prophets in the Old Testament were responsible for pushing Israel back into the covenant/commitment with God. Prophets were meant to help drive people back into right relationship with God when they began to fall astray. The first section of Isaiah reveals a time when Israel was falling away from their covenant with God to the point that they were becoming spiritually dead leading to their exile. Exile is a term referring to a physical manifestation of the spiritually dead state in which Israel finds themselves. God pushes Israel away from his presence and out of the land promised to them because of their decision to move away from their commitment to God. But, there is good news in the second part of Isaiah which foretells the pinnacle point of God’s grace in a coming Messiah. Our sin places us into a place of exile, but God promises to send one who will lead us out of exile permanently.

“Repentance is not just the turning away from death it is turning to life.”

A New Exodus

Mark continues his gospel with the baptism of Jesus. The imagery of water and sin are constantly placed together in scripture. Whenever we see sin in the Bible we see water soon after because it is a symbol for God cleansing the world. During Noah’s time, God cleanses the world of sin in the waters of judgment. In Egypt, we see the Israelites passed over by the blood of a lamb while the Egyptians are later engulfed in water. These symbols are key elements in Jesus’ baptism. Now that the righteous one has entered the judgment waters and the Heavens have opened up in peace we may be certain that if we enter the grave in Christ we will rise again with Christ. Jesus is the promised one who gives us the new exodus out of the exile brought by our sin.

“Christianity is not just a better moral code or sentimental sweet nothings. It is a new identity as a beloved child of God.”

The Wilderness

Jesus leads us through a new exodus and into the wilderness. When we read about wilderness and temptation we often assume that it is a punishment because God is displeased with us. But what if it is a sign that God is at work within us? Unlike Israel's time in the wilderness where God’s people continued to rebel, Jesus is sent in the wilderness but continues in obedience towards God. Surprisingly, scripture also describes the wilderness as an intimate time between God and his people. Wilderness is where people are stripped of their strength, dependencies and idols turning their attention towards God. Although there are certainly times where we place ourselves into an unpleasant wilderness due to our actions, we cannot immediately assume that wilderness is a result of God’s displeasure; rather, it is God’s refinement so that we find pleasure in Him.

“As Christians we are always in one of three phases. You are either entering a season of wilderness, in a season of wilderness, or exiting a season of wilderness. But be encouraged because what it means is that your Heavenly Father is refining you.”

Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript


Gospel Community

Ephesians 2:11-22

Are you prepared to do what’s necessary within God’s definition of success?

In Ephesians, Paul describes that the gauge by which we should be measuring ourselves is whether or not we are good at remembering what God has done for us. We must remember that we were once separated from Christ, but we are no longer strangers or without hope. The mature Christian is someone who is able to quickly and deeply remember who we were and where we are going. It does not do us any good if we are only good at doing “church” once a week if we do not know how to build community outside those walls.

I. Remember that we’re designed for community

Paul uses the conflict between the Jews and the Gentiles to illustrate what it means to be part of a gospel community. The intense animosity between these two groups during Paul’s time spans across generations. But, Paul uses this conflict to express what happens when gospel community enters into the hearts of people. Communities are reoriented from a diverse people because when we experience Christ, radical grace becomes the foundational event in our lives. Our history, heritage, language, or race are no longer what identifies us. When we meet someone who has also been affected by Christ’s radical grace we have immediate commonality with them. We were designed to be united within a community marked by the grace that comes through Jesus Christ.

“We are united but different. We defer to one another but there is no hierarchy. We love without fear of being rejected. We serve people’s needs without being motivated to make sure our needs are met.”

II. Remember that there are distortions to community

We can easily bring our own assumptions into our communities which can create distortions because it misses God’s fullest intention for his people. Thus, we need to be aware of common inaccuracies that rob us of true community.

1. Community is Just Connection

When we make community only about connection it becomes a social networking platform based on convenience. If our goal is simply about connection, then it all falls apart when difficulties arise. There must be something that connects us more than what we have in common other than Christ.

2. Community as Counseling

Although community should be a place where we can be vulnerable, honest, and attempting to help one another through life’s struggles, it becomes a problem when we focus so much on these aspects that we only discuss our problems and forget to implement who Christ is in our lives.

3. Community is Just a Bible Study

Of course, we should be eager to learn more about Scripture. However, when a community becomes focused on transferring information rather than being transformed it becomes an issue.

4. Community Becomes a Clique

Cliques can occur when we have developed deep and intimate relationships with the people around us. We may not recognize it at first but this can lead to communities who turn their backs on newcomers because they lack the ability to immediately push people into the same level of camaraderie. We fail to allow newcomers in because we are more comfortable with those we are familiar with. If we alienate others in our communities then we are out of step with gospel community.

It is important to recognize that we cannot have gospel community without the first three aspects. We need connection, scripture study, and to work through sin. The problem comes when we substitute one or more of these aspects with the true unity that comes from access to God.  

“Without Christ we would not know our brother nor could we come to know him because the way is blocked by our own ego”

-Dietrich Bonhoeffer

III. Remember that we are redeemed to a new community

Before Christ came to reconcile all people to God, there was a time in which Gentiles could be killed if they tried to cross the threshold into the Jewish Temple where God’s presence rested. But Christ has brought peace between these two factions by tearing down the dividing wall and inviting all into a new community. Sin separates us from God and others which means we need access that only comes through Christ so that we can be part of the new community that he brings.

“It is not enough to be brought near to God, we need to be brought in.”


Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript


Gospel Rhythms

1 Timothy 4:6-10

What is in the Way?

Disciples are those who learn and follow the way of Jesus’ life. But, what does it mean to follow Jesus or to grow as a disciple? How do you start? It can be easy to become quickly overwhelmed by our daily schedules while simultaneously trying to figure out how discipleship fits into the ebbs and flows of life.  Paul seems to say that two common outcomes of people trying to jumpstart their discipleship is either going with the cultural flow of non biblical ideas hoping for just a piece of life that we are searching for or just giving up. Paul gives encouragement to people who are trying to fake it until they make it or those have just given up. Often times we end up feeling burnt out on discipleship when in reality we never truly practiced authentic discipleship because we were grasping for it in the wrong places.


Reorientation around the Gospel

In order for healthy discipleship to occur we must have a reorientation around the gospel. We see what it looks like to be godly through the life of Jesus Christ. In order to be godly we must look at the gospel of Christ because it is only through the gospel that we come to know and gravitate towards Christ. Therefore, if we want to know what it means to train in godliness we must reorient our lives around the aspects of the gospel.

Aspects of the Gospel:

  1. Cross: the historical facts of what happened at the cross and Christ’s resurrection

  2. Kingdom: Jesus is on the throne of the true kingdom and it is coming in its fullness

  3. Grace: While we were sinners Christ died for us by God’s grace and we extend that grace to others

  4. Glory: The glorious demonstration of God’s very heart and love to redeem all creation

The Rhythms of life which are the outcome of Gospel Aspects:

  1. Study: the cross

  2. Serve: the king

  3. Share: his grace

  4. Seek: his glory

“True life isn’t about orienting my life around church things or whatever happens to be popular right now. True life in Jesus Christ is about reorienting our lives and the church around the whole gospel.”

The Plan for Growing in Godliness

1. We start with our identity:

We don’t want to start with the outcome of what we hope to achieve. But, we start with the fact that our identity is in Christ meaning we are a new creation within a new kingdom. We are called to strive because of who we are in Jesus.

As Christians, we live our lives in two contexts. The first is the gathering which is where we are formed and rehearse the gospel. The second is scattering which is wherever God has placed our sphere of influence and the relationships we have with the people around us.  

“Grace isn’t opposed to effort, it’s opposed to earning”

-Dallas Willard

2. The Process

Aspect: Cross Kingdom Grace Glory

Rhythm: Study: The Cross Serve: The King Share: His Grace Seek: His Glory

Gather: Rehearse the truth Stewardship Come & See God’s Glory in Worship

Scatter: Live the truth Serve Others Go & Be God’s Glory in Prayer

3. Start Small

It is important to understand which practices we are already implementing in our daily lives and those that we need to start including in our routines.  Remember that transformation is a journey that takes time so start small with one rhythm and then slowly stack on more rhythms and more time in each rhythm.  If you struggle with studying God’s word consider just reading for five minutes at the start of your day. Find where you struggle, begin to incorporate the practices to strengthen that struggle, and give yourself time/grace as you begin your journey in discipleship to Jesus Christ.

“While bodily training is of some value, godliness is of value in every way as it holds promise for the present life and also for the life to come.”


Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript


Gospel Renewal

Romans 3:21-26

Once we are in Christ we begin a continuous process of renewal. Gospel renewal means that the work of God continues after we are saved. God is not done with us. It is apparent that humans were created to worship something. We will either worship ourselves, creation, our desires or God. When we give ourselves to Christ we are telling the world that we are seeking to worship God alone. Thus the process begins in which God will renew the desires we once had for the flesh into desires that bring about His glory into the world. We are being renewed day by day into the image of our creator.

But what is the meaning of Gospel Renewal?

We have been saved from the penalty of sin

We were made to reflect God’s glory, but time and again we choose to disregard love for God and replace it with lesser loves. We look to our jobs to fulfill our identity or we look for the achievements of our lives to give us significance. We constantly look for places other than the worship of God to find satisfaction. It is because we are inclined to reject God’s love and substitute it for worldly desires that Paul points out in Romans that there is not one who is righteous. We have turned to find glory in creation or ourselves rather than accepting the glory of God. This is a crucial point because without an understanding of the bitterness of our sin we cannot be ready to accept the sweetness of Jesus Christ.

God does not want to give us some quick fix for our tendencies towards hatred over love, lust over fidelity, abuse over tenderness, but He wants to completely renew our inclinations to mimic His glory, goodness, and beauty by experiencing the fullness of His presence which is only made possible by the sacrifice of Jesus Christ. God does not just simply sweep our sin under the rug, but he actively deals with it so that we may become renewed creations through the grace that is given to us by the blood of Jesus. We do not need to work to overcome our shame or guilt because God has placed the wrath we deserve on Jesus so that we may be given a renewed life.

“The best thing that could ever be created is the world

God created for us to live in.”

We are being saved from the power of sin

Salvation by grace alone creates an opportunity for cheap grace. Cheap grace occurs when we use the renewed life that God has given us in order to excuse our sinful acts. Paul declares that those who are baptized in Christ have been buried with Christ in death so that we may walk in the newness of life. Once we have accepted the renewed life given to us by God we can no longer actively seek to continue in our sinful nature. If we have been baptized in Christ we have been held under the waters of judgement and we have been raised to newness of life. We now have the glory and spirit of God living within us which means our lives are fundamentally different. We must consider ourselves dead to sin and alive to God through Christ Jesus. Renewal in the gospel is not just about one moment of forgiveness, but it means that we walk within this renewed life daily.

God’s means for renewal and freedom from the power of sin:

1) Identity in Christ

God looks upon us with delight and he is pleased with us because of our identity in Jesus Christ. God does not pour shame upon our mistakes but washes his judgement over Jesus so that we are resurrected alongside him in newness of life.

2) We have power in the Spirit of God

We have been given a renewed desire within the holy character of God through his Spirit. It cultivates a desire of holiness, obedience, and guides us as we seek life in Him. The Holy Spirit gives us the power to overcome our fleshly desires so that we can serve God in wholeness.

“Gospel renewal does not come from feeling more guilty or demanding more of ourselves. Gospel renewal comes by God’s means”

We will be saved from the presence of sin

One day God will make all things new bringing back the glory that existed before the fall. We are pilgrimaging towards the day that death and sin will no longer exist. The promise that we will be saved from the very presence of sin guarantees complete renewal of all of creation. We have confidence that all things will come together for the good of those who are in Jesus since the outcome of the new Jerusalem is assured through God’s promise that he will make it a reality himself. This promise gives us a hope that allows us to endure the trials, tribulations, and temptations that come our way because we know the truth that God will end the tension that we face. God promises that one day we will be free from the presence of our fleshly desires and will live in a redeemed glorified state where we will no longer have to fight the tension of living for him.


Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript


Gospel Conversion

Matthew 28:16-20

Conversion has become a major taboo in our culture today. Converting people is something that we do not often hear in civilized conversation because of the negative connotations that are often affiliated with it. In order to understand the importance of conversion we need to come to an understanding of what conversion means. The most basic definition of conversion is the process of changing or causing something to change from one form to another. It is a complete transformation. Conversion means that you become something that you weren’t before. Rather than conversion being a manipulative tool or a way to control the behaviors that we find unsavory, conversion is the transformation from death in our sin to being alive in Jesus Christ.

Why would we want anyone to be Converted?

A major theme in the gospel of Matthew is that God has been at work to redeem the world throughout history. A common question that exists in the midst of humanity’s shortcomings is how will God remove the broken intentions and desires that exist in our world? How will God reconcile his creation to himself? The answer is that one will come who will bridge the gap between Heaven and Earth who is Jesus Christ. Every human being has been seeking satisfaction in earthly appetites which always leaves them grasping at straws. Every human longing, want, and desire was ultimately desiring Jesus Christ and now he has come. We want to convert people because every longing that they have can be fulfilled in Jesus whether they know it or not. Everything else in this world will pass away except the promises of Jesus who vehemently states that he will be with us forever.

“Why would we want anyone to experience this new birth, eyes opened to see Jesus? It’s because it is everything they have ever desired, whether they realize it or not.”

Three Distorted Approaches to Making Disciples

When we approach people with the proposition of conversion we must remember that we are not the ones who are transforming them because God is the only one who has that power. In one of the last conversations Jesus had with his disciples he warned them that there would be many who would claim to know Christ but would end up leading people astray. We must be aware of how we are representing Christ so that we do not unintentionally lead others away from truth.

1. The Parrot Approach

The Parrot approach focuses on converting the mind. Proper conversion is not about getting other people to think like us or mimic our jargon. The pitfall in this approach is that we often begin to think that people are born again if they just say the right religious phrases or have the correct theological answers. One could be saying all the right things or repeating what we have told them, but could still be dead inside. Following Christ is about more than mere information, it is about complete transformation. The outcome of the Parrot Approach is not disciples of Christ, but disciples of us.

2. The Puppet Approach

The Puppet approach focuses on colonizing the will of others. Jesus explains that disciples will come from every tongue, tribe, and nation. Jesus will renew humanity right in the culture that they are in. This emphasizes the fact that people do not have to look exactly like us to be followers of Christ. Too often we make conversion about acting exactly like us. In this approach, people live bound in the strings of our expectations rather than living in the freedom of their own transformed worship to Christ.

3. The Party Approach

The Party approach focuses on emotional highs for conversion. Jesus promises to be with us to the end of the age which is eternal rather than a moment or a season. Regardless of how we feel in a moment of our lives, God’s word still rings true. We often think that conversion is about experiencing a series of emotionally charged moments so that others will finally want to give their lives to Christ. Jesus wants to transform the inside not leave us endlessly searching for another high.

“We are commissioned to go after more than just right thinking, right actions, or right feelings. Jesus wants the whole person.”


The Key to True Conversion

The key to conversion is to understand that we are commissioned and God converts. It is not in our own power that conversion happens because in those circumstances we end up manipulating minds, wills, and emotions. When we allow God to convert others it leads to true transformation of the whole person. Conversion must be rooted in the power of Jesus Christ not rooted in our own power, personality, or persuasion. If we allow God to get their heart the rest will follow.

Then what is our task in the conversion process?

1. Proclaim the gospel

The best way to learn how to share the gospel is to allow God to do a work through the gospel in our own lives. People need to see that there is one who is true and on high in our lives rather than hearing people who preach from a pedestal. We need to share how Jesus has given us the newness of life which is offered to all.

2. Pray

Everyone around us is seeking to know the Lord. Sometimes we take the weight of conversion on our backs by believing we must persuade people into conversion, but it is only in God’s power. Once they are converted it is our job to bring them into the fold and teach them how to live a Christ centered life. So, ask God to change the hearts of the people around you. Ask God to give you the opportunity to share how Jesus has changed your life forever.

“What the heart most wants, the mind finds reasonable, the will finds doable, and the emotions find desirable.”

-Timothy Keller


Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript