Gospel of Mark

The Essence of Faith

Mark 5:21-43

What does it look like to live a life of faith? 

Desperate for Jesus (How we come to Him)

Mark describes a story in which Jairus, a leader of the Synagogue, came to Jesus desperate for someone to help his dying daughter. Jairus came to Jesus knowing full well that Jesus already had the reputation of being a trouble-maker in Synagogues as a threat to the status quo. But, Jairus sets aside his position, reputation, and personal safety by falling at the feet of Jesus fraught with fear over the life of his daughter.

As Jesus and Jairus make their way to the sick child, Jesus stops in the middle of the crowd after he feels power come out of him. As it turns out, a woman who had been suffering from severe bleeding for years with no hope of being cured pushed through the crowd and touched Jesus’ cloak healing her instantly. 

These two stories are crucial in understanding God’s grace because the bleeding woman is the antithesis of Jairus. Jairus has wealth, status, and he was an authority in the synagogue. The woman was a social outcast due to her status as “unclean” from the bleeding, she spent all her money on physicians to no avail, and she was cut off from worship in the synagogue. Yet both are unified in their desperation for Jesus to help them in their life altering predicaments. 

“It’s not just sin and suffering that drive us to Christ. It is meant that even in the good times that we should be driven to Christ.”


Delayed by Jesus (How we grow to trust Him)

As we come to Jesus we may come to realize that his timeline is different than ours. First, the woman had been suffering from her illness for twelve years. Second, while Jesus is on the way to heal the dying girl he stops to talk to this woman, which seems to be a far less urgent matter than the task he was already on. The point in these two scenarios is that the timing of Jesus is not bound by our own intuition or urgency. Jesus chooses to give attention to this woman who has been pronounced unclean or unwelcome in the synagogue because his grace is not confined to status or wealth. 

In order for trust in Christ to grow we must understand that the opposite of faith is not doubt, but it is control. Since Jesus is bringing about our good within the delay he will not be controlled by what we think he should do. Faith requires us to relinquish the control we so desperately desire to have in order to place our trust in God’s ability to determine the best course of action. 

“Delayed, for your situation, does not mean denied. It may not be coming as quickly as you would expect, but because of who Jesus is, we can trust that there is something at play in the situation that God knows and we don’t.”

Dependent Upon Jesus (How we remain in Him)

The good news that is revealed from both of these encounters is that Jesus’ grace and love are compatible with delays. The bleeding woman had hoped to be healed incognito, but once she touched Jesus’ cloak he delays the healing of the young girl in order to bring deeper healing to this woman. Jesus requires more from her than she expected when he calls her out, but he responds to her with love and endearment bringing about a restoration that she was not expecting. 

Likewise Jesus requires more of Jairus than he was expecting. Jairus simply wanted Jesus to cure the fever coming over his daughter. When the news comes to both of them that his child had died Jesus asks that Jairus would simply trust in him. The outcome of such faith is that rather than a cure for his daughter Jairus witnesses a resurrection.

These stories reveal three aspects of Jesus’ character which makes him dependable:

  1. His grace is for you: Jesus forces Jairus to wait in order to give full attention to a woman who had zero status and power in the culture of his day because his grace is for both of them. Jesus’ grace is for us regardless of who we are or what we’ve done.

  2. His power is for you: We see Jesus’ power conquers our greatest enemy: death. Jesus grabs the young girl by the hand and raises her from death and he will do the same for you. The cross is a reminder that Jesus has power over death and he will gently pull us up from the curse of death.

  3. He became weak for you: In Jesus’ humanity we see a weakness after power comes out from him which was used to heal the bleeding woman. This is foreshadowing the weakness Jesus takes upon himself on the cross in order that we may live in God’s power. 

“The delays of God mean that we will sacrifice more than we thought and we will gain more than we hoped.”

Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript


A New Kind of Day

Mark 1:35-45

It is easy for us to live in such a busy pacing of life that the roots of our hearts and home are weakened with rot. We currently live in a culture that compounds on our already busy schedules with requests to volunteer or serve above and beyond what we already do. The technological age that we live in makes it nearly impossible for us to get away from the business that looms over us. We must learn a new way to go about our day so that our lives produce fruit in our lives rather than business.

Being Before Doing...

When our lives become overwhelming with our business, prayer and solitude are the first aspects that we leave behind which, ironically, are what we need most. The Gospel of Mark shows that the busier Jesus was the more intentional he became about prayer and communion with the Father. Jesus teaches us that our lives depend on communion with the Father. 

Jesus’ prayer life is incredibly intentional and intimate even when crowds of people were vying for his attention. Jesus understood that his priorities were geared towards being with God first and meeting the needs of others second. We cannot meet the needs of others fruitfully if we are not first laying the foundation of intimate relationship with God. 

“The degree that you know the Fatherly love of God is the degree that you do not need power, comfort, control and approval...we live out the freedom we have in Christ through prayer.”

...Produces Word and Deed Living...

Jesus was the first rabbi in history to ever suggest that we should have a fatherly view of God. Jesus’ prayer life reminds us that relationship with God is oriented around who we are and not what we do. Word and deed living is produced from a being before doing perspective. It is not being without doing it’s simply understanding that our being, identified with God, is what produces fruitful doing. Humans have more needs than just the physical reality of what they/we can see. There is a spiritual need that people do not see as readily which must be addressed in order for ultimate healing to come into their lives. When we are feeding our bodies on a spiritual level as well as physical we become a more holistic person which opens the door for word and deed living.  

“Christians must be word and deed people which means we are people who do not despise the world or reflect it because they are utterly different from the world.”

...Which Results in Holistic Healing

As we go about our day as word and deed people we see that we are joining God and his work which results in a comprehensive salvation. How do we view people who have needs in our sphere of influence? Do we see people as an interruption or as individuals in need of communion with their Heavenly Father? We cannot meet every single need in existence, but we are called to have compassion for those who are in our midst. If we are not living in the intimate relationship that Jesus exemplifies than we will see people as an interruption to what is fast and famous. As God’s people we are called to compassion for our world and our communities with a desire for holistic healing. 

 “At the foot of the cross we receive the spirit of sonship that cries out ‘Abba, Father!’ That reality leads us into word and deed living where we join in God’s work to see holistic healing come. Which brings us back again to the foot of the cross.”

Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript


Kingdom Authority

Mark 1:21-34

An Undeniable Authority

The Gospel of Mark unpacks the difference in Jesus’ authority from other Jewish leaders when he visits the synagogue. The Jewish community would gather at the synagogue to be taught by scribes who would often quote well known rabbis in order to give their teaching authority. However, Jesus was different from these teachers of the Torah. Jesus did not speak authoritatively in the academic sense, but spoke in a manner that gave him rule, dominion and power. Immediately Jesus demonstrates this power by rebuking the demon out of a man. Jesus showed his authority in his teaching by demonstrating his power over unclean spirits.

Jesus is the author of all creation which means that there is an in depth knowledge and authority that can only be shown by the one whom all creation is subject to. Those witnessing Jesus’ power could not articulate it, but they were experiencing the authority of the author of all creation.

A Healing Authority

The undeniable authority that Jesus has leads to a healing authority. Jesus’ authority expresses itself in mending, renewing, and healing. As the kingdom fleshes itself out in our lives the brokenness we experience becomes renewed under the authority of Christ. This healing is both spiritual and physical because God’s good creation is not just spiritual but is physical as well. We must remember that what we do in day to day life of the physical realm is important. Jesus came to redeem all things and as we join with him in his work to renew creation what we do with our lives matters.

Jesus’ power and healing authority is the same today as it was in the synagogue all those years ago. In the midst of the inconsolable things of life, Jesus has healing power over our lives. Even though everything won’t be fixed here and now we have hope that Jesus will one day renew all things.

How is Jesus’ Authority Demonstrated?

  1. There is a time coming when all sin will be done away with, and brokenness in every form will be healed.

  2. We should join Jesus in asking God for healing

  3. Recognizing that the broken aspects of our lives are not defeats

“Inconsolable things’ are the sins and miseries that will not be eradicated until heaven comes home, the things that only Jesus, and no one of us, can overcome. We cannot expect to change what Jesus has left unfixed for the moment. The presence of inconsolable things does not mean the absence of Jesus’ power, however. Rather, it establishes the context for it. There in the midst of what is inconsolable to us, the true unique nature and quality of Jesus’s power shows itself to be unlike any other power we have seen.”

—Zack Eswine

A Resurrecting Authority

Jesus’ authority does not subjugate as the kingdoms of this world do. It does not destroy as kings of this world tend to do. Jesus’ authority resurrects, revives, and brings life. When we are healed by Jesus’ resurrection power it leads us to serve the kingdom that has true healing authority. Our lives become marked by hospitality and generosity as we begin building life giving communities right where we are. When Jesus’ authority comes to bear in our lives it gives us a new sense of priorities that reverses the need for dominating others. We do not do this in order to pay anything back but experiencing the healing authority of the kingdom blooms a desire to spread to others what our Savior has done for us.  

In the midst of this we must be careful that we do not confuse business with service. When we see all the inconsolable things of life it can be easy for us to serve in ways that are not effective. We must be careful that we do not trade true Christ honoring service for anxious business. Now, sometimes this comes into our lives because we see all the inconsolable problems of life which makes us apathetic because there is so much that we do not know what to do.

But there are two other reasons that tend to surface in our business:

1. We become busy in our vanity

2. We become busy in our laziness

“In the midst of the inconsolable things of life we have to distinguish from business and service. Business often masquerades as service...a busy Christian is a blasphemous desire to do God’s work for Him.”

Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript

The Call to Follow

Mark 1:14-20

All of us are prone to think about ourselves first and foremost even in the midst of the good news that others have. This results in living in a Kingdom of self. Mark begins his gospel by warning us against the pitfalls of the false Kingdom of self and announces the triumphant kingdom that Jesus brings to us.

Kingdom Contrast

Mark places the kingdom of this world and the Kingdom of God side by side in order to contrast their major differences. Mark wants us to see that the kingdom of this world is a broken Kingdom of self. When we live in the Kingdom of self we tend to treat everyone and everything around us as being geared towards serving us.

Mark wants to point us to a truer and better kingdom. A kingdom of life where the true king is enthroned. God’s people have been longing for a king to set them free from the bonds of the world. Jesus arrives and says that the opportune time has come for the Kingdom of God. The Kingdom of God is the active exercise of God’s righteous power and authority with the rightful king enthroned. Jesus says that there is a new king in power that will usher in the healing of the world and a new way of life.

Even though a new king has been announced we still struggle to keep Jesus on the throne of our lives rather than ourselves. The reason we think about ourselves first is because we are born into a reality of sin. The problem is that there are few things that make us more functionally miserable than being self absorbed. It constantly makes us think of ourselves above everyone else which is a horrible experience. Very few people are capable of treating us or seeing us the way in which we want to be seen or treated. All of this is the outcome of living within the confines of a worldly kingdom.

“The Kingdom of self is heavily defended territory...Most sin, far from being a mere lapse of morals or a weak will, is an energetically and expensively erected defense against God.”

-Eugene Peterson

Kingdom Entrance

Jesus says that the Kingdom of God is at hand. In other words this new kingdom is within reach. We are not there yet, but we can see glimpses of its arrival in our lives.

How do we enter into this kingdom that is within reach, yet is not fully recognized?

1) Repent

Repent means more than simply changing one's mind. It means to rethink everything and look at the world through God’s rule. Repenting includes the act of turning away from wasting our time, money, and talents on the Kingdom of self where we try to surpass other people in the rat race of materialism.

2) Believe the Gospel

Believing in the gospel requires trusting the announcement of joyful news. When we trust the good news we turn from our agendas and enter into the kingdom that Jesus brings. We are all leaning on something that we think matters most in this life. If we lean on anything other than Jesus it is another form of enthroning ourselves. Believing is acting on what we know to be true.

“Repent: give up your agenda and trust me for mine.”

Kingdom Life

The call that Jesus gives us to respond through repentance and trust is an ongoing act rather than a one time event. It is the way that we continue in the life of the Kingdom of God. It is something that should be happening in our daily lives. Following Jesus means that knowing him becomes our supreme passion. Jesus is saying that we must die to the Kingdom of self and enter into the Kingdom of God. Jesus calls us to follow him so fully that all other attachments pale in comparison to our pursuit of him.

“Our call is to bring glimpses and tastes of God’s brand new world that is coming here and now...what people need to experience is an outpost of the Kingdom of God in the midst of a world that operates in the Kingdom of self”

Links: Youtube-Full Sermon Transcript