Redlands church

A Deeper Healing

Mark 2:1-12

Jesus drives us deeper than our perceived need

The gospel of Mark tells a well known story of a paralytic man who wanted to see Jesus; but because the crowd surrounding Jesus was so compact the only way to get to him was for his friends to lower him down through the roof of the building that Jesus was in. In a time where the inability to be independent was a massive burden, the paralytic man was hoping to be healed by the only being who could do such a miraculous work. However, we notice that Jesus does not heal the physical ailments of the man immediately, but his first words are “Son, your sins are forgiven.” This is because the man needs a deeper healing than just his physical maladies. It is a completely understandable desire for this man to want to be able to move his body as it should and it is not a bad desire. But Jesus sees that it doesn’t go deep enough because it doesn’t heal the heart. Jesus will not give us our strongest desire until he is our strongest desire. If our strongest desire is anything beyond Jesus, we will be devastated when it fails.

“Whatever your need is it is meant to drive you to Jesus who will take you deeper.” 


Jesus meets us in our need with His aggressive grace

As our need drives us to Jesus, he meets us in the midst of our struggle with his aggressive grace. It is rather strange that Jesus offers forgiveness to the paralytic man even though it seems he came to Jesus for other reasons besides repentance. However, Jesus saw the paralytic man’s faith through his eager desire to get to Jesus even within his powerlessness. This man’s actions mimic our own lives in that we come powerless towards Christ and cast ourselves on his mercy. It is not an attempt to buy God’s favor because grace is not earned. Faith is not earning Christ’s grace, but is trusting in his ability to deeply heal us holistically. When Jesus sees the glimpse of faith in the paralytic man and the actions of his friends, he responds with disproportionate grace. We may not always know how to put words to the weight of our afflictions, but as we ache towards Christ he meets us with his aggressive grace.

“If [Jesus] were not aggressive with his grace, none of us would have a saving faith because faith is not a virtue it is a gift.” 

Jesus overcomes our need with the ultimate healing

In this passage we see Jesus answering a question about his identity. When Jesus declares the paralytic man’s sins are forgiven the scribes are confused because sin can only be forgiven by the one who is sinned against. God is the only one who can forgive sins because all sin is an offense to Him. The scribes become perplexed at Jesus of Nazareth who claims to have the power to forgive this man’s sins which would only be possible if he were God. The scribes cannot verify that man’s sins are forgiven, but to show that Jesus has the authority to forgive sins he commands the paralyzed man to get up, pick up his mat, and to walk home. Jesus verifies his ability to forgive sins by expressing his authority in something that seems impossible. 

The truth is that sin and brokenness are inextricably linked together. We have all sinned and have been sinned against which always brings brokenness to our lives. The good news of the gospel is all of that is healed in Jesus Christ. The deep need we have for our sins to be forgiven, our brokenness healed and the deepest desires of our hearts to be fulfilled is all healed because Jesus is healing all. 

“Sin needs forgiving and brokenness needs healing and Jesus does both. 

This is the deeper healing.”

Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript


A New Kind of Day

Mark 1:35-45

It is easy for us to live in such a busy pacing of life that the roots of our hearts and home are weakened with rot. We currently live in a culture that compounds on our already busy schedules with requests to volunteer or serve above and beyond what we already do. The technological age that we live in makes it nearly impossible for us to get away from the business that looms over us. We must learn a new way to go about our day so that our lives produce fruit in our lives rather than business.

Being Before Doing...

When our lives become overwhelming with our business, prayer and solitude are the first aspects that we leave behind which, ironically, are what we need most. The Gospel of Mark shows that the busier Jesus was the more intentional he became about prayer and communion with the Father. Jesus teaches us that our lives depend on communion with the Father. 

Jesus’ prayer life is incredibly intentional and intimate even when crowds of people were vying for his attention. Jesus understood that his priorities were geared towards being with God first and meeting the needs of others second. We cannot meet the needs of others fruitfully if we are not first laying the foundation of intimate relationship with God. 

“The degree that you know the Fatherly love of God is the degree that you do not need power, comfort, control and approval...we live out the freedom we have in Christ through prayer.”

...Produces Word and Deed Living...

Jesus was the first rabbi in history to ever suggest that we should have a fatherly view of God. Jesus’ prayer life reminds us that relationship with God is oriented around who we are and not what we do. Word and deed living is produced from a being before doing perspective. It is not being without doing it’s simply understanding that our being, identified with God, is what produces fruitful doing. Humans have more needs than just the physical reality of what they/we can see. There is a spiritual need that people do not see as readily which must be addressed in order for ultimate healing to come into their lives. When we are feeding our bodies on a spiritual level as well as physical we become a more holistic person which opens the door for word and deed living.  

“Christians must be word and deed people which means we are people who do not despise the world or reflect it because they are utterly different from the world.”

...Which Results in Holistic Healing

As we go about our day as word and deed people we see that we are joining God and his work which results in a comprehensive salvation. How do we view people who have needs in our sphere of influence? Do we see people as an interruption or as individuals in need of communion with their Heavenly Father? We cannot meet every single need in existence, but we are called to have compassion for those who are in our midst. If we are not living in the intimate relationship that Jesus exemplifies than we will see people as an interruption to what is fast and famous. As God’s people we are called to compassion for our world and our communities with a desire for holistic healing. 

 “At the foot of the cross we receive the spirit of sonship that cries out ‘Abba, Father!’ That reality leads us into word and deed living where we join in God’s work to see holistic healing come. Which brings us back again to the foot of the cross.”

Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript


Old News is Good News

Mark 1:1-13

Mark begins his gospel reminding us that the good news occurs in the midst of a grand narrative that has been in the works long before his time. The announcement of a coming Messiah has been prophesied for hundreds of years. God has been at work redeeming his people and Jesus is the climax of that rescue. Mark expresses the importance of remembering how God has worked with the nation of Israel so that we may fully understand the significance of Jesus’ actions.

The Exile

Mark begins his gospel by pointing back to the Prophet Isaiah. Prophets in the Old Testament were responsible for pushing Israel back into the covenant/commitment with God. Prophets were meant to help drive people back into right relationship with God when they began to fall astray. The first section of Isaiah reveals a time when Israel was falling away from their covenant with God to the point that they were becoming spiritually dead leading to their exile. Exile is a term referring to a physical manifestation of the spiritually dead state in which Israel finds themselves. God pushes Israel away from his presence and out of the land promised to them because of their decision to move away from their commitment to God. But, there is good news in the second part of Isaiah which foretells the pinnacle point of God’s grace in a coming Messiah. Our sin places us into a place of exile, but God promises to send one who will lead us out of exile permanently.

“Repentance is not just the turning away from death it is turning to life.”

A New Exodus

Mark continues his gospel with the baptism of Jesus. The imagery of water and sin are constantly placed together in scripture. Whenever we see sin in the Bible we see water soon after because it is a symbol for God cleansing the world. During Noah’s time, God cleanses the world of sin in the waters of judgment. In Egypt, we see the Israelites passed over by the blood of a lamb while the Egyptians are later engulfed in water. These symbols are key elements in Jesus’ baptism. Now that the righteous one has entered the judgment waters and the Heavens have opened up in peace we may be certain that if we enter the grave in Christ we will rise again with Christ. Jesus is the promised one who gives us the new exodus out of the exile brought by our sin.

“Christianity is not just a better moral code or sentimental sweet nothings. It is a new identity as a beloved child of God.”

The Wilderness

Jesus leads us through a new exodus and into the wilderness. When we read about wilderness and temptation we often assume that it is a punishment because God is displeased with us. But what if it is a sign that God is at work within us? Unlike Israel's time in the wilderness where God’s people continued to rebel, Jesus is sent in the wilderness but continues in obedience towards God. Surprisingly, scripture also describes the wilderness as an intimate time between God and his people. Wilderness is where people are stripped of their strength, dependencies and idols turning their attention towards God. Although there are certainly times where we place ourselves into an unpleasant wilderness due to our actions, we cannot immediately assume that wilderness is a result of God’s displeasure; rather, it is God’s refinement so that we find pleasure in Him.

“As Christians we are always in one of three phases. You are either entering a season of wilderness, in a season of wilderness, or exiting a season of wilderness. But be encouraged because what it means is that your Heavenly Father is refining you.”

Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript


The Wonder of Resurrection

Luke 24:1-12

In the difficult seasons of our lives it can be easy to succumb to the coldness and hostility of a broken world. We can become focused on the anxiety we feel to the point that we miss out on the immense beauty that is constantly around us if we were to simply take a moment to look. It may even come to the point that we believe that death, disappointment, and frustration will win out in the end. But on Easter we are reminded of the fact that death does not have the final say. The resurrection reminds us to pause and look at the truth around us rather than the despair we may feel. The truth is that God is at work in bringing life from death.

A Counterintuitive Word

Easter is a reminder that all of our preconceived notions about death are challenged. On the first Easter when the apostles arrived at Jesus’ empty tomb they still believed that death had the final word and so they were perplexed about Jesus’ missing body. They were greeted by two heavenly messengers who asked “why do you seek the living among the dead? He is not here, but has risen.” Any notion that Jesus’ body was stolen or that he falsified his death are taken off the table with this one question. All previous beliefs about death’s power over resurrection power are turned on their heads in light of the risen Lord. The problem is that rather than seeing Jesus in his resurrected glory, the disciples are only given a word of resurrection. This is something we can relate to today because we may not have the obvious view of resurrection power but we have been given a word proclaiming its existence.

“The resurrection isn’t forcefully obvious,

but resurrection and resurrection life is clearly visible.”

A Contrary Belief

We live in the tension of Jesus’ resurrection and our current experience which is that death is final. Just like the disciples, when these contradictory truths collide it is not surprising that we often respond with unbelief. It is important to note that unbelief is not synonymous with a belief in nothing, but simply means that we believe in something else more fervently. When people struggle to believe in the resurrection of Christ it is because they believe in the reality of death and all its affects more robustly.

When we are faced with the death of a loved one, we are often desperate to reassure the one who is departing that their life mattered. Of course, there is nothing wrong with expressing our gratitude towards those who have had a tremendous impact on our lives or reminding them of how much they mean to us, however in these moments we often believe something about death that is not entirely true. We can often push to remind the individual that their life mattered because we erroneously believe that death is about to win, thus snatching the meaning from their lives. A world without resurrection life can lead us into believing that life is a slow surrender to death.

What if death is real, but not final?

What if Jesus is not just past, but present?  

What if Jesus were to meet us here?

Beauty of a Concrete Hope

If resurrection life is true how do we step into it?

The Easter message calls us from our old understanding of death to a new belief in resurrection life. The reality is that death is foreign to us because it was something that was not meant for us, but entered the world with sin. We are all sinned against-some of us in heinous ways- which can cause us to believe in death more than the resurrection life. But the hard truth is that we have also sinned by contributing to the violation of peace and beauty of resurrection life. Humility is the best thing for God’s people because it is there that we trust Christ who takes our sin upon himself. Resurrection life begins when we die to ourselves. The resurrection life tells us that we can finally rest because we do not bring resurrection upon ourselves, but Christ brings it to us.

“We cannot live before we die to ourselves.

When we die to ourselves we become alive in Christ.”


Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript

Sharing our riches in Christ

Philippians 4:14-23

What is Stewardship?

At the end of his letter to the church in Philippi, Paul reiterates his appreciation for their partnership in his ministry. The Philippians have constantly been partners with Paul in his ministry of the gospel and they have shared in his troubles. As we steward the time, talents, and treasures that God has given us to the ministry of the gospel we become partners of the gospel. We have all been given various talents that we can use for furthering the gospel in the world around us. It is by being good stewards of what we have that we actually participate in what God is doing through the church.  Good stewardship is what aligns our hearts and desires with the eternal kingdom of God. It is how we are trained to value, prioritize, and love the things within God’s work of redemption.

“Stewardship is how we learn to invest our very lives in what matters.”

Paul gives the church insight on the crucial principles of good stewardship. As we incorporate these principles into our own lives we can become partners in the work of God’s goodness.

Principles of Stewardship

  1. Practicing generosity rather than presuming generosity

    We must understand that everything that we are given is a gift of mercy from God. Good stewardship requires a generosity with no strings attached. We do not give our time or talents to God and others with an expectation that we will receive back what we have given.

  2. Focused on partnering with people rather than the purchasing of products

    The Kingdom of God is about people not products. Therefore, good stewardship isn’t focusing on the service or product that is given. We are partners with God and other people as we seek out His redeeming work. We must be more focused on the people we serve rather than a commodity.

  3. Long Term rather than Short term commitment

    The Kingdom of God is about people not products. Therefore, good stewardship isn’t focusing on the service or product that is given. We are partners with God and other people as we seek out His redeeming work. We must be more focused on the people we serve rather than a commodity.

The Motivation of Stewardship

  1. Overflowing fruitfulness rather than obligatory gifts

    Giving our finances, time, and talents must come from an overflowing fruitfulness within us. Just as God has given us the gift of salvation without obligation we must be willing to give what we have without expecting anything in return. We live in world with a “I scratch your back you scratch mine” mentality. However, Paul expresses that good stewardship gives without thought of reimbursement.

  2. Pleasing God rather than placating God

    God has made each and every one of us a unique individual. God has given all of us unique and beautiful talents. Within these giftings God has given us the desire to offer up all that we have to Him. As we give all of our resources we fan the flame that preaches the gospel in our lives. When we spend our lives offering the beautiful and unique offerings that only we, with our giftings, can present to the God of the universe, our lives emphasize the beautiful grace that we’ve been given in Jesus.

“And so, stewardship isn’t motivated by an overwhelming sense of guilt, but an overflow of grace. So, why steward? Because, it is an expression of the gospel, that God has fully paid the price of our redemption, and therefore we give not to placate God, but to please God.”

The Riches of Stewardship

If we’re honest, it can be incredibly difficult to give our resources. We can be consumed with the fear that giving up our riches means losing everything we have. But, Paul emphasizes that it is through the stewardship of our resources that we actually discover true riches. Stewardship actually frees us from constantly aiming for riches that will not last and points us in the direction of what is truly eternal: people entering into fellowship with Jesus Christ.

Jesus came to redeem eternal souls. True riches that last forever comes when we invest in the eternal lives of other people. When we see the fruit of eternal souls being reconciled with their loving Father through the saving grace of Jesus Christ we forget to worry about hoarding what we have. As good stewards, we see the intense beauty of redeemed people and push everything that we have towards partnering with God in redeeming a fallen world. All material possessions become insignificant in light of bringing eternal souls to the glory of Jesus Christ.

“True riches, tangibly, is most found when we see others see Jesus. When we see others grow and know Christ.”


Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcription-Lent Guide